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Connecting an equalizer to a home stereo
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357mag
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#1
20th December 2009
Old 20th December 2009
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Connecting an equalizer to a home stereo

I'm considering buying a graphic equalizer for my stereo in my bedroom. I found some instructions on Yamaha's site about how to hook it up to the receiver. I guess you use the tape in/out jacks on the back of the receiver.

But I will already have my cassette deck hooked up there so do any of you know how to hook up an equalizer along with a cassette deck to the receiver?

And does this mean that if I record from CD to tape the resulting recording will be colored by however I have the equalizer set?

If I want to go directly from CD to tape and bypass the equalizer how do I do it?
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20th December 2009
Old 20th December 2009
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I would advise against a graphic eq on principle. Do you want to listen to music, or do you want to futz around choosing between 999 different shades of cack?

Graphic eq's appeal to our eyes and egos more than to our ears. Electronically, they work by carving the frequency spectrum into seperate bands, so you can adjust them sperately, and then combines them again. That's a very destructive process, which introduces a lot of noise and distortion and phase shifts. The cheaper boxes are VERY noisy - white noise city here we come.

Sure - you can boost the bass and the treble - and keep on chasing your tail until you end up with Mr Smiley Face EQ. And then realise you can't hear the mids ...

At some point you will try removing your graphic eq, to discover that your music sounds so much better without it ... why not go directly to this and avoid the fuss.

You can get a huge amount of corrective EQ simply by positioning the speakers in your room. Try it and see.
357mag
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20th December 2009
Old 20th December 2009
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Ah excuse me but my room is very dull and dead sounding. Very muffled. And I have my speakers positioned a few feet damn near at head level from me.

What I need is an equalizer plain and simple.
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20th December 2009
Old 20th December 2009
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erm ... the idea of using near-field monitoring is that the dry sound goes direct to your ears, and the room sound is of little consequence. Dull room sound is good - better than splashy reflections.

Most pro's would argue that eq'ing good monitors is a mistake. EQ is a distortion of reality (which is great for creating music, but not so great for actually hearing audio accurately). If your monitors aren't flat or accurate enough, maybe it would be better to upgrade them, than spending a lot of cash on the quality of graphic eq that you would need for passable results.

If your room sound is problematic, the cash would be better spent on some acoustic treatment.
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20th December 2009
Old 20th December 2009
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Sorry - just realised this is not for recording, but for a home stereo. Fine - do what you have to do. I have no time for consumer grade graphic eq's - I can barely tolerate the 'pro' rackmount stuff used for live sound (where they are arguably necessary, due to bad rooms and feedback etc).

Since you are listening to cassette tape, you probably aren't concerned about noise.

I'm not having you on - I personally don't use graphic eq in my home stereos. Many hifi buffs are opposed to them as well. By careful selection of amp and speakers, you should get the sound you want with no need for eq. The goal is to hear the music the way the mastering house released it. And generally, less circuitry is clearer and better.

I will say that when I was using cassette tape, a BBE box was actually pretty good and imo much preferable to any graphic eq. They would have to be pretty cheap now, because people don't need them with digital.

AFAIK, using the Tape Out to send the tuner signal into the eq, and the Tape in to send the processed signal to your amp section is the only way to do it.

In most cases, the eq will have a bypass button anyway.

Always try an eq before you buy - i'm not kidding about the noisefloor they add ...
357mag
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21st December 2009
Old 21st December 2009
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Problem solved.
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