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Guitar frequencies??
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Bobby_Beers
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10th November 2009
Old 10th November 2009
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Guitar frequencies??

Hello there, I'm doing a course in sound engineering, well just started... Been asked to find out the frequencies of certain instruments and put them on a chart.. Like this Interactive Frequency Chart - Independent Recording Network

Then say what frequencies need eqing on them.

I'm looking for the frequencies of acoustic and electric guitars but can only seem to find guitars in general...

Also if you can help on the frequencies for electric organ and acoustic piano would be much appreciated....

Cheers

Or if you know of any good websites to look at which will help can you point me in the right direction....
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10th November 2009
Old 10th November 2009
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Do you have a track that you are studying? The problem is that the frequencies that would need EQing would depend entirely on how the guitar track needs to be sculpted to fit in with other instruments unless there are some obvious issues with the guitar track itself.
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Bobby_Beers
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10th November 2009
Old 10th November 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Insomniaclown View Post
Do you have a track that you are studying? The problem is that the frequencies that would need EQing would depend entirely on how the guitar track needs to be sculpted to fit in with other instruments unless there are some obvious issues with the guitar track itself.
When I said about eqing the frequencies on the guitars i kind of meant what frequencies help bring clarity or make it less boomy or muddy???

I guess something like this

Electric Guitar - Rolloff at 80 hz., cut at 800 hz. to remove "cheap" sound, and edge is around 2.5 k.
Acoustic Guitar - Bottom at 120 hz, body at 240 hz, clarity at 2.5 to 5k.

It's more the full frequency range I am looking for.. like the snare drum is 100Hz to 10kHz i think???
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10th November 2009
Old 10th November 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_Beers View Post
Hello there, I'm doing a course in sound engineering, well just started... Been asked to find out the frequencies of certain instruments and put them on a chart.. Like this Interactive Frequency Chart - Independent Recording Network

Then say what frequencies need eqing on them.

I'm looking for the frequencies of acoustic and electric guitars but can only seem to find guitars in general...

Also if you can help on the frequencies for electric organ and acoustic piano would be much appreciated....

Cheers

Or if you know of any good websites to look at which will help can you point me in the right direction....

1. Guitar frequency should be the same for electric and acoustic using standard tuning. That doesnt include drop tunings though, drop D etc

2. Organ will depend on how many keys you have, registers and foot pedals if your talking pipe organ.
Electronic organ will depend on how many keys it has for the range

3. Piano = 27.500 Hz to 4186.0 kHz (88 keys BTW, there are some with more than that)

Frequencies that need EQ ing on the instruments depends a lot on what your trying to do, the number of instruments, type of them etc

Generally speaking, you can use a hi cut or low cut filter on any track where that frequency is out of the range for THAT instrument

For example, A tenor voice doesnt go much below 130 Hz so you can cut anything below that

The opposite direction is true as well for example a flute guitar doesnst go musch past 21kHz

Im SURE there is a great chart or book on this somewhere

That chart is a good start but you need somethign that says

Mudd=
Whack=
Thud=
Boom=
Sparkle=
Sizzle=
etc
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10th November 2009
Old 10th November 2009
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Generally electric guitars don't go much higher than 10 (to at most generally 15) kHz due to roll-off in the speakers and also some roll off in the typical SM57. Analog cab sims usually implement a 10-15 kHz rolloff to emulate this.

Related to that, in practice, some cabs/speakers might have grating peaks up high above that may be unusable and benefit from a cut or lpf.

But it depends on unique circumstances.
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10th November 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_Beers View Post
When I said about eqing the frequencies on the guitars i kind of meant what frequencies help bring clarity or make it less boomy or muddy???

I guess something like this

Electric Guitar - Rolloff at 80 hz., cut at 800 hz. to remove "cheap" sound, and edge is around 2.5 k.
Acoustic Guitar - Bottom at 120 hz, body at 240 hz, clarity at 2.5 to 5k.

It's more the full frequency range I am looking for.. like the snare drum is 100Hz to 10kHz i think???
Sorry about that. I hadn't had my coffee yet. Here is what I will do for a distorted electric track:

Roll off to 80hz with a high pass. Then I'll put a low shelf just above where my bass guitar fundamental lives (100-160hz), and take a couple of db off of that as well. Just enough so that the boomy quality is reduced, and the low end of the bass can come through.

Mud is interesting because it's also where the fundamental often lives. So I'll sweep through the 250-500hz to find the body, add a peaking band, and then a small cut just after the peaking band. Also make sure you don't have the same freq's boosted on different instruments.

500-800hz is where the boxiness will be. Boxiness reduces the clarity and definition of the guitar. Sweep here with a narrow peaking filter until you find where the guitar has very little focus. Then cut until the guitar comes into focus.

800-1khz usually contains the bass guitar upper harmonic. Attenuating here can give the bass some room to be heard.

1-3khz is the presence zone. If your guitar sounds like its coming out of a telephone, this is where you should look to attenuate. If the guitar is not able to be heard, a little boost in here is helpful.

4-6khz will be where you can make the guitars cut through the mix better by boosting. I like to stay between 4-5khz if I can, but that's where a lot of the drum freq's are, so it can be tough. Also, there are considerations for vocals as well. I just find boosting 6khz and above on distorted electrics thins them out and adds a lot of static.

Hope this is helpful, and sorry I wasn't more helpful before. This is just what I've picked up for distorted guitars. I find you have to do far less work on clean electric guitars.
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