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60's style Drum Micing
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greenfields
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#1
17th August 2009
Old 17th August 2009
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60's style Drum Micing

So I heard a good mic set up is one mic on the Bass Drum and one condenser mic Overhead.

Here's my question:

On the drum overhead mic, Is it best to have the condenser mic on Omni, Cardioid or Figure Eight?


Thanks
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17th August 2009
Old 17th August 2009
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Depends on how much room sound you want...
Omni and Figure8 would provide more room sound then cardioid or hyper cardioid.
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17th August 2009
Old 17th August 2009
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Another cool technique I've seen from a great engineer in Nashville (if you want stereo) is to use the drummer's right side overhead at the side of the kit, about level with the floor tom head. The left should be just left of the snare and the two equidistant from the snare. The imaging is amazing.
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17th August 2009
Old 17th August 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Somewhat_Odd View Post
Another cool technique I've seen from a great engineer in Nashville (if you want stereo) is to use the drummer's right side overhead at the side of the kit, about level with the floor tom head. The left should be just left of the snare and the two equidistant from the snare. The imaging is amazing.
Do you level with the shell or level with the head?
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17th August 2009
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About level with the floor Tom head I believe, or whatever sounds good
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17th August 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Somewhat_Odd View Post
About level with the floor Tom head I believe, or whatever sounds good
its called the glyn johns technique but its a little more in depth than explained// you need to take a mic cable or headphone cable... to measure the distance from the overhead mic.. (middle of capsule) to the snare.. then take that exact distance to the mic on the side of the drummer by the edge of the floor tom.. GRRREEATT sound!!
good luck
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17th August 2009
Old 17th August 2009
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Not sure why you would use a condenser... Two dynamics one over the kit and one on the kick is all I would do. And perhaps a large diaphram room mic.

Condenser over the kit will give you too much. You're going for a 60's sound right? Kinks, Stones, Beatles, that's what I think of.
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18th August 2009
Old 18th August 2009
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good room and great mics.
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18th August 2009
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The Glyn Johns technique can be great, but it helps if you have a good drummer who can lay off the cymbals while still laying into the drums. Also smaller cymbals can be helpful.

Play with the distance between snare and mics. You can get a very broad room sound if you get 10ish feet away, or you can get a tighter but still ambient drum sound from 3-4 feet.

I got good results once with two mics about 30 degrees apart and 10 feet in front of the snare. I didn't even use a bass drum mic cause it sounded so good in a very roomy way.
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18th August 2009
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If you want the 60's sound you have to use some 60's or 60-ish mics and some drums from the same vintage. Thin vintage cymbals really help alot. Finish the formula with some 60s-style playing and the sound is possible to achieve.

It is my understanding from some who were there, some Kick mics of the day would have included AKG D19, Neumann U47 both tube and FET, and other various dynamics. Overheads were always mono and placed to get a good blend of snare and toms. Ribbon mics were popular, especially the Coles 4038 and RCA 77. One could use any large capsule condenser in mono, however.

Placement and the tone of the drums make a huge difference. A/B to some fav tunes and tweak as necessary.
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30th October 2009
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I'm getting a pretty good "Ringo" sound with a dynamic on the bass drum and one (sm57) on the snare/hi hat about 10" above. Or I should say good for a hack like me.. My bass drum mic has a bit of a buzz that phase inverting and tweaking the gain has not yet fixed. It's a pretty cheap mic so that might be it too.

It's a Shure BG 6.1
From what little info there is about this it's just a cheap instrument mic.

How about the best mic placement for the white album/let it be type drum sounds?

thanks
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