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johnnyblotter
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13th February 2005
Old 13th February 2005
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an answer to piracy.

This came to me when I read someone mention a format where there is a CD on one side and a DVD on the other. Well, there ya go. Keep CD's the same price, only make it a standard practice to include DVD footage from the band - rehearsals, shows, whatever. That should barely cost any extra money since I would figure many bands in the position of signing record deals probably have some footage on file. I know that if I could get video of a band I was interested in, I still might download the mp3 or whatever, but I'd be much more likely to go out and buy the CD/DVD. Let's call it a C-DVD. (You heard it first, I don't care what the real name for the format is, mine is catchier and by this post I hereby declare copyright to the term). And even better, the DVD could be a teaser for a full-length DVD release the band/label plans in the future.

More record purchases, problem solved.
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14th February 2005
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rap artists like 50 cent, eminem been doing this, most recently game did it. been packaging full legnth dvds with the retail album for free. Hasnt been the answer to stopping piracy yet becuase the dvd part gets bootlegged as well and is avalaible for download too.
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14th February 2005
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That's because the problem isn't the content or the quality. Warez kiddies couldn't care less about that.

The PROBLEM is the MEDIUM and ANYTHING that can be encoded to DIGITAL can and WILL be BOOTLEGGED.

Enhanced albums - Good.

Present digital access parameters. - Bad.

Nothing is going to change until you can only play the stuff back on a closed systems and applications are on sealed carts that ARE the dongle and ARE the program and ID to one computer, period.

No cart, no app. Run once, it's ID'd to the cart reader and that computer for life and it can't be accessed, opened or BE'd. No compiler access. No API access. It runs, you own it. Yt's out of the machine: it's a coaster and the app doesn't live on the box.

Until then, screen door sound and pictures for the masses for nothing.

People don't rip files and softs because they need them or want them, they rip them because they CAN.

It's the new "staying out all night" or "turfing lawns".

It's the new "screw the man" bullshit, revolutionary, adolescent prestige move for a data capable generation who think that gluing parking meters shut is "illegal and stupid".
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14th February 2005
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Quote:
Originally posted by bunnerabb
Nothing is going to change until you can only play the stuff back on a closed systems and applications are on sealed carts that ARE the dongle and ARE the program and ID to one computer, period.
so now you are saying i can only play my CD in one place?
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14th February 2005
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AAggggHHHH and iLok for my songs.

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14th February 2005
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I think the idea of producing CDs during live shows and selling them as the fans leave the building is part of the solution. Live shows are something internet hackers cannot experience. It's not different from going to the movies and even if you can download live shows from the web, it is not the same. In fact, I am quite surprised we don't get more live events broadcasted in theater on a big screen.

Many artists do not care anymore about CD sales: most of their income comes from live shows and performance royalties. Mechanical royalties are always minimal and in most deals, artists get screwed anyway.

Maybe we are at a point in recording music history where artists that do not perform will not earn anything. One side of the industry (recorded CDs) suffers while the other (live music) keeps going (notice I did not say they thrived).

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14th February 2005
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yeah, live shows are the only way to go but....... it's still important to have big budgets for CD's in order to afford a good producer and decent studio.
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14th February 2005
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You got a point there. How often did we see an act live and think "Boy, they rock! I could not have tell by the CD alone". Back in the 80s, acts like John Butcher's Axis and Dan Reed Network (I'm dating myself here) had a reputation for sounding way better live than on record, partly because they had limited recording budgets.

CD quality is important, but unfortunately, they are increasingly just a publicity expense: a very sophisticated advertizement for the live show.

Even rap acts (god knows I will never pay to see guys lipsinc to a turntable and samplers) are doing quite well on the live circuit. Here in Montreal 50cents filled out the Oplympic *Statium* with very little local advertizement. Man, I wish I was the guy at the door collecting the money (and also one of the guys welcoming the very hot chicks who were waiting by the entrance for the "backstage" action).

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14th February 2005
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Well i tedn to agree with bunner...

but in addition... this may be fine for the more, shall we say, "hand-made" leaning artistes around... but for most people this means adding video crews and lighting and stylists and editing and post-production and an enourmous list of additional production costs...

Are we really suggesting that people make their records, without a producer or engineer, in their front rooms at home on their MBoxes and at the same time shoot video on their digital handycam sitting on the dresser while they work, and then edit in iDVD and put the whole thing out themselves.. and that this will be COMPETITIVE?
THIS will end piracy?

I think realistically, people would download the bootlegged audio tracks of the songs they want and live without the video.
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14th February 2005
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Screw the copy protection- someone will just figure out how to defeat it in the first week and all that money for development and implementation will be down the drain-
Go after the little bastards that are stealing the music- set an example....like genital castration for the first offense and maybe the death sentence for the second offense (though after that first offense the resitivism rates would most likely be extremely low...).
Or we could model it after what Israel does to the palistinians...If your caught illegaly downloading music we come and knock your house down with bulldozers.
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14th February 2005
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Quote:
Nothing is going to change until you can only play the stuff back on a closed systems and applications are on sealed carts that ARE the dongle and ARE the program and ID to one computer, period.
This is exactly why the industry is dying, instead of evolving. The whole attitude of "if people keep stealing music, we just need bigger locks!" is flawed. You're right - people will just get better lockpicks.

The problem isn't "computer hackers". The problem is teaching kids that something intangible and infinitely reproduceable has a monetary value - if you're eating a carrot, and you've purchased or grown that carrot, you have the right to eat it or give it away. But what if you have the ability to copy that carrot without any loss to yourself, and give a copy to a starving friend?

It's really interesting to talk to young kids about this - they understand that copying is wrong, and it's stealing, but can't seem to explain *why* it's wrong.

This article:
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/09...ctive_keynote/
...entitled "How the music biz can live forever, get even richer, and be loved", is an excellent and highly recommended read. Think about how we can make the future better, not about how to keep the future from happening.
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14th February 2005
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Quote:
Nothing is going to change until you can only play the stuff back on a closed systems and applications are on sealed carts that ARE the dongle and ARE the program and ID to one computer, period.
That was a lot more germaine to software than music and DV.

The thing is, it's the inherent Achilles heel of anything that's digital.

ANY data that can be accessed can be altered, reengineered or duped.

There's the rub. Digital's killer app is that it's malleable. Since it's all one's and zeros, it's all meaningless. Those ones and zeros are encoded with other subsets of ones and zeros and they are thereby "playable" or "viewable" as a certain type of data set.

If you open a .jpg of the Mona Lisa in Wordpad, you might get a bitchin' fondue recipe. If you draw a moustache on it, so what? You aren't Duchamp and the old girl.. the ACTUAL, UNALTERABLE, Mona Lisa is safe in the Louvre.

Photoshop is a perfect example. It's just an editor that offers deep access to data sets that open as graphics on a CRT. So is Microsoft Picture viewer, only there's no editing features.

The same thing that makes digital more cost effective and less liable to quality degradation is also the very thing that makes it utterly meaningless. An LP was, what it was. Fullstop. Period. It got scratched or damaged and you BOUGHT ANOTHER COPY because people didn't have lathes and master presses.

EVER SINGLE PERSON IN THE WORLD WITH A COMPUTER NOW OWNS A PRESSING PLANT.

They're like dryer lint; they're ubiquitous. And therefore, all but devoid of any commercial value.

Locking up music more? There is no "more" with digital.

My idea for the sealed system carts is actually more for software and works like this:

1): Create a sealed - cart reader interface that jacks into your USB 2.0 or has options for FireWire or even serial or PCI.

2): Implement software releases on small carts that plug into said interface.

3): The interface ID's to YOUR machine when it's installed. It ID's ONCE and then it's for THAT machine.

4): The carts with the software are sealed. All of the I/O ports on the machine can access the cart reader interface, and data can be bussed along any necessary architecture in the machine. This allows software that's on the cart to work seamlessley with all other plugs or side-chained applications necessary.

5): THE CART HAS TO BE IN THE MACHINE TO RUN. Period. The software IS the dongle. It IS the I-Lok.

6): If you snap the software into another machine's cart reader interface, you get a read error and no tickie, no washie.

7): This also works for operating systems. No more re-installing ponderous, shitty O/S's. The cart IS the O/S is the cart in Slot 1.

8): The cart has NO API interface abilities. It is what it is and you can't access it with a compiler.

9): The cart readers can be configured to read one to four carts at once, and even snapped into the PCI bus via a standard breakout interface.

10): You open the cart, it's shot. Period. No second chance. You try and alter the cart ID, it wipes. Period.

11): The cart reader interface reads the PC ID, the cart is married to the cart interface reader ID upon initial installation and that shit is what it is forever.

12): The registration and activation is tied to the hardware, so even if you register on the net, it's not going to work on any other machine after the first time it runs.

13): You can't transfer the software from the cart to the system.

Bing.

Piracy free software.

Certainly not a long term solution for software but one could argue that it would allow the software industry to get back on it's feet to get a market model that would work when all data is once again completely accessible and the carts aren't enough.

Now.. for music? I don't know... How do you tell a kid that the three million dollars it took to create and initially promote this album they like so much isn't exactly milk money and you're gonna need to recoup it all and change before you even get to buy a sandwich?
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14th February 2005
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I didn't mean an end to piracy literally; poor wording on my part. What I thought is that the idea might entice people to buy the actual CD. And I don't mean to record on your m-box. My point is that a lot of bands, even with no budget, have someone with a cheap digital camera doing something. Forget stylists and all that. If there's a new band I'm interested in, I'd much rather see that raw stuff and I think other people would too. Of course people will still rip this and upload it - point taken - but that is more work and bandwith than just the audio, and might be a bit harder to find.

The live CD thing is a good idea too. Only problem with that is getting a halfway decent mix from the sound guy is gonna be difficult at best. You would need to hire an engineer with a good mobile rig. And would the resultant sales pay off? At medium-sized to bigger venues, possibly yes. Then again, it's a risk for the band cause what if they sound terrible that night?
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15th February 2005
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Quote:
You would need to hire an engineer with a good mobile rig
Yes. You would. for instance: There's this guy in Cleveland...


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15th February 2005
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bunner,
your example is helpful to decide whether we humans can become digital beings.
a few decades before, everything was analog, and less than perfect. kids had many chances to fail and do wrong, and they developed, and sometimes it came out right, what initially was considered wrong - dada - unexpected innovation!
they felt alive: there was a chance to cross the limits and not get caught.
then the decision to behave well and avoid the danger was conscious and from the inside.
in a perfect digital world there is virtually nothing you can do wrong, and if still, you get caught at once, or you are VERY wealthy and its a bargain to change the rules to your desire.

you know what "gutenberg" means?
the power of spreading or keeping content was taken away from the church and given to the citizen.
there was no royalty to the bible, see?
it was more important to be able to print, than to prevent illegal copying.

computers and accessories today are enabling THE gutenberg age of multimedia.
we can become BORG, or stay humans...

open computing is like globalisation, in fact it is its mirror: you cannot reset or return the process, but improve the rules.
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15th February 2005
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Heady stuff, but there's something you overlooked, IMHO.

Digital doesn't MEAN anything. You just reboot. There's no "thing" there. No paint, no Mona Lisa.. just stuff you can move around or delete.

Reboot... no consequences, no artifacts.. new game. No rules because there's no corporeal results.

Ctrl+Alt+Del is NOT real life.
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15th February 2005
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let me remind of existentialism and darwinism.

WE, or the strongest of us, decide the meaning of digital content.

digital tools are very perfect and compete or struggle with human behavior.
there are political groups who have the vision that humans become more perfect or better functioning (to whom?) when the control by digital systems is applied (or implied?) upon them.
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15th February 2005
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Yeah.. there are also groups who want to protect mosquitos.

The point is, no matter what sort of rarified simulcrum we might make of human existance, it's nothing more than that.
There's an old saying in this industry. "It is what it is." The breadth and scope of the human experience will never be reformatted, only enhanced or degraded.

These aspects usually run in concurrent fashion, sadly.
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15th February 2005
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Don't know if it's been mentionned here: Maria Schneider won a grammy last night for an album that was only available on the internet and finaced by her fans! Wow!

www.artistshare.net

A cure for piracy? No, but a very good way to keep it real: artists relating directly to the fans with no record company between them. Apparently, she spent $87,000 on the CD, so I believed she got the quality she was after.

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15th February 2005
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bunner. what if i buy software. install it on a machine. then upgrade to a new machine because the said software was a hog and ran too slow on the old machine... then i wouldnt be able to move it to the new machine.
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15th February 2005
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Quote:
Originally posted by alphajerk
bunner. what if i buy software. install it on a machine. then upgrade to a new machine because the said software was a hog and ran too slow on the old machine... then i wouldnt be able to move it to the new machine.
Yup.

The new machine would have it's own cart reader and you would send the machine and cart reader ID for both machines to the manufacturer with a copy of your license and they would send you a new cart with the software in exchange for your old one and shipping.
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15th February 2005
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Quote:
Originally posted by bunnerabb
Yup.

The new machine would have it's own cart reader and you would send the machine and cart reader ID for both machines to the manufacturer with a copy of your license and they would send you a new cart with the software in exchange for your old one and shipping.
man, thats hassle. and that goes to my whole stance on CP.... if you are punishing the paying user for paying, somethign just isnt right.
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15th February 2005
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Quote:
Originally posted by alphajerk
man, thats hassle. and that goes to my whole stance on CP.... if you are punishing the paying user for paying, somethign just isnt right.
No more of a hassle than waiting for a T-shirt from Land's End or a box from Fletcher to arrive. And overnight on 4 Oz. is prety cheap. Not much of a hassle to prevent piracy and bring costs down.
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15th February 2005
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Man, that new anti-piracy system we built works great! Now nobody can steal our software anymore!

...what do you mean, we had to triple our customer service staff to keep up with user problems?

...what do you mean, our 'first customers' have dropped sharply? You mean kids were stealing our software, then buying it when they started to produce professionally?

...what do you mean, someone wrote a software dongle emulator and our millions in R&D were wasted? Now we have to raise the price on the next version!
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15th February 2005
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Quote:
Originally posted by mux
Man, that new anti-piracy system we built works great! Now nobody can steal our software anymore!

...what do you mean, we had to triple our customer service staff to keep up with user problems?
R&D can circumvent most of that. That's why things are tested. Could it be any worse than a Microsoft release every two years?

Quote:
...what do you mean, our 'first customers' have dropped sharply? You mean kids were stealing our software, then buying it when they started to produce professionally?
Just until the next batch of kids came along and stole it, too.

Quote:
...what do you mean, someone wrote a software dongle emulator and our millions in R&D were wasted? Now we have to raise the price on the next version!
There is no dongle. There is no crack. There is no "writing". The code can't be accessed with any API or compiler, the cart is either in the machine or it isn't, and when it isn't, it's a paperweight. Plus, if you plug it into the card reader and jack the cart reader into anything but a slot on the system it's ID'd to, nothing happens.

At all.

It's by no means perfect, but the degree to which it annoys a lot of people gives it some validity. : )

It's certainly not the worst idea I've seen, and yes, it is my idea. I came up with this years ago and was roundly laughed at, but the only way to stop warez, if you're interested in doing so, is with plain old hardware. I mean, code protection is.. just... more code. Code... is what the 5Cr1p7 K1DD13z are, like, HaXX0r1nG, ya know? Trying to protect code with code is like trying to keep fish fresh by sticking it inside another fish.

I'm not against kids trying out warez to get a feel for something, but I'd rather see the company send out free, temporary, expirable, full-function carts. If you like it, in 14 days, you buy it. If not, in 14 days it's a keychain fob.

I've auditioned some stuff with warez, and I tossed what I didn't intend to buy.. very handy. It's not the way of a profitable business, though.

The code is everywhere an anything can be turned into anything else, so.. the only way we have, atm, to control structured data set integrity.. is to control the access at the machine level with hardware. Limitless code to write and create. Only one way to access it for the end user or competitiors.

If you want to stop it, it has to be stopped cold and a few people are just gonna have to grouse a bit and learn another curve.

Like they do for Microsoft. Every ... two ... years.

*sigh*
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15th February 2005
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In my opinion it comes down to the personal ethics and morals of the user.

No matter what we have for copy protection, Any audio signal that can be sent to an amp, speakers, or headphones can be recorded. If there is some type of analog audio output, then it can be sent to a digital recording device and recorded.

Will it be a 100% digital copy? No. But it will still sound pretty dam good and the individual will probably convert it down to an mp3 in the end anyways.

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15th February 2005
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Quote:
Originally posted by bunnerabb
No more of a hassle than waiting for a T-shirt from Land's End or a box from Fletcher to arrive. And overnight on 4 Oz. is prety cheap. Not much of a hassle to prevent piracy and bring costs down.
thats a hassle... and it bringing costs down is utopian at best.

personally, when i buy software, i want freedom with it.
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15th February 2005
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Quote:
Originally posted by alphajerk
thats a hassle...
Yup.

Quote:
and it bringing costs down is utopian at best.
Nope.

Quote:
personally, when i buy software, i want freedom with it.
I just want it to do what it says on the tin.
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15th February 2005
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Quote:
Originally posted by bunnerabb
[B]R&D can circumvent most of that.
You obviously have some software engineering education, but just as obviously, you do not work in the industry. R&D is *expensive*. To an outsider, the music industry is the same - that album cost *$3 MILLION DOLLARS?!? Where did the money go?!?

Quote:
Just until the next batch of kids came along and stole it, too.
No, in your example, it's theoretically impossible to steal - therefore the kids stop learning to use, say, Maya, and start stealing and teaching themselves 3D Studio Max instead. Longterm effect - game design houses have a harder time finding talented young Maya animators and programmers, and switch to 3D Studio Max to save money.

I can't quote you any numbers, but that's what my friends at three very famous game design firms all say... I mean, more on topic, why do you think Protools still exists? It was well on its way to death until they brought out "Protools Free", and now it's still going strong!

Quote:
There is no dongle. There is no crack. There is no "writing". The code can't be accessed with any API or compiler, the cart is either in the machine or it isn't, and when it isn't, it's a paperweight. Plus, if you plug it into the card reader and jack the cart reader into anything but a slot on the system it's ID'd to, nothing happens.
if it's data on the card, it can be cracked. Look at the old days of the Amiga and Commodore hardware copy-protection - hell, look at the mod chips people install into XBoxes and PS/2's nowadays. If the application is just data on a card that won't run unless the computer has verified that you are allowed to run it, then don't bother replacing the card, replace the verifier. There's no way to prevent someone doing the exact same hack as stealing satellite TV: put a small computer between the card reader and the desktop, and when the card reader asks "am I allowed to run?", the small computer replies "Yes, of course!". People often forget that the "hackers" are often well-employed software or electronics engineers who look at copy protection as a challenging hobby!

Quote:
It's certainly not the worst idea I've seen, and yes, it is my idea.
Maybe it is an original thought for you, and much respect for coming up with it, but it is certainly not a new idea! There's definitely some elements of Microsoft's Trusted Computing Platform Architecture, or Palladium, or whatever the hell they're calling it these days...

...and please. "We'll prevent copying by putting the program on an uncopyable cartridge!". The Atari 2600 did that just fine, thanks, followed by every other cartridge-based system. Did it prevent copying? Yes. Did it split the industry into five or six completely un-interchangeable entities and eventually run the console market into a ten-year abyss? Yes.

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I'm not against kids trying out warez to get a feel for something, but I'd rather see the company send out free, temporary, expirable, full-function carts. If you like it, in 14 days, you buy it. If not, in 14 days it's a keychain fob.
I don't disagree with this statement, but it's not the 14 days to get a feel for a new audio application I'm thinking of, but rather the three or four years of college, living on ramen and dealing with a shitty old computer and cockroaches in your apartment, when you have the drive and energy to put night after night into learning a skill like audio engineering... but the idea of being able to afford $1000 worth of software is a pipe dream!

The best part is, after you've stolen a wickedly expensive program, learned to manipulate it to the point that you're a power user, and have gotten a job based on these skills, it becomes a point of pride to have the company you're working for purchase a copy of that software.

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The code is everywhere an anything can be turned into anything else, so.. the only way we have, atm, to control structured data set integrity.. is to control the access at the machine level with hardware. Limitless code to write and create. Only one way to access it for the end user or competitiors.
I'm not sure what you're trying to say here. Obviously you have some knowledge of computer engineering, but next to no concept of how the software world works. This utopia of yours would cost *trillions*, would require every person on the planet cash in their computers willingly, and would be obsolete within two years. Microsoft is built on a single foundation: that PCs are cheap and the hardware design is open and can be built by anyone. Apple's MacOS actually functions much more like you're talking about, which is a good reason why they've only got the market share they do.

So when you bring out this expensive new copy protection scheme that you've designed - what's to prevent your competitors from coming out with another system, similar to yours but incompatible, for half the price?

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If you want to stop it, it has to be stopped cold and a few people are just gonna have to grouse a bit and learn another curve.
Oh, of course - just like if you want to stop drug use, you just have to stop the production of drugs, and people will just have to get over it. Easy, right?

All with respect, of course! I've quite enjoyed your posts on this topic.
#30
15th February 2005
Old 15th February 2005
  #30
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Originally posted by bunnerabb
Locking up music more? There is no "more" with digital.

My idea for the sealed system carts is actually more for software and works like this:

1): Create a sealed - cart reader interface that jacks into your USB 2.0 or has options for FireWire or even serial or PCI.

2): Implement software releases on small carts that plug into said interface.

3): The interface ID's to YOUR machine when it's installed. It ID's ONCE and then it's for THAT machine.

4): The carts with the software are sealed. All of the I/O ports on the machine can access the cart reader interface, and data can be bussed along any necessary architecture in the machine. This allows software that's on the cart to work seamlessley with all other plugs or side-chained applications necessary.

5): THE CART HAS TO BE IN THE MACHINE TO RUN. Period. The software IS the dongle. It IS the I-Lok.

6): If you snap the software into another machine's cart reader interface, you get a read error and no tickie, no washie.

7): This also works for operating systems. No more re-installing ponderous, shitty O/S's. The cart IS the O/S is the cart in Slot 1.

8): The cart has NO API interface abilities. It is what it is and you can't access it with a compiler.

9): The cart readers can be configured to read one to four carts at once, and even snapped into the PCI bus via a standard breakout interface.

10): You open the cart, it's shot. Period. No second chance. You try and alter the cart ID, it wipes. Period.

11): The cart reader interface reads the PC ID, the cart is married to the cart interface reader ID upon initial installation and that shit is what it is forever.

12): The registration and activation is tied to the hardware, so even if you register on the net, it's not going to work on any other machine after the first time it runs.

13): You can't transfer the software from the cart to the system.

Bing.

Piracy free software.
LOL... (no offence, but) I thought it was funny how you had just finished thoroughly explaining that you can't secure digital, and then proceeded to offer your idea on how to secure digital.

There are a couple things here...

1) You were right the first time. There's no way to secure digital. Just because you add hardware to the mix, that doesn't mean you've erected some impenetrable wall of security. At some point, whatever signals that hardware is designed to put out will be converted to 1's and 0's. And that's where the hacker comes in. He'll either spoof the cart or decode whatever the cart reader is designed to transmit and then recreate it or whatever the hell it is that these freaks do in their spare time. And if the data exists on the cart, they will figure out how to get it onto another medium (i.e. their HD). A week or two after this security is implemented, you'd be able to buy black-market cart readers off eBay for ten bucks (for "educational use" only, of course ).

2) This is not just like waiting for a box from Fletcher. You're talking about all the software on your machine.

Let's say, theoretically (albeit impossible), that every software vender on planet earth decided on this one method of anti-piracy (the fact that this would never happen negates this approach altogether, but we can still discuss it for the sake of argument ). First, they would all have to decide what measure of "change" to the system would determine that it's a "different" system (just like M$ does with it's Windows activation). So, if I upgrade my video card... that's not enough, but if I upgrade my video card and motherboard, then that is enough to "trigger" the security. If I upgrade the machine entirely, that's obviously going to require re-authorization.

Next, once I have triggered the appropriate flags, I would then need to reacquire all the carts needed for every piece of software on my machine. This is the equivalent of buying 10 different items from 10 different stores... moving to Philly a year later... and being required to contact all ten stores separately and waiting for them to each re-ship you those ten items before you can start using them again.

It's a bit oversimplified to think that this wouldn't be a major hassle, or to think that not many people would be affected by it. I use a number of expensive apps in a number of different areas (digital audio, application development, etc.) I'd have to have a different cart for each app and, in the case of digital audio, a cart for each plug-in pack that I buy (Waves, UAD, Bomb Factory, etc.). I'd have carts stuck in every orifice of my machine.

3) The implications of moving an O/S to this type of interface are astounding. Even just moving the major applications poses problems, but having the O/S in an "invisible" bottle somewhere off the HD is just not something that people are going to be willing to deal with. Think how much harder that makes it for developers. You're saying the cart won't have an API... well then the OS won't have an API... yeah... that's gonna work out reeeeeal well. ok

Google "trusted computing". It's the next step in what you're talking about and it's even more inhibitive and dangerous.

Don't get me wrong... I know this is a major problem, and I'm not one of those "all software should be free" nutjobs. Kudos to you for trying to think of a way to put a stop to software piracy, but I just don't think there really "is" a solution to this. Well... let me put it this way. I don't really think there is a "good" solution to this. Anything remotely resembling a comprehensive "fix" for this problem also resembles a very invasive, very cumbersome "punishment" for law abiding citizens who actually pay for the software they use (even though they're a dying race these days ).


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