How do you pronounce......
#91
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #91
Gear Head
 

I have a crazy one:

Anyone knows about "SKRYDSTRUP"? They make routing devices, midi controllers, line mixers, ...

Actually, the pronounciation is so weird that their former website had a special FAQ about it! It has changed now though...

Any danish GS on the board to teach me?

iode
#92
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #92
Lives for gear
 
GilWave's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamJay
heard a guy pronounce Neve waaaay off the other day. ("neeeeev")
so here's a little necro-bump to make sure that doesnt happen again.

"knee-va" kids!
say it 10 times in a row.
Since when?
#93
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #93
Back to Bob...

We all know that Bob's second name is pronounced Mogue (rhymes with vogue as someone pointed out earlier). But do the synths & audio hardware share this pronounciation.

Moog Rogue would seem to suggest that they do but then what about Moogerfoogers.

How are you supposed to pronounce that??

Mogue-er-fogue-er????
#94
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #94
Moderator
 
Reptil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by crypticglobe
Only if you a Southern Preacher on a roll about Gaaawwwd-A!

the man IS living in Texas now

Neutrik is from the country of Lichtenstein (Lih-ten-stain)
the old world is full of little tricks, si?
#95
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #95
Moderator
 
Reptil's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules
Some older Brits (like, 70+) will SHOUT to a non English speaker ..believing that will help.

I need to get to the TRAAAAAAAAAAAAIN STAAAAAAAAAAAAAAATION!!!!!!

Do you KNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOW where that ISSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS?

Its so dumb... and embarrassing to watch
I think thats seriously awesome! And a rare sight indeed now! Protect the english heritage!
#96
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #96
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octatonic's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Songhead
Here's one I've been wondering about...

Autechre
???
I read in a few interviews that they themselves pronouce it as:

'Orteker'

Most people pronounce it as Or-Tech-Rer it seems, including myself until I read the interviews.
#97
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #97
Gear nut
 
Matej's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamJay
heard a guy pronounce Neve waaaay off the other day. ("neeeeev")
so here's a little necro-bump to make sure that doesnt happen again.

"knee-va" kids!
say it 10 times in a row.
Are you reffering to Rupert or the creme company that made all those stimulating commercials? I wouldn't mind watching those 10 times in a row...
#98
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #98
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opentune's Avatar
 

Coool thread !!!

How do you say "DAW"? Is it:

Dee - ay - double u

or

DAW (like in dawn - without the "n")

Oh, and watch out what you´re going to say about the french!!
#99
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #99
Gear maniac
 

This might be the funniest thread ever.

Haha.
#100
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #100
Gear Guru
 

The Brits are positively neurotic about pronouncing French words. I went to England for a vacation (holiday for the Brits ) and a Brit pal told me there was a great car museum in a town he pronounced "Beuly". I couldn't find it in any guide book. Years later, I read an article about the museum, and it turns out the town is spelled Beaulieu!
#101
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #101
Gear nut
 
Jamstudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trp
Neumann = short "ah" like in "mother"
or like the a in bal
#102
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #102
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Bob Ross's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thenewyear
Back to Bob...

We all know that Bob's second name is pronounced Mogue (rhymes with vogue as someone pointed out earlier). But do the synths & audio hardware share this pronounciation.

Moog Rogue would seem to suggest that they do but then what about Moogerfoogers.

How are you supposed to pronounce that??

Mogue-er-fogue-er????

Yes, exactly.


Quote:
Originally Posted by zimv20
Langevin -- hard or soft 'g'?

Kurzweil -- w or v sound?

soft G in Langevin; there's an explanation on the Manley website.

I've always heard Ray Kurzweil's name pronounced with a W, but since it was never Ray himself doing the pronouncing I guess that's still conjecture.
#103
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #103
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Ross
I've always heard Ray Kurzweil's name pronounced with a W, but since it was never Ray himself doing the pronouncing I guess that's still conjecture.
What is the question to which the answer is 9W?



Do you spell your name with a V Mr. Vagner?
#104
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #104
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PRobb
Do you spell your name with a V Mr. Vagner?

Q-Is it Hawaii or Havaii?
A- It's Havaii
Q- Thank you
A- You're velcome
#105
10th January 2006
Old 10th January 2006
  #105
Quote:
Originally Posted by djui5
That's how they pronounce the name on the other side of the pond...and is actually the proper pronuncation of the word.......but here in the "states" it's jaguar.......like we always pronounce it.........unless you drink your tea with the pinkey out..then it's Jag you are
I disagree. While I consider the Oxford English Dictionary to be the only true dictionary and most English pronunciations to be generally proper and correct, The British have a penchant for corrupting the pronunciations of certain foreign words and place names, though they are loathe to admit any linguistic shortcomings. For all the shit you have to endure from certain people in the UK about the US accent, they are not so tough on themselves when it comes to any foreign language other than French or German.

Jaguar is a word originally from Paraguay and the pronunciation "JAG-you-are" is not at all how speakers of Spanish in South America (let alone the indians that coined the word) would say it.

Sam-You-Rye for Samurai (not everybody says this, but I've heard it)

One of the silliest is Nicaragua. To the Brit, it is "Nick-a-RAG-you-a" and again you simply have to hear any native speaker of Spanish pronounce it to know that it is wrong. The British neither discovered the Jaguar (though they invented one!) nor the country of Nicaragua, end of story. "Managua" gets equally bad treatment.

Having said that, I will concede the following, being of English citizenship and generally supportive of my native land:

Aluminium — yes, the US dropped the "i" which is conventional when describing minerals on the periodic table. We are lazy ****s.

The US has a lot to answer for by supporting that illiterate bastard Noah Webster, who is responsible for most of America's illiterate spellings as well as our beloved dictionary. The ones we rejected are even worse and he had a million of them. I quote here from his infamous spelling reform manifesto: "greef should be substituted for grief; kee for key; beleev for believe; laf for laugh; dawter for daughter; plow for plough; tuf for tough; proov for prove; blud for blood; and draft for draught. In this manner ch in Greek derivatives, should be changed into k; for the English ch has a soft sound, as in cherish; but k always a hard sound. Therefore character, chorus, cholic, architecture, should be written karacter, korus, kolic, arkitecture;" This man needed supervision.

The word ARSE should be adopted immediately in the US. While it sounds very satisfying to use many of the American phrases that use the word "Ass", such as "that kicks ass", it would make a nice addition to our already rich lexicon. We have been missing out on a word in use since Anglo-Saxon times. Now get off your arse and use it.

Americans misuse the word "quite". It has always placed somewhere on the value scale between "somewhat" and "a good amount," in other words, in the middle range and never gets over, say, 70% intensity. It does not mean "very much" or "a lot". The word "Rather" registers higher than Quite. "Quite a lot" I suppose somehow bridges the gap. However, it's insulting if somebody asks you if you enjoyed their cooking and you said it was "quite good". Also, there is nothing nice about saying "you're quite welcome." Saying things like, "it's raining quite a bit, I can tell you." is British understatement. "It's raining it's arse off out there" is more to the point.

[/RANT]

Goodness, what an outburst. We now return to talking endlessly about Neve clones.
#106
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #106
Lives for gear
 
Jason Poulin's Avatar
 

poutine

is


poo - ts- in








Jason
#107
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #107
Gear addict
 
ExistanceMusic's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by D Pinder
Saying things like, "it's raining quite a bit, I can tell you." is British understatement. "It's raining it's arse off out there" is more to the point.
I laughed my arse off! I'm going to start using that. Nice rant, I agree on every point.
#108
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #108
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GilWave's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by D Pinder
The US has a lot to answer for by supporting that illiterate bastard Noah Webster, who is responsible for most of America's illiterate spellings as well as our beloved <snip> This man needed supervision.
Well, it wood haf simplified things

Quote:
Americans misuse the word "quite"
I like to think of it as more of an evolution of the word, as most Americans will take it to mean what it means to them after years of abuse, as is also the case with the word "cute". Originally, calling one's child "cute" would have been an insult. I myself prefer 'cheeky bastard'.

The Brits have a more colourful experience with our language - you seem to have more fun with words and wordplay then the average American does. Although it does sound very strange to me to hear the words 'aluminium' and 'advertisement' in the UK. And it is always interesting that Great Britain uses the word Zed for the letter Z instead of just calling it Zee.

And why do we go to 'the' hospital and you just go to hospital? Any specific reason for the extraneous 'the'? By the way, is it true that the reason Jaguar (pre-Ford ownership) doesn't make Televisions is because they couldn't get them to leak oil?
#109
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #109
Gear nut
 
Gideon's Avatar
 

"Aluminum"

#110
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #110
Lives for gear
 
petsematary's Avatar
 

Neve
Nåjmann

#111
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #111
Gear Guru
 
rickrock305's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crypticglobe
Only if you a Southern Preacher on a roll about Gaaawwwd-A!




LOL
#112
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gideon
Actually, "Aluminum" is the name originally given to the element by its discoverer, Humphry Davy. (More correctly, he first named it "Alumium" in 1808, then changed it to "Aluminum" in 1812; see below for more details.)

Aluminum etymology 1: (scroll down to "Etymology/Nomenclature"):

Aluminum etymology 2: (scroll down):
Great info. I've never heard of this before. The fact that Davy couldn't make up his mind didn't help matters. I can't believe it was some fussy reader who wrote a letter to the editor and got it changed. That's rediculous.

Quote:
Outside English, the "ium" spelling is widespread: the word is aluminium in French and German, and identical or similar forms are used in many other languages. Consequently it is the more common of the two spellings in global terms, even though there may be more users of aluminum in the English-speaking world.
I think that's what I was going for.
#113
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #113
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DAWgEAR's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamJay
heard a guy pronounce Neve waaaay off the other day. ("neeeeev")
so here's a little necro-bump to make sure that doesnt happen again.

"knee-va" kids!
say it 10 times in a row.
Call Rupert Neve Designs: 512-847-3013 and listen to the message.
#114
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #114
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Stick's Avatar
 

I didn't, but it's "Neev" right?

#115
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #115
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superburtm's Avatar
 

What about Ross Hogarth. Is it Ho garth or hog arth?
#116
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #116
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GilWave's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by superburtm
What about Ross Hogarth. Is it Ho garth or hog arth?
It's Mister Ho Garth to you!
#117
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #117
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Phrygian's Avatar
 

Ok, Takamine...

I've heard it Taka-Mine and Taka-Meanie



And then there's Mesa..

I've heard Mess-ah
Mee-sah
May-sah
#118
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #118
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copperx's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DAWgEAR
Call Rupert Neve Designs: 512-847-3013 and listen to the message.
So what is it? "Neev"?

Can't call ... I'm in mexico
#119
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #119
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DAWgEAR's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by copperx
So what is it? "Neev"?

Can't call ... I'm in mexico
Yes. Neev.
#120
11th January 2006
Old 11th January 2006
  #120
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bcgood's Avatar
 

Heavy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Musicfuelzgood
here's an old one, of my fav. engineer. Jack Joseph Puig. last name anyone?

-b
Maybe puke? Sorry, I know that's harsh but I hated his work on Heavier Things for John Mayer. That album sounds so digital, except for the last track Wheels. John Alagia did such a better job on Room for Squares. Even though it's digital it sounds very warm and natural, groovy!

bcgood
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