EQ Frequency Chart.
Old 23rd May 2007
  #1
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Thread Starter
EQ Frequency Chart.

Can anyone point me to a website that has comprehensive EQ chart that I can print out and post on my wall. Still getting my ears used to identifying frequencies and it would be nice to have a reference handy.

For common specific instruments AND a general one would be great.

e.g.
Bass Guitar - Attack or pluck is increase at 700 or 1kHz; Bottom added at 60 or 80Hz; string noise at 2.5kHz.

AND
FREQ produced effect overused.
16Hz to 60Hz Sense of power, felt more than heard makes music muddy
Old 23rd May 2007
  #2
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Old 23rd May 2007
  #3
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Old 23rd May 2007
  #4
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soupking's Avatar
 

do a search on 'soupking frequency'


I posted a question about this earlier in the year. ehtan winer gave a response with chart.
Old 23rd May 2007
  #5
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Thats a great chart. Again not what I was after.

More of the... 50hz is 'boomy' variety. Nice printable A4 sheet. (I thinking I'm gonna have to do one myself...)


Oh and.. I found the following GIF pretty handy. Cant remember where I found it. If the owner/designer wants me to take it down I will.
Attached Thumbnails
EQ Frequency Chart.-instrument-frequencies.gif  
Old 23rd May 2007
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by obostic View Post
Some useful information there, though the section on eq'ing the fundamental frequency of various instruments is rather misinformed, IMO. For example - 40 hz is not the fundamental frequency of a bass
, its the fundamental frequency of the low E (just about). The fundamental frequency depends entirely on what note is being played, not what the instrument is. If you boosted 40hz on a (4 string) bass part that was playing an ascending riff beginning on the lowest D it would have absolutely no effect, as 40hz is well below the fundamental of the D.

Dan Fox
Old 23rd May 2007
  #7
Head of Bumping Security (B.S)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by UPRYZ View Post
Some useful information there, though the section on eq'ing the fundamental frequency of various instruments is rather misinformed, IMO. For example - 40 hz is not the fundamental frequency of a bass
, its the fundamental frequency of the low E (just about). The fundamental frequency depends entirely on what note is being played, not what the instrument is. If you boosted 40hz on a (4 string) bass part that was playing an ascending riff beginning on the lowest D it would have absolutely no effect, as 40hz is well below the fundamental of the D.

Dan Fox
I agree. I've messed around with appying eq to the fundamental notes of a song, but never the lowest note on the instrument. If the track is in D and I'm eq'ing the bass instrument, I'll start around the lower couple of D fundamentals, and also maybe a mid and a high one for the attack, tone, etc... I don't know if this method works any better or worse than using your ears for starting points..... so I always sweep the frequency around a bit and listen anyway. But I figure it can't hurt right?

Again, not what the og poster is looking for, but here is a note/frequency chart for the Crane Song Ibis eq, which is labeled with notes instead of frequencies.

http://www.cranesong.com/IBIS%20FREQUENCY%20CHART.html
Old 23rd May 2007
  #8
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Good, useful posts.

Thanks, & please keep 'em coming.

I just made the leap to using good outboard eq units on inserts instead of plugs, and my ears feel like a huge veil is being lifted for me in this area. Same with comps.
Old 23rd May 2007
  #9
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Thread Starter
No no. I know that. Just providing a chart in response to the 'alternate' responses I got.

http://www.recordingwebsite.com/articles/eqprimer.php

This list was more like what I wanted. E.G.

Boosting 5KHZ - Increase for vocal presence.


Might just take that list and make it 'pretty' for my WALL will post when done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UPRYZ View Post
Some useful information there, though the section on eq'ing the fundamental frequency of various instruments is rather misinformed, IMO. For example - 40 hz is not the fundamental frequency of a bass
, its the fundamental frequency of the low E (just about). The fundamental frequency depends entirely on what note is being played, not what the instrument is. If you boosted 40hz on a (4 string) bass part that was playing an ascending riff beginning on the lowest D it would have absolutely no effect, as 40hz is well below the fundamental of the D.

Dan Fox
Old 23rd May 2007
  #10
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Thread Starter

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Starr View Post
Good, useful posts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Starr View Post

Thanks, & please keep 'em coming.
!!!
Old 23rd May 2007
  #11
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Ethan Winer's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrizcol View Post
Still getting my ears used to identifying frequencies and it would be nice to have a reference handy.
See this:

The Art of Equalization

--Ethan
Old 23rd May 2007
  #12
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I always like Ethan's post!
Old 23rd May 2007
  #13
Gear Head
 

i know what he is getting at and i am interested in the same type of reference

for example, we all know a kick drum is primarily one of the lowest elements of a song as far as fundamental tone (i know bass can go lower), but every kick drum sounds different, and that, i think, is due to the other prominent elements/frequencies in the sound of the kick, other than (but in addition to) the harmonic frequencies of the primary fundamental. when listening to the kick drum the boom and the beater attack are two distinct elements of the expression intertwined to make one cohesive sound. it would be ultimately useful for me to glance at a chart to see where the likely frequencies of the components of the compound sound are located. like where the beater attack would be in the spectrum... i know one could just spend time with a great eq to isolate it and that is probably the best way to do it, but it would be nice if i could glance at a chart to see where i should start.

the first posted chart is in the right direction but i am hoping someone has put together a more comprehensive survey of the sonic elements of common, specific, instrumental events. (i know i don't have a right to expect someone else to have done the work for me but maybe someone has and that would make my efforts redundant.)

maybe it is too complex of a concept for a simple chart.

where is the pick attack on that guitar because it is starting to fight me and i can't rehire the performer because he is now in portugal and i've already fired the recording engineer...
Old 23rd May 2007
  #14
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theblue1's Avatar
As I think others have pointed out (I'll admit it was a skim and a quick and spotty one at that), it's helpful to know both the range of the fundamentals as well as the overtone range that different instruments generate. A cello can have a low fundamental of a given note but generate a dizzying series of overtones many octaves up.
Old 24th May 2007
  #15
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Ethan Winer's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by downrazor11 View Post
i am hoping someone has put together a more comprehensive survey of the sonic elements of common, specific, instrumental events.
I don't think this is practical. Every violin and acoustic guitar has different resonances, and every microphone position picks up a different balance of frequencies. Not only that, but every mix has different competing frequencies. A snare tone that sounds great in a sparse C&W tune might be lost in a dense pop music mix where a synth bass is prominent in the low midrange.

The only thing "common" to all instruments is that you need to use your ears to find what sounds good, and what sounds bad, and EQ accordingly.

--Ethan
Old 25th May 2007
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by downrazor11 View Post
... when listening to the kick drum the boom and the beater attack are two distinct elements of the expression intertwined to make one cohesive sound. it would be ultimately useful for me to glance at a chart to see where the likely frequencies of the components of the compound sound are located. like where the beater attack would be in the spectrum...
I'd like to take this example to make a case for a different approach. That would be the process of simply relating frequencies to their relative sounds.
In very many cases the same frequencies will generally have the same applications and effect on any number of different instruments or mixes.
To site a few examples- 50hz has a very different feel and weight than 100, but both could be said to apply to 'boom. A beater click, can contain a wide range of frequencies. So with a sweep in the upper end you may choose to place the attack' in any number of spots over two or three octaves or more.

The point being that turning and listening to the eq and relating the sounds to the numbers is universal, where the adjectives end up rather vague at best.
Start with fairly broad chunks -say 50 to 20k in four or five bands. When those start to sound familiar break it into ten bands or so. Any frequency band will apply and cross over rather uniformally in their effect to almost all situations.
Old 25th May 2007
  #17
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GuitarRuss's Avatar
 

Bob Brozman's Live Sound Hints

Any Dobro players? Acoustic guitar players check this out.

Saw this guy live, wonderful show - a true master of the slide guitar and his live sound was clear, powerful and dimensional.

He talks about EQ points for guitar, this is terrific for eq points for guitar among other things. A little simple for some of you senior slutz, but it made a big difference for me about 3 years ago when I first read it.

Bob Brozman LIVE Sound Hints
Old 25th May 2007
  #18
Quote:
<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2">Malcolm Chisholm

30 hz Balls
60 hz Bass
100 hz Useless
200 hz Warmth
700 hz Bass Presence
1 khz Level
3 khz Presence
5 khz Poison
8 khz Brilliance


Poison of course means that while a little 5K sounds great, too much of it will kill you. Like alcohol or other drugs. And to use too much of it means that others will look down on you.
</td></tr></tbody></table>
Malcolm Chisholm
Quote
1
Old 25th May 2007
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by George Necola View Post
100 hz is useless huh?

I guess he doesn't mix R&B or rap.
Old 25th May 2007
  #20
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2
Old 31st May 2007
  #21
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luctellier's Avatar


Hope this helps...

Credits: Samplecraze Conquering EQ
Old 31st May 2007
  #22
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Old 31st May 2007
  #23
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dkerins's Avatar
 

I just want to say a quick thanks to everyone that has posted in this thread. There is a ton of great and usable information found here.
Old 31st May 2007
  #24
Old 31st May 2007
  #25
MonsterIsland.com
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrizcol View Post
Can anyone point me to a website that has comprehensive EQ chart that I can print out and post on my wall. Still getting my ears used to identifying frequencies and it would be nice to have a reference handy.

For common specific instruments AND a general one would be great.

e.g.
Bass Guitar - Attack or pluck is increase at 700 or 1kHz; Bottom added at 60 or 80Hz; string noise at 2.5kHz.

AND
FREQ produced effect overused.
16Hz to 60Hz Sense of power, felt more than heard makes music muddy
Consider giving yourself a time limit on how long you keep this chart around. No matter how accurate it is in general, it can still be misleading because the particular instument you're working on may need a different frequqncy. Maybe your bass needs 500 not 700 or maybe you've got guitars that are masking 700 and you'l never be able to get the bass to cut through there.

One generalization that I heard early on was "boost wide, cut narrow". I've found narrow cuts can do a lot.
Old 1st June 2007
  #26
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by streaky View Post

Printing this now.

I know all of these are generalisations. I need to use by ears ultimately not 'paint by numbers'.. but they're great as a starting point... and also to blutack to my walls and hide the drill holes!
Old 2nd July 2007
  #27
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Thread Starter
Old 2nd July 2007
  #28
MonsterIsland.com
 

Are you sure it's accurate?

"Finally, strong output in the region of 3-5kHz can make recordings sound fatiguing and clinical. If you have strong output in this region reduce it by approximately 3dB."

How do the know that's not too much or maybe not enough?
Old 3rd July 2007
  #29
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u b k's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor View Post
100 hz is useless huh?

I guess he doesn't mix R&B or rap.

my thoughts exactly, except i was thinking where 70's funk bass would be without 100hz. it'd be in a sad place, that's where.

the liking of 5k to poison is pretty funny, though.


gregoire
del
ubk
.
Old 3rd July 2007
  #30
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stevep's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by George Necola View Post
Malcolm Chisholm30 hz Balls
60 hz Bass
100 hz Useless
200 hz Warmth
700 hz Bass Presence
1 khz Level
3 khz Presence
5 khz Poison
8 khz Brilliance


Nice )

But 30 might be a bit low.... and he forgot 16k


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