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skywave rider
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#1
22nd September 2013
Old 22nd September 2013
  #1
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Rack Conversion

I am shipping gear overseas and after googling for hours, I have come to get real medicine from the pros.

I have a 16U Calzone rack. It is rigid, no shock mount. Is there any way to make this floating? Does anyone make a product which screws onto existing rails and rubber isolates another set of rails?

If this is not possible, is it insane to ship in a rigid enclosure like this?

I am sending some old compressors, mic pre, some digital units; and the heaviest load will be 2 Crown PS 200 amps.

The case itself is in very good condition. A few of the clasps are loose when closed, so if I use it I will try inserting rubber into the flange on the doors to take up the slack and provide a seal.
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#2
22nd September 2013
Old 22nd September 2013
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Yes, it's insane to ship that gear bolted into a rigid rack unless you get to load the air freight container yourself, supervising the strap-downs. If it is going as a separate item on its own then have no doubt that it will be manhandled, dropped and generally abused. If you want to make sure the gear will get there ok via normal air freight then you should consider breaking things down into proper cases and boxes. I've done what you propose and had several pieces of equipment destroyed that way. Baggage/freight handlers are merciless, hate large cases and make sure the owners of those cases learn how much they hate them.

philp
skywave rider
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#3
22nd September 2013
Old 22nd September 2013
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Thanks, Philp.
I am not sure if this matters, but it might. I will be using a shipping company. The gear is going with household items. I am not completely clear how it works, I believe the shipping company loads a container. The company is Yamato.
YAMATO TRANSPORT CO., LTD.
#4
22nd September 2013
Old 22nd September 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skywave rider View Post
Thanks, Philp.
I am not sure if this matters, but it might. I will be using a shipping company. The gear is going with household items. I am not completely clear how it works, I believe the shipping company loads a container. The company is Yamato.
YAMATO TRANSPORT CO., LTD.
Might be ok, but unless you are there to see your rack put into the container you'll never know how they handled it. There are still going to be some big bumps and a lot of vibration to the gear in the racks this way--if you really want to be sure the stuff will work when you get there pull it and pack it.

philp
#5
22nd September 2013
Old 22nd September 2013
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My suggestion is that if you have not modified the rack to deal with rear support for all the gear you will end up with a box of parts on the other end of the journey.
The front panels of most gear are not designed to carry the entire weight of the gear in a situation where the equipment receives a sharp shock from being dropped. Power amps are the #1 offender in this regard.
If it were me I'd pack the gear in sturdy boxes and put padding around and between each piece, being careful for any knobs and switches.
All the best,
-mark
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#6
23rd September 2013
Old 23rd September 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpdonahue View Post
My suggestion is that if you have not modified the rack to deal with rear support for all the gear you will end up with a box of parts on the other end of the journey.
The front panels of most gear are not designed to carry the entire weight of the gear in a situation where the equipment receives a sharp shock from being dropped. Power amps are the #1 offender in this regard.
If it were me I'd pack the gear in sturdy boxes and put padding around and between each piece, being careful for any knobs and switches.
All the best,
-mark


We ship empty cases all the time that we have sold on Ebay but I would never ship anything inside a case especially heavy power amplifiers.

If you must ship this way then I would put very tight fitting heavy foam in between each piece of equipment for shock absorbing. That will not prevent damage if the rack is dropped on a corner or if it is dropped from a height but it may protect the equipment from the normal jostling it gets in transit.

Best of luck!
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Celebrating 20 years in the mastering business in 2014
#7
23rd September 2013
Old 23rd September 2013
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How about packing the complete rack (with gear inside padded as Thomas describes) into a sturdy cardboard box with padding material? Similar to household moving.
Yes, it makes it bigger, but still it's one item.
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#8
23rd September 2013
Old 23rd September 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pkautzsch View Post
How about packing the complete rack (with gear inside padded as Thomas describes) into a sturdy cardboard box with padding material? Similar to household moving.
Yes, it makes it bigger, but still it's one item.
The G forces acting on rack gear that is only bolted in from the face place will still tear the equipment apart, padding or no. Also, air freight gets exponentially more expensive as the item increases in size (and weight). At that point a shock-rack starts to look economical, although I would not trust even one of those for shipping outside of a self-loaded container. Those handlers are gorillas, folks.

philp
#9
23rd September 2013
Old 23rd September 2013
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Unbolt everything from the rack. Take the power amps and wrap them securely in 2-3 inches of relatively stiff foam. Pack the amps inside the hollow rack with additional packing material around them so they can't shift.

Then take everything else and pack it properly (padding and container) into a few more boxes as appropriate for insurance, ruggedness, weight, expense, etc.

I left my Alesis in a small case which was thrown under the plane as checked baggage, and it didn't survive the flight home from AMS back to PDX.
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