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AnAverageJoe
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#31
25th September 2007
Old 25th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnabas View Post
Get some wires and connectors and start practicing. Solder them up and then unsolder, and then try it again. Watch out for getting connectors too hot and melting plastic.
Unsolder? How do I do that?
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#32
25th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnabas View Post
That's like testing Macintoshes against Apples. One is a subset of the other.

Kester is a brand name.

44 is a model number.

Kester 44 solder has a rosin core.

Most Kester 44 solder is 60/40, which means 60% tin and 40% lead. Some is 63/37.
So this is the same as Radioshack's Rosin Core 60/40?
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25th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnabas View Post
.031 is the thickness.

0.031” (1.00 mm) is the standard thickness (diameter) solder that most people use.

Solder comes in sizes from the thinnest 0.010” (0.25 mm) to the thickest 0.25” (6.00 mm).


0.05 is thicker solder that we used to use in the old days when wires, terminals, and connectors were much larger. Some still use this size or something in between when the job requires it.
Ok Cool Thanks for the help
#34
25th September 2007
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#35
25th September 2007
Old 25th September 2007
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnAverageJoe View Post
I think I might invest in a station to... I'm trying to look at some good weller stations also some Hakko... Check out the link, I'm looking at the one that costs 93 dollars.

Hakko 936 Soldering Station,821ST612
I can't comment about Hakko products as I've never used them. One feature I really like about my Weller is the digital readout which allows me to set and read the tip temperature. Being able to watch tip temperature fluctuations is a real benefit. Unless your budget is really tight, I'd seriously consider this:

Weller WESD51 Soldering Station

Techni-Tool sells them for $180.75. I think you'd find the extra bucks to be money well spent.

hendo
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#36
26th September 2007
Old 26th September 2007
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Originally Posted by tnjazz View Post
Thanks, I'm in school now so I can't view it because of the proxy network. I'll watch it later on this after noon
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26th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hendo View Post
I can't comment about Hakko products as I've never used them. One feature I really like about my Weller is the digital readout which allows me to set and read the tip temperature. Being able to watch tip temperature fluctuations is a real benefit. Unless your budget is really tight, I'd seriously consider this:

Weller WESD51 Soldering Station

Techni-Tool sells them for $180.75. I think you'd find the extra bucks to be money well spent.

hendo
Thanks I can definitely work around this price range, Thanks a lot!
#38
27th September 2007
Old 27th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnAverageJoe View Post
So this is the same as Radioshack's Rosin Core 60/40?
I'm sure the soldering purists will insist that a name brand solder like Kester will work better than a generic solder like that found at Radio Shack. The rosin flux, which cleans the joint and makes the solder stick better, might be better in the Kester vs. the Radio Shack. It's even possible that the Radio Shack solder is made by Kester.

I've been soldering for almost 40 years and have used all kinds of solder and soldering irons. I don't see enough difference in solder to keep me from buying it at the Radio Shack down the street. I am a RS stockholder, but that's not why I buy there.

As for soldering irons, the stations mentioned are very nice. I've used a few Weller soldering stations over the years. Having a regulated temperature is nice. That being said, I've been using the same cheapo 40W Radio Shack soldering iron for the last 10 years or so. I'm too cheap to invest in a real soldering station when the cheapo works just fine for me, even though I know that a soldering station would make me a little more productive.
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#39
27th September 2007
Old 27th September 2007
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Im stocking up on the good ole slobber, i wonder if the ROHS will effect us buying real solder in the future


.
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27th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnAverageJoe View Post
Unsolder? How do I do that?
Heat up the soldered joint and then suck the molten solder with a solder sucker.

I have this one:
http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...entPage=family

A cheaper alternative:
http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...entPage=family

In the old days, we'd heat up the solder and then use a braided cable to suck up the solder. http://www.newark.com/jsp/Tools+&+Pr...jsp?sku=01F196

If it's solder on a connector, I hold the connector with a pair of pliers, heat up the solder, then bang the pliers on something solid with the solder connection pointed down. This forces the molten solder to leave the connector. Watch out for molten solder flying into your eyes, or putting small holes in your clothes.
#41
27th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevep View Post
Im stocking up on the good ole slobber, i wonder if the ROHS will effect us buying real solder in the future


.
I'm surprised that we are still allowed to use lead-based solder. Until someone comes up with a viable alternative, we get to handle a known poison.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RoHS
Scroll down to the "Criticism" section for the basics.

If you want a serious look at non-lead solders and the technical problems associated with them, look at the following document
http://www.newark.com/pdfs/RohsTechManual_v2.pdf
There is a special section about soldering starting at page 14 (PDF page 15).
Non-lead solders require a higher temperature, which can lead to component failure during soldering.


Lead is dangerous, but safe if you follow proper precautions.
Wash your hands thoroughly after touching solder before eating, smoking, or petting the dog.
#42
27th September 2007
Old 27th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnabas View Post
If it's solder on a connector, I hold the connector with a pair of pliers, heat up the solder, then bang the pliers on something solid with the solder connection pointed down. This forces the molten solder to leave the connector. Watch out for molten solder flying into your eyes, or putting small holes in your clothes.
This has been my method so far and I've got the tiny burn holes in everything to prove it.

I think I'm going to look into getting one of those solder sucker things.
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#43
27th September 2007
Old 27th September 2007
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The best thing about solder suckers, is shootin' those little pieces of solder that have accumulated in the bulb at your friends. Kinda like metallic spitballs.
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AnAverageJoe
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#44
28th September 2007
Old 28th September 2007
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I guess this thread helped more than one person lol Thanks guys, now after this all I have to do is practice
AnAverageJoe
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28th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnabas View Post
I'm sure the soldering purists will insist that a name brand solder like Kester will work better than a generic solder like that found at Radio Shack. The rosin flux, which cleans the joint and makes the solder stick better, might be better in the Kester vs. the Radio Shack. It's even possible that the Radio Shack solder is made by Kester.

I've been soldering for almost 40 years and have used all kinds of solder and soldering irons. I don't see enough difference in solder to keep me from buying it at the Radio Shack down the street. I am a RS stockholder, but that's not why I buy there.

As for soldering irons, the stations mentioned are very nice. I've used a few Weller soldering stations over the years. Having a regulated temperature is nice. That being said, I've been using the same cheapo 40W Radio Shack soldering iron for the last 10 years or so. I'm too cheap to invest in a real soldering station when the cheapo works just fine for me, even though I know that a soldering station would make me a little more productive.
I have the same soldering iron
AnAverageJoe
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28th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevep View Post
Im stocking up on the good ole slobber, i wonder if the ROHS will effect us buying real solder in the future


.
Do you think they will? if so I guess I might stock up as well to, Hey we can sell it in the future if that happens lol
AnAverageJoe
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28th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnabas View Post
Heat up the soldered joint and then suck the molten solder with a solder sucker.

I have this one:
RadioShack.com - Cables, Parts & Connectors: Tools & soldering equipment: Soldering tools & supplies: Vacuum Desoldering Tool

A cheaper alternative:
RadioShack.com - Cables, Parts & Connectors: Tools & soldering equipment: Soldering tools & supplies: Desoldering Bulb

In the old days, we'd heat up the solder and then use a braided cable to suck up the solder. 60-BGA-5 | ITW CHEMTRONICS | Tools | Tools & Production Supplies | Newark

If it's solder on a connector, I hold the connector with a pair of pliers, heat up the solder, then bang the pliers on something solid with the solder connection pointed down. This forces the molten solder to leave the connector. Watch out for molten solder flying into your eyes, or putting small holes in your clothes.
I've seen the braids used before. Thanks for the tips and info
AnAverageJoe
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28th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonicdefault View Post
The best thing about solder suckers, is shootin' those little pieces of solder that have accumulated in the bulb at your friends. Kinda like metallic spitballs.
LOL is that even safe?
#49
28th September 2007
Old 28th September 2007
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Originally Posted by AnAverageJoe View Post
LOL is that even safe?
Yeah, because it cools very quickly due to the vacuum of air that surrounds it on the removal.

A $25 solder plunger-type sucker and some braid and you don't need one of the $600 vacuum units. Though they ARE really nice when you're working on console modules or hgh end, solder-waved circuit boards, they aren't needed for cable and connectors!
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28th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim vanBergen View Post
Yeah, because it cools very quickly due to the vacuum of air that surrounds it on the removal.

A $25 solder plunger-type sucker and some braid and you don't need one of the $600 vacuum units. Though they ARE really nice when you're working on console modules or hgh end, solder-waved circuit boards, they aren't needed for cable and connectors!

Hey Jim, do you know how to cook too? Because I very much suspect youre good at everything, and I need to come and be your LIFE intern, much less audio.
#51
28th September 2007
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I just soldered up some new mic cables with different kinds of solder to see if different kinds of solder made a difference in sound quality. Here is what I used:

Radio Shack rosin core 60/40 solder, 0.032” diameter, catalog # 64-009
Kester rosin core 60/40
Kester rosin core 40/60
Kester 96.5/3/0.5 Tin/Silver/Copper, water-soluble, lead-free solder
Peavey Black Widow Solder

I got some musicians and audiophiles over for a double-blind test to see if different kinds of solder sounded different.

I got a male and a female to sing through each of the cables. (Yes, I used a mic at the end of the cable!) The listeners then listened to each and tried to figure out the differences between them.

Most thought that the silver solder had a brighter high end.

Some thought that the unleaded music seemed somewhat lighter than the others.

The Peavey Black Widow had a raw, 1970s kind of sound that was great on the male voice.

The Radio Shack 60/40 was the favorite on the female singer, but some preferred the female voice through the Kester Silver/Copper solder.

Most of the folks thought I was just plain nuts.

Save this part of the thread for April Fools day, ‘cause that’s where it belongs!
#52
28th September 2007
Old 28th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnabas View Post
...Most of the folks thought I was just plain nuts.

Save this part of the thread for April Fools day, ‘cause that’s where it belongs!

Ah, so you're a trickster.
#53
28th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SixAndChange View Post
Hey Jim, do you know how to cook too? Because I very much suspect youre good at everything, and I need to come and be your LIFE intern, much less audio.
Thanks, Six. No, I can't cook. Can't fix a car, as much as THAT disturbs me, since most of them are far easier than a basic DSP algorithm or an analog compressor circuit. Too much I can't do...but I try to understand and have a good knowledge of all things audio. I'm fortunate to have done everything from designing shows on Broadway to doing stadium concerts to mixing live TV broadcasts for over 3 million viewers...all the rest of it falls in between, you know?

A lot of the mensch in me came from inspiration I got from Steve Remote about 15 years ago, who knew SO MUCH about the tiny details- how high you could run a signal into a DA-88 before clipping, why a shock rack would or would not work, when an XLR was single-ended, how a PL line had no sidetone- all as tertiary stuff to his live mixing while I A2'd for him. Once I saw someone who has such incredible knowlegde about the top, middle and bottom end of the audio spectrum, I just started working every day to educate myself and take projects where I had to learn, whether it was using the left over very expensive TV studio digital cable to make my studio snakes, to making d-subs, to repairs on everything from amps to wireless gear. It's a constant process, but I learn every day.

Of course, I make mistakes every day as well...one of the reason this forum is so very fabulous!



Enough of a hijack. I have to go custom wire a PL circuit into an automation console. In the meantime, I get to record a world premiere opera on Saturday! Believe me, the cable will be in good condition!

JvB
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28th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnabas View Post
I just soldered up some new mic cables with different kinds of solder to see if different kinds of solder made a difference in sound quality. Here is what I used:

Radio Shack rosin core 60/40 solder, 0.032” diameter, catalog # 64-009
Kester rosin core 60/40
Kester rosin core 40/60
Kester 96.5/3/0.5 Tin/Silver/Copper, water-soluble, lead-free solder
Peavey Black Widow Solder

I got some musicians and audiophiles over for a double-blind test to see if different kinds of solder sounded different.

I got a male and a female to sing through each of the cables. (Yes, I used a mic at the end of the cable!) The listeners then listened to each and tried to figure out the differences between them.

Most thought that the silver solder had a brighter high end.

Some thought that the unleaded music seemed somewhat lighter than the others.

The Peavey Black Widow had a raw, 1970s kind of sound that was great on the male voice.

The Radio Shack 60/40 was the favorite on the female singer, but some preferred the female voice through the Kester Silver/Copper solder.

Most of the folks thought I was just plain nuts.

Save this part of the thread for April Fools day, ‘cause that’s where it belongs!


This post gets my vote for best of the week.

So, has anyone ever actually compared copper and silver cables to see if there really is a difference?

AnAverageJoe
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28th September 2007
Old 28th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim vanBergen View Post
Yeah, because it cools very quickly due to the vacuum of air that surrounds it on the removal.

A $25 solder plunger-type sucker and some braid and you don't need one of the $600 vacuum units. Though they ARE really nice when you're working on console modules or hgh end, solder-waved circuit boards, they aren't needed for cable and connectors!
ok cool, thanks
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28th September 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnabas View Post
I just soldered up some new mic cables with different kinds of solder to see if different kinds of solder made a difference in sound quality. Here is what I used:

Radio Shack rosin core 60/40 solder, 0.032” diameter, catalog # 64-009
Kester rosin core 60/40
Kester rosin core 40/60
Kester 96.5/3/0.5 Tin/Silver/Copper, water-soluble, lead-free solder
Peavey Black Widow Solder

I got some musicians and audiophiles over for a double-blind test to see if different kinds of solder sounded different.

I got a male and a female to sing through each of the cables. (Yes, I used a mic at the end of the cable!) The listeners then listened to each and tried to figure out the differences between them.

Most thought that the silver solder had a brighter high end.

Some thought that the unleaded music seemed somewhat lighter than the others.

The Peavey Black Widow had a raw, 1970s kind of sound that was great on the male voice.

The Radio Shack 60/40 was the favorite on the female singer, but some preferred the female voice through the Kester Silver/Copper solder.

Most of the folks thought I was just plain nuts.

Save this part of the thread for April Fools day, ‘cause that’s where it belongs!

LOL you got me there, I was this close to spreading the news LOL
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