Not buying anything till I see the $
#61
29th December 2012
Old 29th December 2012
  #61
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Below Zero View Post
U need to watch Michael J Fox - The Secret of my Success
Yip, until you've slept with your auntie your not going to get anywhere.
7up
#62
29th December 2012
Old 29th December 2012
  #62
7up
Gear maniac
 
7up's Avatar
 

All this secrets to success stuff is great, but it's honestly just doing it.

Do you have any beats that are worthwhile? Something you really feel is a sound that could be liked? I can run it by some labels a&r if you would like.

Much love
#63
29th December 2012
Old 29th December 2012
  #63
www.KevWestBeats.com
 
KevWest's Avatar
 

random thought why not go back to having fun first and let the money come where it will.
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1
#64
29th December 2012
Old 29th December 2012
  #64
Lives for gear
 

nowadays..... most of the time you don't need to buy more stuff nomatter the $.
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2
#65
29th December 2012
Old 29th December 2012
  #65
Gear addict
 

Depending on where you live 50-70k isn't much in the U.S. In Maryland where i live 50k is median income. 50k, you'll be struggling to keep a decent apartment here, especially if you also have a car payment and student loans. 70 gets you enough income to really save for a house (20%) without being married first. This is even worse in places like NYC and San Jose, California. That's why for years a bunch of entertainers and athletes have gotten homes in Atlanta and Houston or rent there due to cheaper cost of living for the same income (that's changing though, especially Houston). Really the industry money is coming from 1. Touring 2. Merchandise 3. Publishing. As a producer, unless you sign some artists and get them deals where they're dropping singles that get solid spins you're going to miss out on a LOT of the $ from these 3 avenues. Your best bet as someone earlier mentioned is to learn an instrument extremely well, enough that you can actually perform live. That way you can get in on the show money, do session work to supplement your income, or give lessons to folks. Artists treat you very differently when they see you as a fellow musician and not another unknown producer/beatmaker, at least that's how it's been for me since I shifted over to being a guitarist. otherwise, you go the electronic/dub step direction like Diplo and Zed's Dead: produce, do killer remixes, and get a big enough buzz to do dj/beat appearances around the world at clubs.
#66
29th December 2012
Old 29th December 2012
  #66
Gear interested
 

I rarely respond to threads, but felt I could say something here.

I get where you're coming from, I've been using Fl since I was 13 when it came out in '98. I've gone through the same feelings as you until someone told me.

"Being an artist isn't a career, it's a calling".

When you start to look at it from this perspective, it's actually pretty awesome to be the old dude working at the local music store. What's the alternative being the old dude working at some really shitty job?

These kinds of old rocker dudes that never "made it" but are still rocking, I've been told are called "journeymen".

They're people that make music for the love first and are happy to make just enough to live because it allows them to make more music. It allows them to keep playing the game, keep creating art. Again what's the alternative? Not creating? A true artist cant stop creating, even if nobody's listening.

The funny thing is these types of people are becoming the go-to people we look to for in art, even in hip hop, the audience is becoming increasingly aware of rappers that are in it just for the money or are doing the bare minimal.

Why do you think we love it when Kanye blows his whole budget putting 30 people on a track?

When The Weeknd drops 3 incredible free mixtapes in one year with songs with no commercial intent?

When Macklemore funds a video about consumerism using kickstarter?

As the audience becomes more savvy it's more obvious whose in it for the art and whose in it for the money.

Now I don't want to confuse intent with making great art. You could be in it for the art only, and make terrible music. But that doesn't matter, if you're a journeymen, if you see this as your calling, than you're going to get better. That old dude that works at guitar center may never have a hit song but he can sure play the funk out of his guitar and guess what that's all that really matters.






Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie Coleman View Post
I caught myself again looking at the Prophet 08 and Virus and I was getting ready to order one of these today and I realized... What's the point? There are a million beat makers like me out there and, although I think I'm good, even the best producers out there are making chump change. 50 k a year is chump change when you spend more than 8 hours a day working in music.

I love making music but when I started making tracks in 06 I was under the impression that I was getting myself into a unique line of work. The more I learn, the more I realize how slim the chances are of me ever making a good living for myself. I consider 70k (net) a year or more to be a good income. Now, music is not everything I do, but the last few months I tried really hard to make that at least a possibility. I made a website for myself and really started working on finishing beats. I finished about 9 in a little over a month. I know I can do better.

The point is... Life is too short to spend all your time and money on a hobby that might never give you back what you put into it. I don't want to end up being the guy working at guitar center, still hoping my beats will get heard by a top dog and then I'll get my pay day.

But im not giving up. I will just keep my pockets full and until the business shows me some love, it gets no love from me. Im afraid there might be a day when ill get fed up with music and sell everything I acquired and that'll be it. But its hard to see that happening.
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3
#67
29th December 2012
Old 29th December 2012
  #67
I EAT VINYL FOR DINNER
 
MONSTA_ONE's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDadda View Post
A true artist cant stop creating, even if nobody's listening.

i like this
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1
#68
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #68
www.KevWestBeats.com
 
KevWest's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDadda View Post
I rarely respond to threads, but felt I could say something here.

I get where you're coming from, I've been using Fl since I was 13 when it came out in '98. I've gone through the same feelings as you until someone told me.

"Being an artist isn't a career, it's a calling".

When you start to look at it from this perspective, it's actually pretty awesome to be the old dude working at the local music store. What's the alternative being the old dude working at some really shitty job?

These kinds of old rocker dudes that never "made it" but are still rocking, I've been told are called "journeymen".

They're people that make music for the love first and are happy to make just enough to live because it allows them to make more music. It allows them to keep playing the game, keep creating art. Again what's the alternative? Not creating? A true artist cant stop creating, even if nobody's listening.

The funny thing is these types of people are becoming the go-to people we look to for in art, even in hip hop, the audience is becoming increasingly aware of rappers that are in it just for the money or are doing the bare minimal.

Why do you think we love it when Kanye blows his whole budget putting 30 people on a track?

When The Weeknd drops 3 incredible free mixtapes in one year with songs with no commercial intent?

When Macklemore funds a video about consumerism using kickstarter?

As the audience becomes more savvy it's more obvious whose in it for the art and whose in it for the money.

Now I don't want to confuse intent with making great art. You could be in it for the art only, and make terrible music. But that doesn't matter, if you're a journeymen, if you see this as your calling, than you're going to get better. That old dude that works at guitar center may never have a hit song but he can sure play the funk out of his guitar and guess what that's all that really matters.
someone give this man a plaque
#69
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #69
Lives for gear
 

journeymen are just people who prefer to do what they enjoy even if at the expense of their own comfort. It's a choice more than a calling.

If you are successful then it's all good, if you are not, at some point, you might not even have another choice.

But everyone would appreciate some wealth, I don't think that people don't care about it otherwise people would not have made a fuss over napster.
#70
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #70
Lives for gear
 
Goa-Dubs's Avatar
 

I dunno.Just keep on rockin.But this much is true.Theres some important stuff that needs to be attended to.Not just commercial beats.Theres enuff of that clutter around already.If you havent got something original then you got a lot of competition.If you got something original-maintain.Just dont give up the dayjob.Good luck and keep some composure and respect the other dude.

edt-ive actually just sold a lot of my gear and feel i can be successful with a minimal amount of choice stuff.Now it just a case of chiselling quality sounds and adjusting/mixing.And a short crash course in management lol
#71
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #71
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by B.A.S.E View Post
journeymen are just people who prefer to do what they enjoy even if at the expense of their own comfort. It's a choice more than a calling.
?? this is a tad blurry.....people who enjoy to do what they enjoy even if at the expense of their own comfort ?

Wouldn't doing what you enjoy be part of the sum of ones comfort ?

Not being a clown...asking a sincere question...I find your interpretation of enjoyment, comfort and choice interesting.
#72
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #72
Lives for gear
 

wtf qualifies as a "commercial" beat?

if you mean the stuff on the clearchannel/radio one "urban" stations playlist then that aint nothing to model your shit after

because most of it is trash, smoldering hot garbage

---

i'd say *if* anyone got good beats then maybe find a good rapper or whoever and try to make your own shit instead of thinking (insert big name artist here) is gonna magically find your music and drop 100 racks for it and make you famous

you'll need alot of luck, devine & nondevine intervention for shit to happen that way


there are 12 year olds on youtube calling themselves producers.. "teaching" folks how to make beats, lol


shit aint gone happen


i live in the great state of Texas, cities like Houston, Austin, Dallas used to have a signature sound... now when music drops i cant tell fhere the wuck it's from..all sounds like ATL shit

i guess they are all trying to get that "commercial" beat sound ?!@#$
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1
#73
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #73
Lives for gear
 

depending on your definition of comfort that might be blurry.. or not

At the very least, being able to eat well, have a stable home (I know people in L.A switching house every other months).. not stressing over bills etc is some part of what I call comfort.

Although it is not mutually exclusive, that notion of comfort and the journey in the music realm do seldom mix. You can do it, we have living proofs on here. But for those many that can live off it, you have a considerable ratio of people still waiting at the doors.

SO either you think that you can pull it off, because you have a "plan" (whether some superior/different skills that can be sought after, or more work capacity, or connects or whatever) . Or you are lucky. Otherwise, if you just can do what everyone can do and not in a better way, and if you are not lucky.. well then...

But everyone needs money, even tibetan monks do... Up to you to decide on the amount you need to feel comfortable...
#74
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #74
Banned
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JC Biffro View Post
The UK.

If anything, £50-100k is over doing it. £40-60 is more than enough to 'get by' (roughly $70-$90k)
I think you're grossly overvaluing the work music professionals do, and would advise you reconsider your financial goals.
#75
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #75
Lives for gear
Hey
So I think anyone trying to "make it" in music, whether as musician, artist, or producer, really has to consider themselves.

Making 50k one year is good, but life is (hopefully) long and you need a plan to build on any success you MAY have. MAY because the odds are stacked against you. One of the first few posters got it right on, to build your business (it's either a hobby or a business, it's definitely not a job unless you are making music for video games full time) you need to diversify and produce beats, make covers make videos etc, basically artist development. It's not selling out, unless you lower your standard to work with wack rappers with no skills but deep pockets... Thats a quick way to turn your love into hate.

Take a business course and then decide if the new keyboard is a good investment in your business. Or decide it's just something you want and then budget for it as a hobby, but never confuse the two, you will end up broke and unhappy. As much as we all don't want to be all about the money, you can't make beats if you get your electric cut off.

Did you know that most rich people have multiple streams of income? look at rappers too after they get big they start a clothing line.

sent from my m-3500 using the gearslutz app
#76
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #76
Banned
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by enginefire View Post
Making 50k one year is downright miraculous
ftfy

#77
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #77
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by isawsasquatch View Post
ftfy

Check your quote I never said that


sent from my m-3500 using the gearslutz app
Ronnie Coleman
Thread Starter
#78
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #78
Banned
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by isawsasquatch View Post
i like peanuts



... hey this is fun!
#79
30th December 2012
Old 30th December 2012
  #79
Gear addict
 
Led Music's Avatar
 

I learnt a valuable lesson observing my father. He's been a working musician since he was 17 and he's now coming up to 50. Through the thick and thin that's what he is. A musician. An artist. Born with a gift of creativity given by God he couldn't turn off up until this day.
Fortunately I was blessed with the same thing and decided that if I'm going to do this it's probably for life, so I might as well embrace it .
Giving up? That's a thought we've all had. Having difficult and frustrating moments in anyone's life is inescapable, but a true artist can't stop creating.
We all have different expressions and these may have to be adjusted over time.
But for me I realize it will be a lifelong investment of time and money.

Josh
7up
#80
31st December 2012
Old 31st December 2012
  #80
7up
Gear maniac
 
7up's Avatar
 

I can't help myself, all this Zen talk, exactly what most of what you are saying.

This is a music business, selling records is the *only* thing that matters. If you want to express your creativity painting is much cheaper. Most people will never even begin to contact label a&r's, most people won't goto events they frequent and try to build a relationship. If you are not getting anywhere you are wasting your time unless you consider it a hobby and *nothing* more. Nothing is going to fall in your lap.

Try to get a few meetings with some A&r's and build some friendships, then you can start talking about music.

Much love
#81
1st January 2013
Old 1st January 2013
  #81
Lives for gear
Keep in mind labels and AnRs are only a portion of the music business. If you want to be a star then yes they are the way to go. Writing music and producing sounds for licensing (tv/movies/etc) is a fine way to make a living, as is producing bands and developing artists. You will not get paid much for a lot of the work you do, but if you keep in mind that it's a business and that nothing is more valuable than your time, you will pick and choose the people you want to work with, choosing the acts that you think may pay off in the long run... Your skills are a lot more important than what keyboard you are using.

sent from my m-3500 using the gearslutz app
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1
#82
1st January 2013
Old 1st January 2013
  #82
Lives for gear
 
3rdeyeKnight's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie Coleman View Post
I have 2 degrees and I'm 26.
Slightly over a quarter time spent on this planet, and you've already made two
of the biggest power moves a young man can make. You have a bright future
ahead of you, whether you produce heat or not. Way to go.

#83
1st January 2013
Old 1st January 2013
  #83
fanned
 
dabianzo's Avatar
 

Anyone see the Jason Becker film? Talk about passion and dedication. Can you relate?

IMO if you don't have that fire burning inside of you, the one that drives you to create sounds day in and day out, then it is clear that music (in a creative sense) is not your calling. Either you feel it or you don't. If you're just chasing the idea of it (money, fame etc.), do yourself a solid and pursue something else, something more meaningful to you. While possible to make a decent living in the biz, chances are your lack of passion and dedication will be your ultimate downfall.

I laugh everytime I hear someone saying "I'm gonna be a musician!".. either you do it or you don't, simple really. And then there are those "I'm retiring from music".. I mean, aside from dying, how do you "retire" from life? I have been working with music since the age of 5 when I started learning various instruments. Every single day of my life since I have worked with music. No one forced it on me, it was already inside of me. It was a feeling of knowing that drove me to it. I had to make music and was determined to do so, no matter the cost. I begged, borrowed, worked my ass off to get where I am. Sometimes I make money, sometimes I don't. Sometimes I have a hit song, most of the time I don't. While recognition is nice, it really doesnt matter to me what others think. I make music because I have to, my life really does depend on it. End of the day, so long as I have family and friends, my tools to create, a roof and food, no matter how successful, famous, rich or whatever, I'm good.

So yeah, if you have the passion and dedication, then buy the damn gear LOL....
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1
#84
1st January 2013
Old 1st January 2013
  #84
Lives for gear
I don't think I know anyone who's gotten into music that didn't have a real passion for it... Practicing 10 hours a day year after year, eating ramen noodles and scrounging for change, sacrificing everything else for the sake of the music.

But I know A LOT of people who got out of music because of the money, either a total lack there of or they just couldn't stomach the gigs that payed. I got out too for a while only to realize that to stay somewhat sane I had to get back in.

At the end of the day no matter how passionate you are if you cant figure out a way to make it pay the bills it's just a hobby because you will be doing something else for money. It doesnt mean your music isn't art or that you are not passionate enough about it, too many musicians are lax on business because they enjoy doing what they do... And too many business owners are too wicked on musicians because they know you enjoy doing what you do.

Whether the OP should get the thing or not... He seems to be at the crossroads between hobby and profession. Get it if you have the cash and can justify the investment, otherwise just enjoy what you have already and focus on how to make your business work. A new keyboard will not make you a better musician, having some income so you can afford the time to practice and write will.

sent from my m-3500 using the gearslutz app
#85
1st January 2013
Old 1st January 2013
  #85
Lives for gear
 
Tommycash's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JC Biffro View Post
Me personally, I'd rather burn 5 years of my short life putting all my money and energy into really trying to make this a feasible career for myself, rather than looking back and thinking 'what if'.

So what if I miss 5 good years of my 20's, I'd rather that than spend the next 40 years filled with regret.
I gotta agree with that, especially after failed relationships and children that grow up to disappoint. Nobody appreciates the sacrifice and then u find yourself trying to play catch up with the career u "could've" had. I say 5 years in the studio would be time well spent. Even 10 years
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