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Creating New beat to Existing Vocals.
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Jon Young
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#1
21st September 2012
Old 21st September 2012
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Creating New beat to Existing Vocals.

A lot of times Ill make a beat, then record a hook and verses & then decide the beat could be better. My question is, as long as the new beat is in the same key and bpm will it always fit the vocals? I always find myself going back n forth between the first version of the song and the version with the new beat and can't decide which is better.

For instance, I just did a song with a melodic hook and rapped verses and I remade the beat with a more trap style drum pattern and darker melody where as the original beat had a lighter feel but both are in the same key. It shouldn't matter if its in the same key right?

Thanks for any help!
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21st September 2012
Old 21st September 2012
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A very similar concept, is labeled using the term "remix".
There are no rules, however, being in the right key helps a ton. Otherwise people probably wont listen to it.
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21st September 2012
Old 21st September 2012
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Re-Mix

When you go through 90's R&B & hip hop, the remix resembled the original quite a bit.

Usualy a main component was left identical such as the chords. With drums the pattern may be different, but the using the same kit. No actual rules but it did show a blueprint elements of the original.

It should be like the mustang. Old School & New are obviously based on same design concept.
The new one doesnt look like a corvette, but painted another color and driving the same speed. Both mustangs old/new are still based on a "parent" design.

Also, those remixes were often done by another producer not the same guy. Producer #2 had to keep the original vibe of the track, but honestly wanted to 1up & outshine the original production.

Your just dropping vocals on a tempo with a simular key. Go deeper and keep your original essence of the track.

A good test could be to send the vocal to a friend. You choose the same exact sounds for him to compose with, and keep in one major element. A fresh set of ears working with certain limits may bring you a bangin track.

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Jon Young
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21st September 2012
Old 21st September 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drethe5th View Post
Re-Mix

When you go through 90's R&B & hip hop, the remix resembled the original quite a bit.

Usualy a main component was left identical such as the chords. With drums the pattern may be different, but the using the same kit. No actual rules but it did show a blueprint elements of the original.

It should be like the mustang. Old School & New are obviously based on same design concept.
The new one doesnt look like a corvette, but painted another color and driving the same speed. Both mustangs old/new are still based on a "parent" design.

Also, those remixes were often done by another producer not the same guy. Producer #2 had to keep the original vibe of the track, but honestly wanted to 1up & outshine the original production.

Your just dropping vocals on a tempo with a simular key. Go deeper and keep your original essence of the track.

A good test could be to send the vocal to a friend. You choose the same exact sounds for him to compose with, and keep in one major element. A fresh set of ears working with certain limits may bring you a bangin track.

Posted via mobile device.
Thanks for the feedback. I always wished I had some buddies that were at least at my skill level production-wise to bounce ideas off of back n forth. But in my squad everyone else just "raps" lol. But I think that's one of my biggest problems, not having a fresh ear to possibly take a song in a new/better direction, I'm just surrounded by "yes" men.
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21st September 2012
Old 21st September 2012
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drethe5th this was not always the case. Not nearly enough to consider it a framework or rule of thumb.
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22nd September 2012
Old 22nd September 2012
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Sent from my SCH-I510
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22nd September 2012
Old 22nd September 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Young View Post
My question is, as long as the new beat is in the same key and bpm will it always fit the vocals?
I think mostly, yes. But there's the issue of how the vocals will sit with the new beat. If the vocals were performed over a strictly quantized beat, but then the new beat has a lazy, hesitating swing to it, for example, the vocals may not sit well. I would think a rapper would deliver the vocals in response to a particular beat, and if that beat goes away and something else appears, it may or may not work. Certainly having the same key and tempo gets you close, but you'll just have to try that specific beat and those particular vocals to find out.
#8
23rd September 2012
Old 23rd September 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrides View Post
drethe5th this was not always the case. Not nearly enough to consider it a framework or rule of thumb.
I agree it is not a rule of thumb. I said that in the very first part of what I wrote. There Are No Rules.

However with anything using the word "re" it usually implies that some factor of the original product, work, sound, ect . . . . . . . remains largely in tact.

When you write a paper, edit, then re-edit, you would expect that a solid base of the original be present in the final product.

When you re-model a home, you dont tear everything out, burn the house to the ground, and start over, you add, change and modify and if you check before and after photos you will still see a large presence of the older home.

Again that's USUALLY, but sometimes drastic changes are used and that's fine to, since there are no rules.
#9
25th September 2012
Old 25th September 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Young View Post
A lot of times Ill make a beat, then record a hook and verses & then decide the beat could be better. My question is, as long as the new beat is in the same key and bpm will it always fit the vocals? I always find myself going back n forth between the first version of the song and the version with the new beat and can't decide which is better.

For instance, I just did a song with a melodic hook and rapped verses and I remade the beat with a more trap style drum pattern and darker melody where as the original beat had a lighter feel but both are in the same key. It shouldn't matter if its in the same key right?

Thanks for any help!
Loving the promotion...lol...like the second guy said...same key is all you need...
#10
26th September 2012
Old 26th September 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drethe5th View Post
I agree it is not a rule of thumb. I said that in the very first part of what I wrote. There Are No Rules.

However with anything using the word "re" it usually implies that some factor of the original product, work, sound, ect . . . . . . . remains largely in tact.

When you write a paper, edit, then re-edit, you would expect that a solid base of the original be present in the final product.

When you re-model a home, you dont tear everything out, burn the house to the ground, and start over, you add, change and modify and if you check before and after photos you will still see a large presence of the older home.

Again that's USUALLY, but sometimes drastic changes are used and that's fine to, since there are no rules.
I ran with a DJ crew in the 90's and purchased more than my fair share of 12" inches with B-side remixes. Many seemed to only draw from the key and general swing. It was just as normal to find a remix that seemed to almost have nothing to do with original, in hip-hop.

Maybe you are including r&b and EDM. I would agree with you 100% in those genres. Not so much for hip hop. I found many wtf moments over the years. some great, some..meh.
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