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Jeremih - "Down On Me" - Question to Ken
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edneysis
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#1
22nd January 2011
Old 22nd January 2011
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Jeremih - "Down On Me" - Question to Ken

Hey Ken,

Today i found somewhere on GS that you mixed "Down On Me" so i decided to listen closer what's going on. Man this mix is incredible, the dynamics of all drums & perc pieces is wonderful, and space in this track ......WOW!!
I just wonder what U use in , what reverbs (is it lexicon pcm native?) , eq , compressors , is it OTB or ITB ? I'm very curious because i'm shocked what i heard
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22nd January 2011
Old 22nd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edneysis View Post
Hey Ken,

Today i found somewhere on GS that you mixed "Down On Me" so i decided to listen closer what's going on. Man this mix is incredible, the dynamics of all drums & perc pieces is wonderful, and space in this track ......WOW!!
I just wonder what U use in , what reverbs (is it lexicon pcm native?) , eq , compressors , is it OTB or ITB ? I'm very curious because i'm shocked what i heard
Glad you liked the mix. i used alot of efx on this mix. some really subtle, some really noticeable. All the reverbs were Lexicon PCM native plugins. I used 4 different Lex verbs. I also used Sound toys time blender, Echoboy, Eventide Factory, Digi Long Delay, Short delay, and Extra Long delay, GRM Tools. Thats the EFX side of things. Without recalling the whole mix i cant remember if i used my reaL EMT 140 plate.

I mixed this on an SSL using a combination of plugins and console, but everything went thru the SSL. I almost never mix in the box and would only do so for a very specific reason as i generally do not like mixing ITB at all.

The session itself was pretty massive, somewhere around 100 tracks. I know it sounds simple, but there's alot going on.

One of 50's verses was recorded here during the mix, everything else was recorded elsewhere. I used a C800G thru a Groove Tubes Vipre pre with a Thermionic Culture Phoenix compressor. Cant remember if i used EQ while tracking.

if you have VERY specific questions i'll try to answer them, but this mix was extensive, to try to describe it on a global scale would be really difficult beyond what i've already done.

-Ken
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22nd January 2011
Old 22nd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
GRM Tools
I knew you were a GRM tools user, I bought you mixing style to a local engineer attention (my homeboy used to track at his place), basically we played one of your mixes to him and said "that's the sound we want". Dude impressed me cause he managed to reproduce an fx you used with GRM tools (he really reproduced the exact same effect, some kind or granular reversed delay, at least it sounds like it)... Since then dude really improved his mixing skills, he mixed something like 6 or 8 track on my homeboy project and the mixes are awesome! a couple of years ago we used to get wack mixes from him, now he's getting really good. I beleive you inspired that guy.lol
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22nd January 2011
Old 22nd January 2011
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Originally Posted by Nahuel View Post
I knew you were a GRM tools user, I bought you mixing style to a local engineer attention (my homeboy used to track at his place), basically we played one of your mixes to him and said "that's the sound we want". Dude impressed me cause he managed to reproduce an fx you used with GRM tools (he really reproduced the exact same effect, some kind or granular reversed delay, at least it sounds like it)... Since then dude really improved his mixing skills, he mixed something like 6 or 8 track on my homeboy project and the mixes are awesome! a couple of years ago we used to get wack mixes from him, now he's getting really good. I beleive you inspired that guy.lol
Yeah, i'm not gonna tell you what i do with GRM some sounds i've created on my own i think are fairly unique, and my GRM stuff is one of them. and you guessed wrong. However, its always nice to hear i'm inspiring other mixers and people who have a passion for music, recording, producing etc...

your friends effect sounds like its pretty damn cool though, he should post it up here. ya'll can share your techniques too ya know. I post up some of my stuff in hopes of hearing what you guys have going on. Hey, i'll take new things to try wherever i can find them.
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22nd January 2011
Old 22nd January 2011
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Thanks Ken for responding my topic!!

"if you have VERY specific questions i'll try to answer them" ...hell yeah i got some question..


I mix music for a long time but i'm mixing only ITB i don't have chance to sit in a front of SSL :( , and i don't know am i write... i compare my mixes to other comercial mixes (Like yours) and i can't make that superb smooth & space in tracks... for example your tracks are bright , very wide and smooth at the same time...when i'm mixing a just feel that everything is too much in my face. Is it that console make tracks smoothe and separate , is there any chance to get this effect ITB without any hardware stuff??


"Down on me'" is pretty stereo wide , are you using some stereo enhancers plugins or those things you leave for mastering process??

can u tell me what are your fav compressors plugs??
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22nd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
Yeah, i'm not gonna tell you what i do with GRM some sounds i've created on my own i think are fairly unique, and my GRM stuff is one of them. and you guessed wrong. However, its always nice to hear i'm inspiring other mixers and people who have a passion for music, recording, producing etc...

your friends effect sounds like its pretty damn cool though, he should post it up here. ya'll can share your techniques too ya know. I post up some of my stuff in hopes of hearing what you guys have going on. Hey, i'll take new things to try wherever i can find them.
Really? OK, it sounded so similar I would have sworn it was the same effect, I'll give him a call, I'll try to bring him here or at least I'll ask what GRM plug he used and the exact settings.
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22nd January 2011
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I'm constantly blown away by the amount of work and different effects etc that go into what sounds like a simple track. I'm not calling bad or good. Just interesting. I would imagine that its changes and things that I wouldn't hear or could ever imagine making to the mix.

This is a good reminder to me.
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23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edneysis View Post
Thanks Ken for responding my topic!!

"if you have VERY specific questions i'll try to answer them" ...hell yeah i got some question..


I mix music for a long time but i'm mixing only ITB i don't have chance to sit in a front of SSL :( , and i don't know am i write... i compare my mixes to other comercial mixes (Like yours) and i can't make that superb smooth & space in tracks... for example your tracks are bright , very wide and smooth at the same time...when i'm mixing a just feel that everything is too much in my face. Is it that console make tracks smoothe and separate , is there any chance to get this effect ITB without any hardware stuff??
While i will not dismiss the importance of having quality gear to mix on, I'd say the majority of what you describe liking in this song has to do with how its put together, not what its put together with. I've heard alot of ITB mixes that i think sound great. I won 2 Grammy's for ITB mixes. Personally i find it a bit frustrating to mix ITB unless the source material was recorded and structured very well. Its certainly possible to do excellent ITB stuff, to me its just a harder process, especially when you have a 100 track mix.



Quote:
Originally Posted by edneysis View Post
"Down on me'" is pretty stereo wide , are you using some stereo enhancers plugins or those things you leave for mastering process??
I dont remember but sometimes i widen things with BX Digital. Mastering guys often widen things a bit as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edneysis View Post
can u tell me what are your fav compressors plugs??
The WAVES Eddie Kramer PIE compressor is ridiculous. The new Slate F-GX is amazing on mix bus. Here's a list of other compressor plugins i use on the regular for various things....

IK Multimedia T Racks 670 Vintage compressor
Massey L2007
WAVES REN VOX
WAVES CLA 76
WAVES CLA-3A
EMI TG 12413 1969 (Vocal Peak Limiter setting)
Omnipressor (especially for really fast and / or brutal compression)
URS 1970 CLS
WAVES V-Comp
JOEMEEK Compressor

I certainly use several others, but these are mainstays i think. I also use some outboard compressors, SSL Channel compressors, Distressor, Manley Vari Mu and the Thermionic Culture Phoenix all get regular use here.
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23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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Originally Posted by Nahuel View Post
Really? OK, it sounded so similar I would have sworn it was the same effect, I'll give him a call, I'll try to bring him here or at least I'll ask what GRM plug he used and the exact settings.
if he posts his settings up here, i'll tell you if he's right.
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23rd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayl View Post
I'm constantly blown away by the amount of work and different effects etc that go into what sounds like a simple track. I'm not calling bad or good. Just interesting. I would imagine that its changes and things that I wouldn't hear or could ever imagine making to the mix.

This is a good reminder to me.
i think the old saying "You dont know what you dont know" applies. There are just so many things about mixing that you cant learn in books or on a forum, and nothing can replace experience. Its one thing to know a bunch of techniques. Its quite another to know when do use what, to be able to listen and hear in your head where you want to take it and work with it until its what you want. I have a quote on my website that i love from Michelangelo........

"I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free."

Thats a good description of what mixing is often like.
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23rd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edneysis View Post
i can't make that superb smooth & space in tracks... for example your tracks are bright , very wide and smooth at the same time...when i'm mixing a just feel that everything is too much in my face. Is it that console make tracks smoothe and separate , is there any chance to get this effect ITB without any hardware stuff??
From my experience, what you are describing is the sounding of running the tracks through a console / analog summing / saturation. I know, because I've spent the last year or so searching for it myself. You can get extremely close with the right processing ITB. PM me if you want me to run sample tracks for you.
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23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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My stepson was wearing this song out a few weeks ago. I had no idea you mixed it. It sounds really good! I always have a hard time identifying where the original production ended and the mix begins without the before and after but maybe that's my lack of mix knowledge. I guess my question would be...given that you're working with such a high level of talent...artists and producers...how good is most of the production before you mix it, this song included? I only ask because in my "limited" experience with upper level talent...it usually sounds great before mix. On the flip side...there are fairly new producers placing tracks at the highest levels and there's just no way they could be accomplishing the level of quality without a great mix engineer making this happen. Outside looking in of course...I think my question is better phrased like this:

How much effort do you put into getting a productions mix "to the level" so to speak, before you can really take it to the next level? Or is most of it "at the level" and you can spend most of your time being inventive?

Either way....Ken...you're a class act for all these jewels you drop here. Much continued success!
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23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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Ken Lewis to my understanding you didn't produce that song. How was the track given to you? was it already partially mixed or did you basically start fresh with each sound and just 're-do' the producers work but just fine-tune it to a commercial release level? Im very interested in this creative process
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23rd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidwave View Post
Ken Lewis to my understanding you didn't produce that song. How was the track given to you? was it already partially mixed or did you basically start fresh with each sound and just 're-do' the producers work but just fine-tune it to a commercial release level? Im very interested in this creative process
As far as the mix, i started from scratch, though i had a stereo rough mix as a basic guide. A rough mix is valuable because it gives you the basic idea of how the producer wants things balanced. Maybe sound A is really loud and the driving force of the song, while sound D is mono, panned to the left and just ear candy. Rough mix is just like a basic road map

But i'm not sure if i'm understanding you correctly. I didnt create a single note on this song, i only mixed it. i didnt re-do the producers work at all. The song was pretty well put together from a production and performance standpoint, i juist had to take what was given to me and make it sound as big and radio ready as possible.
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23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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Originally Posted by Stoneface View Post
How much effort do you put into getting a productions mix "to the level" so to speak, before you can really take it to the next level? Or is most of it "at the level" and you can spend most of your time being inventive?
This is a hard one to answer effectively because it goes back to every mix being a unique challenge and set of circumstances. Some producers deliver excellent productions with good rough mixes, some, even big producers, deliver horrible rough mixes or none at all. Sometimes a production is really well thought out, sometimes nothing is labeled, sounds clash horribly, things are out of time, bad edits with pops and clicks, etc... all depends.

As far as time spent on what when i mix, i spend as much time as it takes to deliver a great mix. So, if i have to sort thru ish for a couple hours before i can focus on getting more creative, then i do.

One thing i dont do is fix really bad stuff. If you want your singer to vomit all over a track and expect me to clean up the notes for you, nope. I'll tune vocals in a mix only as far as what autotune will correct without sounding like T Pain. if it needs melodyne it goes back to my client to be fixed. Just did that on a song this week. Now, sometimes drums are a different story. If you deliver a song to be mixed with weak ass drums, i'll probably layer in my own to make theirs feel and hit the way i need them to, but they'll still sound like the drums that i received, only wayyyy better. there's no one path, which is what makes experience so important.

each mix is a different set of challenges. Knowing how to solve each one of them well, while at the same time focusing on making it sound like a finished SONG, thats the trick. Not just a hot beat with crappy sounding vocals, or a great vocal sound thats 20 dB louder than the music.
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23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
This is a hard one to answer effectively because it goes back to every mix being a unique challenge and set of circumstances. Some producers deliver excellent productions with good rough mixes, some, even big producers, deliver horrible rough mixes or none at all. Sometimes a production is really well thought out, sometimes nothing is labeled, sounds clash horribly, things are out of time, bad edits with pops and clicks, etc... all depends.

As far as time spent on what when i mix, i spend as much time as it takes to deliver a great mix. So, if i have to sort thru ish for a couple hours before i can focus on getting more creative, then i do.

One thing i dont do is fix really bad stuff. If you want your singer to vomit all over a track and expect me to clean up the notes for you, nope. I'll tune vocals in a mix only as far as what autotune will correct without sounding like T Pain. if it needs melodyne it goes back to my client to be fixed. Just did that on a song this week. Now, sometimes drums are a different story. If you deliver a song to be mixed with weak ass drums, i'll probably layer in my own to make theirs feel and hit the way i need them to, but they'll still sound like the drums that i received, only wayyyy better. there's no one path, which is what makes experience so important.

each mix is a different set of challenges. Knowing how to solve each one of them well, while at the same time focusing on making it sound like a finished SONG, thats the trick. Not just a hot beat with crappy sounding vocals, or a great vocal sound thats 20 dB louder than the music.
Ken - I love this mix. I have a couple of questions in this respect around the drum mix in particular.

1) There is what sounds like a tom like sound that enters and leaves the track. What I am interested in is how you managed to make this prominent at times and at other times just move the song along. I hope this makes sense.

2) Second is a lot more interesting! It relates to the long 808 downward moving hits that occur. I noticed on my headphones how they were subtle yet audible. It worked well. I then sat in my car which is equipped with a decent system including a 12" sub which as we all know brings the bass right up into the forefront. What astonished me is how the 808 was hitting so hard without causing any issues with the kick and 'tom like sound'. How did you approach the very low end in the track? Was a sub used in monitoring those lower two octaves? How did you create space with a driving kick and very dominating 808 sample?

Cheers in advance.
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23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
As far as the mix, i started from scratch, though i had a stereo rough mix as a basic guide. A rough mix is valuable because it gives you the basic idea of how the producer wants things balanced. Maybe sound A is really loud and the driving force of the song, while sound D is mono, panned to the left and just ear candy. Rough mix is just like a basic road map

But i'm not sure if i'm understanding you correctly. I didnt create a single note on this song, i only mixed it. i didnt re-do the producers work at all. The song was pretty well put together from a production and performance standpoint, i juist had to take what was given to me and make it sound as big and radio ready as possible.
yep, that's what i was asking. that's very interesting..
i always suspected a very thin line between a producer and an engineer (in terms of releasing a song to the public) but I'm starting to see a wide disparity in roles in the creative process.

in my opinion its a lot more time consuming to mix a song than make a template of a beat. somebody like your client kanye west can "create" a beat in literally seconds and make a four minute track, but it's the engineers job to perfect it bar-by-bar with the vocals, etc. But if he didn't have you, could he do it on his own? I guess producers (espetially sample based) have that talent to create and have that ear for samples, but the mixers job is much, much more technical (and those don't really overlap)

with that said, do you ever mix tracks that you think just isn't "good music?" I'll be honest and say "down on me" isn't my typical cup of tea when looking for good tracks to play at my leisure, but if I was an engineer I'd see it as more of a project. do you EVER provide any creative input? obviously that's the job for the artist, but you've worked with so many acclaimed artists that it wouldn't hurt to ask?

anyways, kudos to you, you've worked with TONS of great acts
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23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
This is a hard one to answer effectively because it goes back to every mix being a unique challenge and set of circumstances.....
Thanks Ken...I think that answers it and then some. Much appreciated!
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23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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Originally Posted by kidwave View Post
yep, that's what i was asking. that's very interesting..
i always suspected a very thin line between a producer and an engineer (in terms of releasing a song to the public) but I'm starting to see a wide disparity in roles in the creative process.

in my opinion its a lot more time consuming to mix a song than make a template of a beat. somebody like your client kanye west can "create" a beat in literally seconds and make a four minute track, but it's the engineers job to perfect it bar-by-bar with the vocals, etc. But if he didn't have you, could he do it on his own? I guess producers (espetially sample based) have that talent to create and have that ear for samples, but the mixers job is much, much more technical (and those don't really overlap)

with that said, do you ever mix tracks that you think just isn't "good music?" I'll be honest and say "down on me" isn't my typical cup of tea when looking for good tracks to play at my leisure, but if I was an engineer I'd see it as more of a project. do you EVER provide any creative input? obviously that's the job for the artist, but you've worked with so many acclaimed artists that it wouldn't hurt to ask?

anyways, kudos to you, you've worked with TONS of great acts

OK...... NEW RULE OF THIS THREAD. YOU CANNOT ASK ME A QUESTION UNLESS YOU FIRST POST UP A TECHNIQUE OF YOUR OWN. I DONT CARE WHAT IT IS. I WILL NOT ANSWER YOUR QUESTION IF YOU DONT. I WILL IF YOU DO. SHARE PEOPLE!!!


Now, to answer your question (though i expect you to post a technique retroactively......)

I can only speak from personal experience. But when i am hired to be a musician, or an engineer, or a mixer or anything other than to produce, then my mission is to deliver to the producer and artist what their vision of the song is. My job is not to assume role of producer and reshape it in my own vision. If i think i have a great production idea in the mix, i will let them hear it and see what they think, but only in a non confrontational way that hopefully lets them know that i'm not trying to do their job, but instead to make them look like an even better producer. And if they dont like it, i change it to what they do like.

Conversely, if i'm producing and i hire someone to play a role in my record, i expect the same from them. As a producer, its my job to guide the ship creatively, and to draw everybody's best talents and best efforts out of them, but to also steer the ship where i want it to go. Nobody does this better than Kanye in my opinion. He surrounds himself with amazingly talented people, gives them his vision, and expects everyone to bring their own talents to the table to fully realize his vision. This is production.

As a mix engineer i try to envision what the producer and artist would want this to sound like on the radio if they had my abilities as a mixer. Sure, i bring new ideas to the table, but the producer is the creative guide.

In the case of "Down On Me", the only real interaction i had with the producer was hearing his rough mix and seeing what was laid out in front of me on the tracks. I didnt have any creative conversation with him. However, 50 Cent was at the entire mix session from beginning to end, right behind me, listening. He didnt offer much mix input, however, i'm sure he would have if he didnt like the direction it was going, and he was very happy with the final mix. Having him in the room definitely helped the vibe of the session. Who knows if it would have been the same mix without him there.
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23rd January 2011
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Ok, I didnt call my friend yet (been working all day long, I'll try to call him tomorrow) but I'll share something in hope you all do the same so we can keep Ken ansewring this thread.

It's a sound design technique, I probably mentioned it previousely on GS but hey I beleive it's kind of original and interesting.

"How to create original and "unique" textures/ single looped tones to feed your sampler" (the kind of stuff you'd want to play melodies with a la synth patch)

-DL melodyne demo (if you own melodyne it's even better, I dont, I use the demo, it's free, legal and works wonders) intall etc...

-choose some musical peice, I found that classical music works very well for this but you can use whatever, something that sounds interesting to your ears...

-transfet the part you choosed in melodyne

-click on the notes dipalyed in melodyne interface and hear the amazing looped tones you get, you'll noticen that the tones might change depending in where you click (at the beginning of the note it might sound different than at the end of it, try it).

-Sample a tone you like

-load it in you sampler and enjoy the unique instrument you just "created"
#21
23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nahuel View Post
Ok, I didnt call my friend yet (been working all day long, I'll try to call him tomorrow) but I'll share something in hope you all do the same so we can keep Ken ansewring this thread.

It's a sound design technique, I probably mentioned it previousely on GS but hey I beleive it's kind of original and interesting.

"How to create original and "unique" textures/ single looped tones to feed your sampler" (the kind of stuff you'd want to play melodies with a la synth patch)

-DL melodyne demo (if you own melodyne it's even better, I dont, I use the demo, it's free, legal and works wonders) intall etc...

-choose some musical peice, I found that classical music works very well for this but you can use whatever, something that sounds interesting to your ears...

-transfet the part you choosed in melodyne

-click on the notes dipalyed in melodyne interface and hear the amazing looped tones you get, you'll noticen that the tones might change depending in where you click (at the beginning of the note it might sound different than at the end of it, try it).

-Sample a tone you like

-load it in you sampler and enjoy the unique instrument you just "created"
HOT! Can you post a before / after mp3? I'd love to hear what you are getting out of this technique. Thanks very much for sharing. -Ken
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23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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Damn it Ken! Good one!

I owe you one for answering my question. Been trying to think of something...almost rather be in your shoes and just field specific questions. It seems much easier....

I'll think of something though...I always pay my debts.
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23rd January 2011
Old 23rd January 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
HOT! Can you post a before / after mp3? I'd love to hear what you are getting out of this technique. Thanks very much for sharing. -Ken
Of course, here's an example, I did this real quick so the result aint mind blowing by any means but hopefully it will give you an idea. You have the sample, some generated tones, a "musical" idea using one of the generated tones.
Attached Files
File Type: mp3 sample example.mp3 (183.7 KB, 1439 views)
File Type: mp3 tones examples.mp3 (5.47 MB, 1561 views)
File Type: mp3 beat example.mp3 (865.3 KB, 1417 views)
#24
24th January 2011
Old 24th January 2011
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Alright...hope this counts. If not, let me know. I don't have any great mixing technics as I'm a programmer first and most of my production is pretty straight forward. That being said...hope someone gets something out of this.

Key Changes and Arrangement with Elastic Audio

This is a trick that I use alot when I've already got a beat tracked as audio. It usually comes during the arrangement phase and at some point you realize, "Hey a key change would be great right here." But, I may not feel like going back into my sequencer and dealing with the midi. I'm already in a groove with the audio.

I'll use the track in my signature as I know for certain, that's how I created this specific key change. I won't go into detail about how to setup elastic audio...there are plenty of videos out there for that. So let's assume your session is already set up to make the changes.

1. Identify where you want the key change and highlight all relevant tracks. We won't be pitching the drums just all the other melodic parts. I setup in polyphonic mode for this.

2. Figure out the key you want to go to. Again, if you don't know what key you need to go to...just trial and error adjusting the pitch until you find what works. I doesn't have to be rocket science, just use your ears.

3. Once you have the key, the trick is to make it blend smoothly with the track. For our example...what I did was break down most of the drums and instrumentation just before the key change and utilized only one of the string part to "lead" me into the key change while leaving only few parts playing because making a key change with nothing to "announce" that it's coming, can sound very unnatural and sudden. So at about the 2:30-2:35 mark you will hear this breakdown and the individual string part, playing the notes that "lead" into the key change. The rest of the parts stayed the same or were cut out altogether.

4. This approach also forced me to add more instrumentation to the track because I wasen't getting the proper buildup to really make the key change work. If you start at about 1:45, this is the second verse. You'll notice that a bassoon was added and was done so, to begin building energy for the key change. This lead to additional strings parts and a high pitched string in the second half of the chorus (~2:25) that brought additional energy and allowed me to simply utilize the same high string patch on the key change simply making the key adjustment to help tie it together. This is all done to make the transition sound more natural and keep the flow going.

5. It's also important to understand that with chord progressions, they need to resolve. In this particular incident I was having a VERY hard time getting the notes right out of the key change and back home again...so what did I do? I cheated. You'll notice that right after the key change, I basically just dropped you off a cliff...and brought it home with a simple drum breakdown and let your imagination fill in the gap. Technically I suppose music theory majors will flame me for that but I think in this instance it works and it flows pretty well. That being said, you can utilize elastic audio in the same way, to come back out of a key change as well.

6. The last tip I can think of is on arranging itself. What I usually try to do since I don't work with vocalists often during track creation, is to use accapellas and arrange around that vocal. This not only gives me a good starting point in the arrangement but it also let's me know if the track is produced to the point that it can handle the "weight" of a vocal. There used to be a common statement people would make, called Over-Produced. It's just my opinion but I've never agreed with that term. It's not possible to over-produce a track, but it is possible to under arrange a track. So if you hear that phrase used to describe one of your tracks...spend more time getting your arrangement right.

In closing, it's pretty easy to find new keys with elastic audio. It's an amazing tool and it's super fast. Just be sure to listen to the individual parts that you've pitch shifted to make sure the process hasen't completely garbled any of your audio tracks. I don't know if anyone will find this useful but please know that I did try. If you have any specific questions, please PM me so as not to high jack this thread.
#25
24th January 2011
Old 24th January 2011
  #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
OK...... NEW RULE OF THIS THREAD. YOU CANNOT ASK ME A QUESTION UNLESS YOU FIRST POST UP A TECHNIQUE OF YOUR OWN. I DONT CARE WHAT IT IS. I WILL NOT ANSWER YOUR QUESTION IF YOU DONT. I WILL IF YOU DO. SHARE PEOPLE!!!
ROFL!!! this is an actual LOL. Fair call mate hahahaha
#26
24th January 2011
Old 24th January 2011
  #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nahuel View Post
Of course, here's an example, I did this real quick so the result aint mind blowing by any means but hopefully it will give you an idea. You have the sample, some generated tones, a "musical" idea using one of the generated tones.
woah, that beat example is kinda hot. Is all of the melodic sound on that from that orchestral sample being warped?
#27
24th January 2011
Old 24th January 2011
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Stoneface,
I thought Elastic Audio was only for stretching audio, i had no idea it did key changes. thank you so much for enlightening me. I'm gonna use this.
#28
24th January 2011
Old 24th January 2011
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
woah, that beat example is kinda hot. Is all of the melodic sound on that from that orchestral sample being warped?
lol, your way too kind, thank you, yes it's the "waveform" that plays at 1'31'' in the "tones examples". File loaded in the sampler, mapped across the keyboard, HPF engaged, a touch of resonance, glide enabled, touch of delay.

I beleive you can get nicer tones/textures with the right source, I made some sort of deep "brass patch" with this once that sounded kinda cool but I didnt manage to find it on my HD. I guess that trick could be nice for someone looking for "unheard" waveforms.
#29
24th January 2011
Old 24th January 2011
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
Stoneface,
I thought Elastic Audio was only for stretching audio, i had no idea it did key changes. thank you so much for enlightening me. I'm gonna use this.
I think Ken's making fun of me...
#30
24th January 2011
Old 24th January 2011
  #30
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l in the marble and carved until I set him free."

I just wanted to give thanx for the quote... very inspired way to explain it..


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