Upward compression
Old 4th February 2010
  #1
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Upward compression

Upward compression....when, where and why do you use it or not use it? just curious....thanks.
Old 4th February 2010
  #2
Lives for gear
 

sometimes... to get some dynamics ''back'' on squashed drum loops.
Old 4th February 2010
  #3
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by beat you down View Post
sometimes... to get some dynamics ''back'' on squashed drum loops.

Your thinking of an upward expander which takes high level passages and brings them up furthur. An Upward compressor raises the level of low passages.

I believe the results are similar to parellel compression but achieved in a different way....i could be off on that one.
Old 4th February 2010
  #4
Lives for gear
 

expander yes sorry
Old 4th February 2010
  #5
3 + infractions, forum membership suspended.
 

Old 4th February 2010
  #6
Lives for gear
 
pasarski's Avatar
 

Don't use it, but I use gate.
Old 4th February 2010
  #7
Lives for gear
 
12ax7's Avatar
 

Shhh...

ADR Compex.

(The expander in it is actually USEFUL for something besides a gate!)


Old 5th February 2010
  #8
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Quote:

Thnx mikey but i understood that much already.....i was just wondering if anyone actually uses it and how/why they choose to?

Am i wrong to believe its different than parellel compression? I thought it was to get almost the same results but through altering one waveform instead of combining two waveforms like with parellel...
Old 5th February 2010
  #9
Audio Alchemist
 
Lagerfeldt's Avatar
It's not the same as parallel compression though it can produce a somewhat similar sounding result.

In parallel compression you're basically squashing a signal and adding it to your original signal either on a parallel track or directly in a machine or plug-in using a mix or dry/wet knob.


Top: Original waveform
Middle: Parallel compressed result
Bottom: Regular compressed result (shabby job, I admit!) :-)

Notice how the middle result (parallel compressed) maintains the original peaks of the signal but adds fullness from the bottom and up, so to speak.

One of the benefits of parallel compression is that you're not touching the transients of the original signal. You can also further process the parallel signal with EQ or distortion for more radical effects. Mind the phase, so you may consider using linear phase EQ and full ADC/PDC in your DAW.

With upward compression or de-expansion (as used in the Flux plug-in Solera and Alchemist) you're processing directly on the original signal, bringing up the low level information.

The most interesting use of de-expansion is in the Flux Syrah which has the potential for threshold independent de-expansion. This is practically achieved by setting the Amount and Thickness parameter for 100%. I then recommend adding the result in parallel within the plug-in for a more subtle effect and more user control. I've written a guide somewhere on GS for that trick and it's included in the plug-in as the presets called Parallel Enhancer Soft & Loud. It sounds advanced (and it is) but not for the user, so check it out!

In the Flux Solera and Alchemist it's completely user controllable including both a ratio and range option as well as the threshold, of course. You can not underestimate how powerful that combo is since it allows you to potentially use high ratios in combination with low threshold (which would normally produce lots of gain changes) but keep the actual gain range to e.g. 2 dB using the range knob.
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