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TheMandalaVirus
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23rd June 2011
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Eric Valentine and New Taking Back Sunday self titled

Taking Back Sundays new self titled album is now streaming on their facebook page. I personally believe this album sets a new sonic standard in music. I'm curious is Eric Valentine used his new console on this album? I'm excited to see if Eric will post on here and share some stories/thoughts/techniques on this record.
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28th June 2011
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Yeah! I just bought the album and it sounds great! He's definitely got a very signature drum tone. I wonder if he (or anyone who knows) would like to talk about how he does that kind of scooped sound on the kick and snare. It's really unique for the genre and it totally works.
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28th June 2011
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He did, in fact, use his new console. You can see it on TBS' website in the photos section. Super pumped to grab this after work. Ive heard El Paso already, and im loving it. Im also seeing them this sunday at Summerfest in Milwaukee, WI. Gonna be awesome. Also seeing Third Eye Blind on Friday there, which coincidentally had their first album produced by Eric which turned me on to him in the first place, because it is one of the best sounding albums of all time.
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28th June 2011
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Would love some info on this album as well, Eric Valentine is an audio magician.
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2nd July 2011
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Speaking of drum tones.... track 9 "Since You've Been Gone" has the best drum tone I've ever heard. I've read many Eric Valentine forums and he offered up a lot of really amazing information. I'm curious if/when he will get his console on the market.
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11th July 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMandalaVirus View Post
Taking Back Sundays new self titled album is now streaming on their facebook page. I personally believe this album sets a new sonic standard in music. I'm curious is Eric Valentine used his new console on this album? I'm excited to see if Eric will post on here and share some stories/thoughts/techniques on this record.
Hey,

Happy to hear some folks are enjoying the new TBS record! I did in fact use the Undertone Console on the record. It was the first full project done entirely on one of the new UTA consoles.

Let me know if there are any specific details about the TBS record you are interested and I will be happy to post the info here while its still fresh in my brain!

Thanks!

Eric Valentine
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11th July 2011
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Eric Valentine and New Taking Back Sunday self titled

Would you talk about the drums and guitar sounds. Everything Is huge like beyond big but not harsh at all. How do you do that in the cymbals and gtrs. Where they seem just enormous but the 3-5k range isn't killing you but is def. There.

Any tips for the vocal and bass sounds?

You have made a great record. Your a huge influence my man.

Have a great day!

Rick Carson
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11th July 2011
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Real drums are back!
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11th July 2011
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Eric Valentine and New Taking Back Sunday self titled

No samples at all? I thought they sounded real! Can you talk about how you utilize gates?
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11th July 2011
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Ps. I'm just assuming they're real, I only had a quick listen to the itunes snippets on mid level headphones.
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11th July 2011
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Eric.


Thanks soo much for answering some questions. Been listening to this latest Taking Back Sunday alot the last few weeks. Sounds incredible. Especially been loving the drums, as i'm sure everyone else here has.

I know you've elaborated in the past about your drum recording technique. Is there anything about this particular record that u did different? Would also love to know a little more about your distressors on the drums! is it a parallel bus? Are the distressors giving you that unique attack that seems to be consistent on the TBS records?

In a video on the TBS website, I saw Adam singing into an SM7 without the pop screen on it. Was this the vocal mic used for the whole record? any comp to "tape/pro tools"?

Thanks again man. Big inspiration here.

kp
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11th July 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bwrecordings View Post
Would you talk about the drums and guitar sounds. Everything Is huge like beyond big but not harsh at all. How do you do that in the cymbals and gtrs. Where they seem just enormous but the 3-5k range isn't killing you but is def. There.

Any tips for the vocal and bass sounds?

You have made a great record. Your a huge influence my man.

Have a great day!

Rick Carson
Sure,

Despite my effort to do something distinctly different with the drums this time around, they seem to have ended up pretty close to what I usually get. I guess, if you put the same drummer in the same room with the same guy recording them it is going to be pretty similar. I did actually rent drums for this project and intentionally did not use stuff from my stable of drums. I have been using the same collection of drums for a long time on a huge variety of projects from Smash Mouth to QOTSA to Maroon 5 to Good Charlotteā€¦. basically anything I have recorded over the last 10 years. I think a change was overdue at this point.

I rented drums from the Drum Doctor. We went to his warehouse and picked out some really unique stuff. The kick drum in particular was really cool. It is a 26" Gretsch that is very shallow. I find that shallower kick drums naturally have more of that mid rangy knock to them. My preference with kick drums is to make sure the sound has lots of natural attack in the sound more than it having a huge amount of low end. It always seems easier/more natural sounding for me to manufacture low end with EQ than it is to try and manufacture high end attack with EQ.

There were several different setups used on the record. Here is a picture of the spread sheet we used for calling out mics/pres/tie lines etc. in the main setup for most of the big rock stuff on the record.



As you can see there are a lot of different sources for the kick drumā€¦ that's just me being indecisive It did give me some great options when mixing. I was able to voice the kick drum slightly differently depending on how things got layered on top of it. Mark is one of the hardest hitting drummers I have recorded. He's a big guy, he uses large drum sticks and playing hard is a big part of how he feels what he is playing. When drummers play that hard it can limit what mics are usable in particular positions. It tends to force me to use dynamics in the close positions because some of my favorite condensers or ribbon mics just can't handle it. Sometimes it works out for the best because dynamic mics tend to have a very close up in your face quality to them that can be helpful for getting the drums to cut through a wall of guitars.

The entire record was recorded directly to Pro Tools. I did actually monitor with HEAT while tracking. It was helpful for me because it did sound a bit more familiar (analog tape-esque) while tracking. Ultimately, when mixing I turned HEAT off and transferred everything to a studer A800 mkIII 24 track and an Ampex MM1200 16 track.

I want to check my mix notes to see where samples were used. On this project, I always started each mix with no samples on the drums and then only added them if I wasn't getting what I wanted out of the original recording. I am pretty sure I only used samples on a few songs, but I want to check my mix notes to be sure.

I am traveling back to LA today and will be able to post more info this evening.

Thanks for the interest!

EV
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11th July 2011
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Yet another thread in the "GS is awesome" pile!
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11th July 2011
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Eric,
Thanks for taking the time out of your presumably hectic schedule to help us mere mortals get some insight into how the masters work.
My question is not so much about the sounds, but more about the process of making the album. In what order were the instruments tracked? Did anybody play along during basics, or just drums to a click/scratch track. Bass before guitars, or vice versa? How long would you say you guys spent per day/per week on the project, and how long total did it take?

Thanks again!

Drew Palasini
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12th July 2011
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Eric Valentine and New Taking Back Sunday self titled

Thanks so much!

57 #7? is it modded or just special? Can you talk about the placement of the two sets of room mics and really about all of it!
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12th July 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpalasini View Post
because it is one of the best sounding albums of all time.


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12th July 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bwrecordings View Post
No samples at all? I thought they sounded real! Can you talk about how you utilize gates?
I checked my mix notes and pinned down which songs had drum samples.

There are 3 songs:

Falling - (dn beats)
I used a big suby kick sound to make the significant downbeats heavier.

Money - (crash, kick, snr)
We ended up using the pre pro version of this song for the final album. Everyone just liked the energy in that version. The drums were recorded in my little B room with no room mics. It needed a little help to make the drums sound like they were in an acoustic space. I also didn't capture a particularly attractive crash cymbal sound with the over heads, so I used a sample to help with that.

Who Are You - (kick sup)
I wasn't able to get the sort of deep low end I was hoping for out of the mics I had. I used a sample to help add that.

I definitely used gates a lot on these mixes. I use Aphex S612 gates and always key them. Hardware gates are somewhat flawed conceptually. They have to listen to the sound and then open. They try to do it as fast as possible but there is no escaping the fact that they will chop off a little of the beginning of what ever is being gated. Using the key input is the only way to avoid that. I create a duplicate track of the kick and snr and move them ahead anywhere from 1 - 3 ms for the key input. I can then also make adjustments to the key tracks to make sure the gate is responding correctly all the time.

This is obviously only really an issue when you are using hardware gates. I recently found a plug in gate that finally works properly. The Fab Filter Pro G is the s***. It has enough look ahead range to properly preserve the attacks the way I like. Obviously, with a plug in you can automate the parameters to make sure it is always responding properly through the different sections of the song. With that plug in I don't have to create a separate track for keying. Unfortunately, I can't use the plug in gate when I'm doing the whole print to tape and mix with a console thing.


EV
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12th July 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bwrecordings View Post
Would you talk about the drums and guitar sounds. Everything Is huge like beyond big but not harsh at all. How do you do that in the cymbals and gtrs. Where they seem just enormous but the 3-5k range isn't killing you but is def. There.

Any tips for the vocal and bass sounds?

You have made a great record. Your a huge influence my man.

Have a great day!

Rick Carson
On this one i wanted to try and have each guitar player have their own identifiable sound throughout the record. Ed's guitar generally was more of the high gain 100W head with a 4x12 cab type thing and John's was more of the AC30 combo type thing.

Ed used an SG, Gibson L6, Les Paul and occasionally a Gretsch Brian Setzer model guitar. We used a couple of different modified marshall heads, a soldano and sometimes an Orange OR120. Ed was the double coil high gain part of the equation. I mostly just used an SM57 on a Marshall reissue 1960 cab with Vintage 30s in it.

John mostly used a Telecaster, a Silvertone (Jupiter) and an Epiphone Casino. I have a particular AC30 cab that we used for almost all of his guitars. I recently replaced the speakers with the new JMI re-issues and they really sound great. We used the AC30 head, an Oldfield, Ampeg JET reissue and occasionally a magnatone. I used more condenser mics for his stuff to try and make more distinct from Ed's tone. It was mostly either Neumann M582s (front and back of the AC30 cab) or an AKG 451EB.

In both cases I was making use of the mic positioning robot I have setup at my place. At this point it would be very hard to get e to record guitar without the robot. I also always had stereo room mics up or both guitar players. I believe I stuck with the same pair of 451s I used as room mics or the drums.

EV
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12th July 2011
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Eric Valentine and New Taking Back Sunday self titled

Thank you so much Eric. This is such great information! I just have so many questions! Is there a particular frequency range you remember pulling out of the guitars or did they always sound that smooth.

Thanks for the great information on the gates!

Any info on vocals you'd like to share?
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12th July 2011
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pretty cool stuff EV!....thanks.
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12th July 2011
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Cool stuff, I haven't heard this yet but was very excited to hear the original members were back. I'll check this one out.
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12th July 2011
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Quote:
bwrecordings;6835268]How do you do that in the cymbals and gtrs. Where they seem just enormous but the 3-5k range isn't killing you but is def. There.
You are spot on with this observation. For some reason I am particularly sensitive to the 2K - 5K range. I just like it when I can turn up a mix really loud and not have it be abusive. That frequency range seems to be the area that makes things harsh. Maintaining the detail is an issue of moving energy from one part of the frequency range to another. Instead of just turning down the 2K-5K range, I always try to compliment it with an equal portion of higher stuff (7K and up). To my ears it just sounds like the top end is opening up and doesn't feel as restricted and harsh.

Sometimes I find the offending frequency is very specific with guitars, bass, cymbals and room mics. I used to use this crazy Orban 672A equalizer to do those kind of adjustments because i could get very narrow. I only had a few of them and typically there wasn't enough to go around. Now the UTA console EQ gets very narrow (a Q of 10) and even tighter in the notch mode so I don't have to reach for an outboard device to do it anymore. Sometimes cymbals and guitars will just have one of those obnoxious ringy overtones in the high mid range that just makes it very difficult to get it to blend with all the other stuff. I just tuck it in with a very narrow peak EQ. There is another move you can do where you cut a lot (7 or 8 db) at the offending frequency with a very narrow Q and then boost a little (2 or 3 db) at that same frequency with a very wide Q so the sound doesn't get to soft. That is the pitfall of pulling out a lot of 2K-5K. Your mix can start to sound too soft. In hindsight I would say some of my mixes over the years have fallen victim to that.

Quote:
Any tips for the vocal and bass sounds?
with vocals I would recommend to everyone to own an SM7. It is an affordable mic and I would say it wins the shoot out at least 50% of the time over mics that are at least 10x the price. I typically run it with the lowpass filter engaged. With Adam I added the presence peak, Johns voice didn't need that. I have a particular vintage blackface 1176 "D" that is my favorite vocal compressor for rock music. On this project I was typically also running a tube compressor in series with the 1176. Either a modified Gates Sta-Level or the custom Fairchild remake UTA is building. The vocal chain was SM7-Neve 1081-1176-tube compressor-pro tools. I typically don't EQ vocals when tracking.


With Bass I like to run 2 amps. One that is set a little cleaner and one that is dirtier. In this case it was an Ampeg SVT for the more basic solid bass sound and either an orange or an Oldfield guitar amp for the dirtier sound. In the verses I can lean more on the cleaner sound and then turn up the thicker dirtier sound in the choruses. It is important to get the 2 amp signals in phase or it can sound kind of dull when blended. When tracking in the computer I just use time adjuster to get them in phase. I typically like to mic the SVT cab pretty far back (about 25 to 30 inches) and the dirtier amp is mic'd closer. So I am typically delaying the dirtier amp to be in phase with the cleaner amp. When tracking I don't compress to aggressively with bass. I have found that too much of the wrong kind of compression can really ruin a bass sound. I use something smoother while tracking in this case the UTA Fairchild re-issue and then stomp on it a little harder in the mix with either an Alan Smart C2 or a GML 8900. In the mix I will EQ the bass mostly to make it as even as possible. i usually watch the meters to make sure there aren't any notes that are really sticking out. As much effort as I have put into my main monitors, It is impossible for them to be perfectly flat - especially in the low end. I have been tricked in he past trying to EQ the bass for something that is only an issue in my room. Just watch the meters!!

This project was really a guinea pig for the UTA EQ and the UTA Fairchild. I literally used them as much as possible throughout the project. I am just really excited about them and really want to put them through their paces. the sound of this record is probably mostly defined by those 2 boxes. I used the UTA EQ on everything and in this post you can see that I was using the Fairchild on Bass and Vocals. I also used the fairchild on drums a lot and on guitars at times.

EV
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12th July 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpalasini View Post
Eric,
My question is not so much about the sounds, but more about the process of making the album. In what order were the instruments tracked? Did anybody play along during basics, or just drums to a click/scratch track. Bass before guitars, or vice versa? How long would you say you guys spent per day/per week on the project, and how long total did it take?

Thanks again!

Drew Palasini
The project took About 3 months total in the studio doing the initial prepro and tracking and then about a month to mix everything. I would say about 4 months all together of actual working time in the studio. We did take a break in the middle while I exhibited UTA stuff at AES.

The first round of prepro was done in Seattle at a "live in" studio facility. We then later setup for more prepro at my place. I set them up in the B room at my studio. This time around everyone was really getting along great so it was easy to have them all playing together throughout the prepro/tracking process. i set aside 2 weeks for prepro. Each day we would work on a new song arrangement and review all the songs from all of the previous days. By the end of the 2 weeks I wanted them to be able to play the 11 songs of this record almost like a Live set. I wanted them to be that familiar with the parts when it came time to track them for real. No one would be trying to remember what they are supposed to play when they were trying to really perform the part. So every day of prepro would start with the review. Play all of the songs we already have arrangements for. Each day we would typically find more little tweaks to do to transitions or some of the guitar parts. Typically the lyrics are always a work in progress for Adam and John so they would have opportunities to try out some new lines on each of the songs on each of the reviews. We would spend only about half the day in the studio working together and then sometimes individual band members would have specific parts they needed to figure out or practice in the evenings. I always try to have the parts and ideas that are being played come from the band members. I will try to point out places in the arrangements where things could improve or be added and let the band members come up with the solutions. Their fans want to hear a Taking Back Sunday record... not an Eric Valentine record. I will only suggest a specific part or idea as a last resort or if I am asked to do that. by the end of prepro most all of the parts were well defined and the band was playing them with confidence.

For the tracking the whole band was setup playing together, although I was mostly only going for capturing the drums. The bass and guitars were all just DIs into amp simulators in the computer. It makes it so things go quickly and I don't have to deal with blaring guitar amps while focusing on drums. It also makes it easier to keep one of the bass or guitar performances if there is a magic moment. I have the DI available to run through whatever would be the final amp sound for that song.

during prepro the guys can sit down and be comfortable because they are long days and there can be a lot of waiting for one of the other guys to figure something out. When tracking i try to encourage them to stand up and play the way they do live. Visually it gives mark something to react to and the energy level of the performance always seems to step up a notch.

Mark did great. I think with the "review" style prepro he was able to nail each of the tracks with 2 or 3 passes. There were some sections that had more going (drum solo section of El Paso for instance) so we would do some extra passes of those kind of sections. Though typically the earlier takes were best.
I would comp together drum stuff and make stereo drum mixes on the console that get printed back in to pro tools. That way I can pull up a session for overdubbing and have a drum mix ready to go.

We stared with EDs ryth guitar first for overdubbing. We spent some time getting his basic heavy ryth guitar sound and then just jumped around to the different songs and tracked all of his ryth guitar parts which are sort of the foundation of most of the songs. We then did bass for most of the record. I do agree with the convention that it is easier to match the tuning of the bass to an existing guitar track that the other way around. So really it was EDs guitar tracks that were defining the tonal center for each song. We did most of John's guitars last. His parts are more textural melodic parts that sit on top of the other guitar/bass parts. It was important to be hearing the final rhythm guitar tone to be able to dial in an appropriate sound for Johns part that sat on top of it. There are times when you can feel a particular player is starting to get fatigued and lose focus. I try to let them take a break and bring someone else in for a bit so they can recharge their batteries and be excited, energized and focused when they are playing their parts. I also try to get the singers to sing in the evenings each day while we are still overdubbing the instruments. So overdub bass or guitar during the day until the dinner break and then do 2 or 3 hours of singing after dinner. I have made the mistake in the past of leaving all of the vocals for the end. It is impossible for a singer to sing for 10 or 12 hours straight every day. It destroys their voice and makes them feel like they are doing an inadequate job. It is just physically impossible to do. In this case Adam and John would trade off. We would have an Adam night and then a John night.

I like to work a 6 day week. typically about 12 hours a day. I start at about 10am and use the first 2 hours to do comping and organize my thoughts for what we will be doing that day. The band starts at noon doing overdubs and we typically would stop at 10pm. Towards the end of mixing I usually start to loose my mind and start working straight through.

EV
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12th July 2011
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Such a generous offering of your experiences with a great band!
Thanks

How do you keep your excitement, as the engineer, who doesn't get the emotional and physical breaks that the band gets through a 12+ hour day?
It surely can be exhausting trying to keep your mind straight focusing on so many things within a day. I assume experience and instinct plays a large role!

Thanks again for this, I am really enjoying reading this thread.
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12th July 2011
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Eric Valentine and New Taking Back Sunday self titled

Thanks so much Eric!

Did you use anything on the master buss, if so did you mix through it or add it to suit the song?
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12th July 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axlepaas View Post
Eric.

I know you've elaborated in the past about your drum recording technique. Is there anything about this particular record that u did different? Would also love to know a little more about your distressors on the drums! is it a parallel bus? Are the distressors giving you that unique attack that seems to be consistent on the TBS records?
I started out trying to do some more different stuff with the tracking of these drums, but I found most of my tried and true stuff ended up being the best in the end. As I have mentioned Mark plays very hard. I find that when drummers play hard the volume increases more with the cymbals than it does with the actual drums. The balance between the 2 becomes a bit of a problem. It forces a particular type of micing. Lots of close mics and baffling to try and keep the cymbals from washing out all of the punch and explosiveness of the drums. When I have tried to encourage drummers like mark to play the cymbals softer it just causes them to hesitate and the performances aren't as good. It is better for me to figure out how to accomodate his playing style instead of the other way around. So I recorded these using all the same tricks I have used in the past when I am trying to emphasize the punch and explosiveness of the drums.

The mixing approach was a little bit different this time around. I was really enjoying this Fairchild remake UTA is developing. It is the tube compressor I have been searching for on drums. Original Fairchilds are amazing at what they do. They have a smooth gushy quality that can be really amazing on bass and vocals. On drums, unless you are trying to recreate an old beatles recording, it is usually a little to smooth for modern rock stuff. This reissue uses 6BC8 varimu tubes instead of 6386s and has some new attack/release combinations that are really great on drums. It is the first tube compressor I have used that really sounds aggressive when its really stomping on the drum mix or even the individual kick and snr sounds. Ultimately, because it is a tube device it does have a more natural smooth quality to it. I find that the cymbals are preserved better than when using a VCA based compressor ala Distressor, dbx 160, SSL type thing. Anyway, I used this Fairchild thing a lot on the drum mixes.

El Paso is a good example of using it specifically on the kick and snare. The fairchild was on a blend of the kick mics and on a blend of a couple of snr sources. All the other mics (OH, room, toms) are then blended in and sent to a specific drum buss. That drum buss is mult'd and comes back on 3 pairs of stereo faders. The main pair has a pair of distressors on it. In this case the distressors were set pretty light because most of the compression was already coming form the Fairchild. The other 2 stereo pairs had a Compex and an EMI stereo limiter. Those compressors were set for absolute destruction and blended in very very little. I mostly use those to thicken the back ground ambience. They are usually about 20db quieter that the distressor pair.

The other approach that was used on this record on songs like "You Go Me" was to use the Fairchild on one of the drum stereo mix returns. The individual mics are compressed a bit more sparingly and then I would compress more aggressively with Fairchild on the overall drum mix. I also typically have a "no compression" drum buss as well. This is how I do my version of parallel compression. I think I kind of do it backwards. Instead of sending your main tracks to the main buss and blending in compressed signals, I send the drum mix to a compressed buss and then only send selected things to a non compressed buss. I am always starting off trying to keep it simple.. ala EQ some shit, send it to a compressor and be done. It usually doesn't end up working out that way but I think it is better to start simple and add complexity only when it is needed. The bussing on the UTA console makes this very easy. There are 3 independent stereo busses with their own level and pan controls. I can have lets say buss 1-2 be the buss that has the blend that is being compressed by the Fairchild or Distressors or whatever and then have buss 3-4 be the buss where I send little bits of signal to open up particular things that are getting squeezed a little too hard. Usually I'll send what ever is the significant low end component of the kick drum to the "no compression" buss or if the snr drum starts to get lost towards the end of the mix I'll send some of that to the no compression buss and then it pops right out. It is important to note that when mixing on an analog desk I feel it is better to have any parallel items follow the same path to avoid any phase cancellation in the high end. Basically if you send a blend that goes to a sub mix buss which is then sent to the main mix buss there will be additional roll off in the extended high end that can cause a phase shift closer to the audible range (this is typically done to protect the console from RF interference). If you take those same sources and then send them directly to the mix buss they can cancel high frequencies as they blend with those same sources arriving at the mix buss via a sub mix. We could have had the UTA console flat out to 200K if we wanted but for some reason it doesn't sound as good. The EMI console I used for a while had a very aggressive LP filter built in to the signal path for RF protection that made it impossible to do paralleling without identical paths. That thing started rolling off pretty quick after 20K and I gotta say the high end sounds absolutely beautiful on that console. The UTA console is higher than that because people expect to be able to combine things without thinking about identical signal paths. We came up with a 2 stage filter that gives the best all around results.

Sorry about that I'll try not to geek out about console stuff too much

Quote:
In a video on the TBS website, I saw Adam singing into an SM7 without the pop screen on it. Was this the vocal mic used for the whole record? any comp to "tape/pro tools"?
Adam and John did use an SM7 for all of the lead vocals, although we definitely used a pop screen when doing final vocal tracks. I also ran a separate room mic (an M49) for all of the lead vocals at the same time. I needed to be able to place the 2 singers in identifiable spaces at specific times in the song. Some of the choices of who would be featured where was still being figured out right up to the last second. This way I had the option of having either singer play a more supporting role by making them organically sound further away whenever I wanted in the mix.

Thank you for all the great questions and interest in the project. I hope the info is useful. I'll try to do some more tomorrow. I gotta get to work!

EV
#27
12th July 2011
Old 12th July 2011
  #27
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LinusWendel is offline
Thanks for the descriptive answers Eric! Love that you talk about your work in detail and share with us, it truly means a lot.

Did you use some cool pedals you want to shed a light on?
(Off topic: But the guitar tone in 1996 by The Wombats that comes in around 3.06 is truly amazing. I'd like to know everything about how you captured that tone from guitar to amp to micing.)

I'd like to ask a few non gear related questions that revolve around your role as a producer.

I've read in an interview with Fred that the goal with Louder Now was to make a 500.000 selling record. How much was that pressure from the label vs the band? How had this changed to this time around. I like both albums but Louder Now has a more instant mainstream appeal while the selftitled one took me a few more listens to win me over and it's now on repeat. I guess what I'm asking is: What was your goal and vision to bring out of the band contra the last time you worked with them. What was their goal? How has the band and chemistry changed?

"This modern glitch" with The Wombats was produced by you, Jacknife Lee, Rich Costly and Butch Walker. When working on an album with several producers how do you approach that task? Do you speak to the other producers? Or do you let the band do their thing? The album is really solid and I think it flows really well, given so many people has been involved. That's why I'm asking.

Thanks for answering our questions!
Keep up the amazing work!
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#28
12th July 2011
Old 12th July 2011
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trevvahhh is offline
hell yeah, thanks Eric. really cool of you
#29
13th July 2011
Old 13th July 2011
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Thank you for your time Eric!
#30
13th July 2011
Old 13th July 2011
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Love EVs work. Big tbs fan too. I'm taking copious notes!
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