Login / Register
 
Eric Valentine and New Taking Back Sunday self titled
Subscribe
#61
17th July 2011
Old 17th July 2011
  #61
Lives for gear
 
superburtm's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: LOS ANGELES
Posts: 4,115

superburtm is offline
Hello Eric,
Wouldn't foot pedals interact differently with an amp simulator than the eventual chosen AMP? It would seem that you would not have had an optimum environment to dial in the pedal. Or is the pedal thing going to a separate track than the straight up DI used for Reamping?

Thanks for sharing!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ev33 View Post
I am really enjoying this approach of capturing performances as DIs and then feeding the amps from Pro Tools with Reamps. The setup is Guitar -> DI -> Pro Tools -> Amp sim (while tracking basics) or Reamps (while doing final guitar overdubs) -> amps. I use the Avalon U5 DI Line Out directly into the computer. A while back a did the shoot out and the Avalon won hands down for me. I think it is mostly the absense of transformers and the 3Mohm input impedance that makes it so transparent. I use a custom Reamp that Larry Jasper built for me. I have 5 of them. On the TBS record I used digi Eleven for John and Ed to hear while they were tracking. They used their usual pedals before the DI input so they could have some tonal control at their feet. Typically i try to set up the amp sim so it will get distorted enough when they hit a pedal and clean up when they back off their volume either on the guitar or with a volume pedal. It is really just trying to emulate the response of their live setup. for players that use 2 amps live I will use 2 DIs and have 2 amp sims that they can switch between with an A/B switcher pedal. The cool thing is that if there really is an exceptional performance moment while tracking basics I have a much better chance of keeping it. I can simply send that DI signal to what ever the final amp setup ended up being and the tone will match the rest of the guitar they end up playing on the song.

When doing final overdubs, the first advantage to this setup is not wearing out the player while I'm getting the sound. Once we have settled on a particular guitar to use, I can have them play a section once and then go chill out while I go on the tone hunt auditioning amps, pedals, speakers, mics, EQ, compression etc. Sometimes that can take a while and expecting someone to play a part over and over when its not being kept can definitely cause a loss of enthusiasm. When they come back in after the tone tweaking, theoretically, the tone has improved and they are fresh and excited to play the part with the dialed in tone.

this is also the best way to split up the guitar signal for multiple amps. I actually mult the signal in Pro Tools by sending the DI track to multiple outputs and each output feeds its own Reamp. That makes it easy to isolate grounding between the amps, eliminate any unpredictable interaction or loading between the amps and use different pedals on different amps.

I like to run the guitars through an analog tape machine on the way into the computer. Once I have the DI performance all comp'd I simply run the final guitar pass into the computer through a tape machine on repro and nudge the track forward in Pro Tools so it is in time. Pretty much all of the guitars on this record went through a Studer J37 on the way into the computer.

I then also have the option of reamping a guitar part later on if it ends up not fitting into the puzzle quite right. A good example was the main riff sound on 'Falling'. i really struggled with that damn guitar sound. I had a multi amp sound I thought was great when we tracked it that ultimately wasn't quite right. I then reamp'd it later on in the overdub process and still wasn't happy with it when mixing, So I reamp'd it again when the song was being mixed and I think finally got it to sit right. I think someone mentioned on here that they liked that guitar sound... thank god! cause it was a pain in the ass! If I had to have Ed replay that part everytime I wanted to replace a sound that I screwed up, He would have justifiably given me a lot of shit for it.

EV
__________________
www.sanitysound.com
The Home of Analog Recording
#62
18th July 2011
Old 18th July 2011
  #62
Gear interested
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 21

the Weatherman is offline
This album sounds fantastic!

'Can't wait to read about how you approached creating ambience and depth.
#63
18th July 2011
Old 18th July 2011
  #63
...just a guy.
 
cianthreetimes's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Los Angeles, CA

cianthreetimes is offline
I have a bunch of photos from some of the tracking setups that I'll post when I get back to LA this week.

PS: Eric's making all of this up. He did the whole thing with drum samples and MIDI guitar patches.
__________________
cian riordan
engineer - producer
#64
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #64
Moderator
 
Blast9's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2003
Location: London, innit
Posts: 5,740

Blast9 is offline
I hope that is true! - welcome Cian!

PS Eric - many thanks for your thorough replies!
__________________
::
November 11th 2013 - New song/free download
http://andymitchellmusic.com/#/music
::
twitter > http://twitter.com/mitchellmusic - http://www.twitter.com/theyardbirds
#65
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #65
Gear maniac
 
ev33's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Los Angeles

ev33 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by fooman View Post
Thanks for the fantastic answer!

I'd like to add to the conversation by asking if you are ever taken out of the session psychologically by something seeming 'wrong' on your newly built console... or perhaps it didn't respond or sound the way you expected it to and it throws you off. You are personally tied to it, obviously!

I just would be so into a personally-built piece of gear (let alone the heart of my control room) that if something where to happen that seemed out-of-place it'd take my mind off of the work I was doing with the artist!

Thanks for your insights.
- Erik
Another good question. After 5 years of anticipation, it would have been very easy for the console to be distracting. I can't recall any moments when the console took me out of the moment, but I had a lot of time to get that out of my system leading up to the TBS record. The console was up and running earlier in 2010. There was no way I could jump straight into a full on album project. The console definitely would have been too distracting. I invited a band (The Noises 10) to come in and test drive the thing. They were an unsigned band and could use the opportunity to get recordings of some new material. They are friends, I have worked with them before and I explained to them they would be guinea pigs on this round. This song was the very first thing ever recorded and mixed on the console.

(This drum part is a little deceiving because it was recorded specifically to have a live drummer sound like a drum loop. The drum part is entirely a live performance and there are no samples on it… and yes there are 3 different hihats setup on the drum kit)

http://undertoneaudio.com/Audio/LID.mix.unmastered.wav

I felt relieved when it was done. If the first thing done on that console wasn't immediately satisfying for me in some way or another, it would have been difficult psychologically for sure. I had been mixing a lot in the box and or using various versions of hybrid mixing leading up to this and that style of mixing for me has always been uncomfortable. I am just used to using a console when I mix. This first recording sort of confirmed for me that I need to use a console to get the kind of size, separation and openness I feel like I had been able to get in the past without really thinking about it.

Even with a considerable warm up period I still had to be very deliberate about shifting gears when I started the TBS record. I literally had this conversation with myself… "I am done messing with this console for this project. Wherever it is at now will work great for this project and I am not going to f*** with it until after its done." It was one of the more Stewart Smalley-esque moments I've had in my life. I didn't want to be overly fixated on just the sound of the console while working on the TBS record. I feel there are 3 significant aspects to making records and I have always tried to prioritize them in this order:

1. Composition
2. Performance
3. Sound

It just seems that all the cool mic pres, EQs and compressors in the world can't make up for a shitty song or crappy playing. Where as, when the first 2 are right, it seems you can get away with whatever on the 3rd sometimes. Here's the catch though, and why I think we all enjoy spending our time on an online forum called Gearslutz, When all 3 elements (composition, performance AND SOUND) are there and are executed the best they can be, then you have one of those timeless amazing bench mark records ala Zep IV, Dark Side, Back In Black, Song In The key Of Life, Off The Wall etc. Not that I put any of the records I have worked on in that category. I just feel like that is type of experience we are all chasing. Weather I have ever achieved that or not, that is what I am shooting for every time I start a recording project.

EV
#66
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #66
Gear maniac
 
ev33's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Los Angeles

ev33 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seb RIOU View Post
Nice thread riding Eric
Your console looks gorgeous ! Any other patent waiting or alternative use for the porous metal ?

Hadn't heard the record yet, but I bet it rocks.

Best

Seb Riou
There is nothing else specific for the porous metal itself. Although, the patent does also cover using a porous non reflective surface for a work station type setup as well. Picture a Mid Atlantic type work station where all of the surfaces do not reflect any sound. for the couple of years when I didn't have a console setup I was building them for myself to use. Depending on the setup, it can really make a big difference with the sound of the near fields.

EV
#67
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #67
Moderator
 
Blast9's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2003
Location: London, innit
Posts: 5,740

Blast9 is offline
Eric - sorry to go OT for a sec - lovely overall "warmth" < (eek I said warmth) and smoothness to the The Noise 10 tune - was that straight to a DAW from your console?

And was that "thick" vocal sound achieved via the console mic pre? sounds like a mic with an un-hyped freq response
#68
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #68
Gear maniac
 
ev33's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Los Angeles

ev33 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by LinusWendel View Post
Also, you said that you changed the drums for this project as you had used more or less the same stuff for many years. What was your go to snares in those sessions? What snare did you use this time around?? Thank you very much. As you notice I'm like a kid in a candy story trying to take everything in.
The snares that have seen the most use over the years for me have been a Tama Bell Brass snare that I bought in the 90s. A red Ludwig vista light snare that I bought used a while back and there was this one Crappy 6" Pearl export chrome snare drum that had a great run. The pearl export was the snare used on Semi-Charmed life. I bought it used and it had a Power Stroke 3 head on it. It just sounded great. I literally never changed a thing on the drum for 6 years. I used it a bunch from 96' (when it was on the 3EB record) all the way into 2002 when it was used on the QOTSA record. Dave Grohl finally killed it on that record. He broke the head and it has never been the same since. It was an honorable way to go out it is kind of weird that the same snare with the same head on it was used on "Semi-Charmed Life" and "Go With The Flow".

The one thing that was unique and very memorable on the TBS record was a special drum kit we rented for the verses in "This Is All Now" and "Falling". We wanted to get a classic Clyde Stubblefield style sound for the verses of those songs. We rented a crazy looking Trixon drum kit for those parts. Cian and I are coordinating to find some pictures of this stuff.

I did still use snares from my collection for the TBS record. I have a pretty diverse collection of about 15 different snare drums and so I didn't feel like I needed to rent new stuff for that part of the kit. The one thing I did do this time is to get heads, snares, lug locs for all the snare drums so every snare in the collection was ready to go. Over the years some have been neglected and out of rotation. This time all the snares were tuned up and ready to go.

EV
#69
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #69
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,212

fooman is offline
hahaha yes! Someone needs to quote that part about not changing heads on the snare for 6 years and use it whenever someone says "you need to change heads every other take dammit!"
__________________

#70
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #70
Gear maniac
 
ev33's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Los Angeles

ev33 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blast9 View Post
Eric - sorry to go OT for a sec - lovely overall "warmth" < (eek I said warmth) and smoothness to the The Noise 10 tune - was that straight to a DAW from your console?

And was that "thick" vocal sound achieved via the console mic pre? sounds like a mic with an un-hyped freq response
Yes, actually one thing I forgot to mention about the Noises 10 song that was significant for me, was that there is no analog tape machine involved in that recording and I actually want to listen to it!! It really has been very difficult for me to make the transition to pure digital recording. This recording was at least a positive step in that direction.

The design of the UTA mic pres is only just now finished and fully tested. Unfortunately, it did not exist yet for that recording. The vocal was recorded with a custom tube mic pre (based on an old Pultec circuit). The mic was my usual fav (SM7) and a vintage 1176LN for compression. Of course Jason Scavone's voice makes it very easy to get a good vocal sound.

EV
#71
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #71
Gear maniac
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Sweden
Posts: 155

LinusWendel is offline
Again, thanks for the in depth answers to all our questions. I could go on and on and praise you for your openness and strive to push things forward. It is really inspiring hearing one of your heroes answering one of your own questions. I think i speak for all the gearslutz when I say we're really grateful that you take your time to do this!

btw, was the guitar sound(that plays the solo 3.06 into the song) in wombats - 1996 recorded by butch walker? if not could you please tell me what you used?
__________________
"Ideas are one thing and what happens is another" - John Cage
#72
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #72
Gear maniac
 
ev33's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Los Angeles

ev33 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by jordanvoth View Post
I just heard the single "Faith" the other day, incredible song and and incredible tones. Congrats on bringing TBS back to making really good music again. This is probably their best stuff since "Tell All Your Friends". My question, which snare was used for "Faith" and is there any sampling happening on that track?
We recorded the drums on that song twice. The second recording is what we used on the final. I am pretty sure the snare we used was a standard 4.5" depth ludwig with a hand hammered brass shell. I am not sure what the exact name of that model snare is though. I'll follow up if I can find more info.

There are no samples used on the song Faith. There is a post earlier in this thread that lists the few places where samples were used.

Eric Valentine and New Taking Back Sunday self titled



EV
#73
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #73
Moderator
 
Blast9's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2003
Location: London, innit
Posts: 5,740

Blast9 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by ev33 View Post
Yes, actually one thing I forgot to mention about the Noises 10 song that was significant for me, was that there is no analog tape machine involved in that recording and I actually want to listen to it!! It really has been very difficult for me to make the transition to pure digital recording. This recording was at least a positive step in that direction.

The design of the UTA mic pres is only just now finished and fully tested. Unfortunately, it did not exist yet for that recording. The vocal was recorded with a custom tube mic pre (based on an old Pultec circuit). The mic was my usual fav (SM7) and a vintage 1176LN for compression. Of course Jason Scavone's voice makes it very easy to get a good vocal sound.

EV
Congrats Eric - mission accomplished! Thanks for the info.
#74
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #74
Gear maniac
 
axlepaas's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 281

axlepaas is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by ev33 View Post
it is kind of weird that the same snare with the same head on it was used on "Semi-Charmed Life" and "Go With The Flow".


EV
this is blowing my mind right now. that is SOOO COOL!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ev33 View Post
I think someone mentioned on here that they liked that guitar sound... thank god! cause it was a pain in the ass!

EV
That was me asking about the tone in "FALLING". LOVED that tone. Really stuck out to me, was really "ripping" sounding....like the amp was right on the edge ...was it a smaller combo? Also, i'm wondering if i understand this right. Did u say that u run the guitar into the Avalon U5 Di, and then right into your converters? No mic pre first? Would love to be able to get the cleanest possible DI sound without any color....



Thanks again for answering all these questions. really appreciate it!

kp
#75
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #75
Lives for gear
 
jeremyglover's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: berlin
Posts: 1,509
My Recordings/Credits

jeremyglover is offline
eric, it really is amazing that you take your time to share all of your techniques and experiences with us.

thank you.

jeremy
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by CorkyTart View Post
Cool. More fights about music equipment.
#76
19th July 2011
Old 19th July 2011
  #76
Gear maniac
 
ev33's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Los Angeles

ev33 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by axlepaas View Post
Also, i'm wondering if i understand this right. Did u say that u run the guitar into the Avalon U5 Di, and then right into your converters? No mic pre first? Would love to be able to get the cleanest possible DI sound without any color....



Thanks again for answering all these questions. really appreciate it!

kp
Yes, the Avalon U5 is one of very few DIs that is transformerless and has a +4 line level out. I plug that +4 line out signal directly to the input of the Digi 192. When trying to capture a DI signal for the purpose of reamping, it seems optimizing for transparency has gotten the best results. Using A DI that has a transformer in it, then going to a mic pre that has a couple of transformers in it will introduce a lot of coloration. In my experience, the coloration takes you further away from the sound of plugging the instrument directly into the amp. Although, the coloration can be great when you are actually using the DI signal itself.

EV
#77
20th July 2011
Old 20th July 2011
  #77
Gear Head
 
Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 48

and you know is offline
I've got no idea who you are, I've only heard of a couple of bands that you have worked with and I think I've picked up more knowledge and usable tips in this thread than I have anywhere else over the last few years so thank you.
I'm a lurker and somebody who does music as a hobby in a small room at the back of my house when I get time away from work, kids and she who must be obeyed.
Thank you.
#78
20th July 2011
Old 20th July 2011
  #78
Gear interested
 
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 20

suburbansoul is online now
Hi Eric,

I own an Ampgeg II J-12 T amp. I remembering you mentioning that use this combo amp as a head feeding a cabinet. How'd ya do it? There are no outputs on mine? Did you have yours modded? Thanks!
#79
20th July 2011
Old 20th July 2011
  #79
Gear maniac
 
ev33's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Los Angeles

ev33 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by suburbansoul View Post
Hi Eric,

I own an Ampgeg II J-12 T amp. I remembering you mentioning that use this combo amp as a head feeding a cabinet. How'd ya do it? There are no outputs on mine? Did you have yours modded? Thanks!
I moded mine so it would be possible to hook up an external speaker. I cut the speaker wire going to the 12" speaker in the cabinet. I put a female 1/4" connector on the wires coming from the amp and a male 1/4" connector on the wires leading to the speaker. This way you can still use the internal speaker if you want. The amp is permanently setup up to drive 8 ohms. It is best to plug it into an 8 ohm cabinet. 16 ohms is also fine, but it will be a little quieter. If you plug the amp into 4 ohms there is a small chance that you can damage the amp.

Best,

EV
#80
22nd July 2011
Old 22nd July 2011
  #80
Lives for gear
 
DaveUK's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: newcastle upon tyne
Posts: 1,132
My Recordings/Credits

DaveUK is offline
Bless you Mr Eric ! All good

Sent from my X10i using Gearslutz.com App
#81
22nd July 2011
Old 22nd July 2011
  #81
Lives for gear
 
heyman's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2005
Location: Providence, RI
Posts: 3,263

heyman is offline
Thank you Eric..!
#82
22nd July 2011
Old 22nd July 2011
  #82
Lives for gear
 
AstralPStudios's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Temple, TX
Posts: 1,629
My Recordings/Credits

Send a message via Skype™ to AstralPStudios
AstralPStudios is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by ev33 View Post
The project took About 3 months total in the studio doing the initial prepro and tracking and then about a month to mix everything. I would say about 4 months all together of actual working time in the studio. We did take a break in the middle while I exhibited UTA stuff at AES.

The first round of prepro was done in Seattle at a "live in" studio facility. We then later setup for more prepro at my place. I set them up in the B room at my studio. This time around everyone was really getting along great so it was easy to have them all playing together throughout the prepro/tracking process. i set aside 2 weeks for prepro. Each day we would work on a new song arrangement and review all the songs from all of the previous days. By the end of the 2 weeks I wanted them to be able to play the 11 songs of this record almost like a Live set. I wanted them to be that familiar with the parts when it came time to track them for real. No one would be trying to remember what they are supposed to play when they were trying to really perform the part. So every day of prepro would start with the review. Play all of the songs we already have arrangements for. Each day we would typically find more little tweaks to do to transitions or some of the guitar parts. Typically the lyrics are always a work in progress for Adam and John so they would have opportunities to try out some new lines on each of the songs on each of the reviews. We would spend only about half the day in the studio working together and then sometimes individual band members would have specific parts they needed to figure out or practice in the evenings. I always try to have the parts and ideas that are being played come from the band members. I will try to point out places in the arrangements where things could improve or be added and let the band members come up with the solutions. Their fans want to hear a Taking Back Sunday record... not an Eric Valentine record. I will only suggest a specific part or idea as a last resort or if I am asked to do that. by the end of prepro most all of the parts were well defined and the band was playing them with confidence.

For the tracking the whole band was setup playing together, although I was mostly only going for capturing the drums. The bass and guitars were all just DIs into amp simulators in the computer. It makes it so things go quickly and I don't have to deal with blaring guitar amps while focusing on drums. It also makes it easier to keep one of the bass or guitar performances if there is a magic moment. I have the DI available to run through whatever would be the final amp sound for that song.

during prepro the guys can sit down and be comfortable because they are long days and there can be a lot of waiting for one of the other guys to figure something out. When tracking i try to encourage them to stand up and play the way they do live. Visually it gives mark something to react to and the energy level of the performance always seems to step up a notch.

Mark did great. I think with the "review" style prepro he was able to nail each of the tracks with 2 or 3 passes. There were some sections that had more going (drum solo section of El Paso for instance) so we would do some extra passes of those kind of sections. Though typically the earlier takes were best.
I would comp together drum stuff and make stereo drum mixes on the console that get printed back in to pro tools. That way I can pull up a session for overdubbing and have a drum mix ready to go.

We stared with EDs ryth guitar first for overdubbing. We spent some time getting his basic heavy ryth guitar sound and then just jumped around to the different songs and tracked all of his ryth guitar parts which are sort of the foundation of most of the songs. We then did bass for most of the record. I do agree with the convention that it is easier to match the tuning of the bass to an existing guitar track that the other way around. So really it was EDs guitar tracks that were defining the tonal center for each song. We did most of John's guitars last. His parts are more textural melodic parts that sit on top of the other guitar/bass parts. It was important to be hearing the final rhythm guitar tone to be able to dial in an appropriate sound for Johns part that sat on top of it. There are times when you can feel a particular player is starting to get fatigued and lose focus. I try to let them take a break and bring someone else in for a bit so they can recharge their batteries and be excited, energized and focused when they are playing their parts. I also try to get the singers to sing in the evenings each day while we are still overdubbing the instruments. So overdub bass or guitar during the day until the dinner break and then do 2 or 3 hours of singing after dinner. I have made the mistake in the past of leaving all of the vocals for the end. It is impossible for a singer to sing for 10 or 12 hours straight every day. It destroys their voice and makes them feel like they are doing an inadequate job. It is just physically impossible to do. In this case Adam and John would trade off. We would have an Adam night and then a John night.

I like to work a 6 day week. typically about 12 hours a day. I start at about 10am and use the first 2 hours to do comping and organize my thoughts for what we will be doing that day. The band starts at noon doing overdubs and we typically would stop at 10pm. Towards the end of mixing I usually start to loose my mind and start working straight through.

EV
Just had to say, it's pretty shocking how similar you and I work. That's pretty nifty.

Tracking everyone live and putting guitars in DIs into the amp sims is exactly what I do. It DOES make stuff go SO much faster.

Honestly tracking live for drums just makes sense to me, the drummer gets to feed off of everyone else and it helps he/she to stay in time a lot better (at least in my experience)

Prepro is such an important part of production yet so many skip it. It sets the tone for everything from tracking all the way down to mastering and not just choosing who's going to be doing what.

We even start work at the same time. 10am HAHA!

It's cool when you find people with the same thoughts/goals/techniques as yourself. Everyone does things differently yet sometimes you meet your twin!
__________________
Chart Topping Sound, Strategic Guidance -- Propel Your Music.

Label quality mix engineer/A&R | Like APS on FB | APS on Twitter | Audioblog
#83
22nd July 2011
Old 22nd July 2011
  #83
Gear maniac
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Sweden
Posts: 155

LinusWendel is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by ev33 View Post
On this one i wanted to try and have each guitar player have their own identifiable sound throughout the record. Ed's guitar generally was more of the high gain 100W head with a 4x12 cab type thing and John's was more of the AC30 combo type thing.

Ed used an SG, Gibson L6, Les Paul and occasionally a Gretsch Brian Setzer model guitar. We used a couple of different modified marshall heads, a soldano and sometimes an Orange OR120. Ed was the double coil high gain part of the equation. I mostly just used an SM57 on a Marshall reissue 1960 cab with Vintage 30s in it.

John mostly used a Telecaster, a Silvertone (Jupiter) and an Epiphone Casino. I have a particular AC30 cab that we used for almost all of his guitars. I recently replaced the speakers with the new JMI re-issues and they really sound great. We used the AC30 head, an Oldfield, Ampeg JET reissue and occasionally a magnatone. I used more condenser mics for his stuff to try and make more distinct from Ed's tone. It was mostly either Neumann M582s (front and back of the AC30 cab) or an AKG 451EB.

In both cases I was making use of the mic positioning robot I have setup at my place. At this point it would be very hard to get e to record guitar without the robot. I also always had stereo room mics up or both guitar players. I believe I stuck with the same pair of 451s I used as room mics or the drums.

EV
The guitar sounds on this record is huge I have a few more questions about that. Where do you often place your mics, a bit off axis since your guitar tones are never harsh? I've never heard seen anyone micing an amp with a 451, was that with the ck1 capsule? Ultimate guitar recently did an interview with tbs, and they talk very highly of you, adam even says he want you to do all of their records, so congrats on doing a great job getting the right atmosphere and vibe in the studio. John says you used tons of pedals on the record, which pedals did you often use? was the rythmsounds(ed) mostly straight to the amp and johns lead stuff pedals to amp?

Here's the interview if you'd like to read it yourself =)
Taking Back Sunday's Guitarist: 'I Went To UG To See Tabs For TBS Songs' | Interviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com
#84
22nd July 2011
Old 22nd July 2011
  #84
Lives for gear
 
jeremyglover's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: berlin
Posts: 1,509
My Recordings/Credits

jeremyglover is offline
the 451's were used out in the room. still set up from the drums i'd imagine.

jeremy
#85
22nd July 2011
Old 22nd July 2011
  #85
Lives for gear
 
Rick Carson's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: Omaha Nebraska
Posts: 1,395

Rick Carson is offline
Yeah can we talk a little more about the pedal use before the amp sim. I get why, but I feel like I could make mistakes on the pedals an not get them perfect. Care to indulge which tone setting your u5 was on for guitars and bass?
__________________
Rick Carson

Producer, Mix Engineer.
Make Believe Studios
www.makebelievestudio.com
#86
22nd July 2011
Old 22nd July 2011
  #86
Lives for gear
 
jeremyglover's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: berlin
Posts: 1,509
My Recordings/Credits

jeremyglover is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by cianthreetimes View Post
I have a bunch of photos from some of the tracking setups that I'll post when I get back to LA this week.
please do!
#87
22nd July 2011
Old 22nd July 2011
  #87
Gear maniac
 
mindbend's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Location: Urbana, Illinois
Posts: 194

mindbend is offline
I've been a GS member for a long time, but very frequently post. It is threads like this that make Gearslutz an unbelievably valuable place to visit. Eric Valentine you rock! I had never heard of The Wombats until today, and decided to check out the song 1996, especially since Butch Walker had some input on it. That song rocks. The Noises 10 song you posted on here is killer too, and I have listened to it a few times in a row. You recorded/mixed the first Third Eye Blind cd, and I consider that to be the best sounding and best produced album of all time. Awesome Awesome work. Although TBS' music isn't typically my style, I may have to go out and pick up the cd just to listen to how it is put together. The average person has no idea how much producers and engineers affect the overall sound of an album. It is guys like you that bring out the best in bands, which is what makes their records memorable. Thank you very very much!
#88
23rd July 2011
Old 23rd July 2011
  #88
...just a guy.
 
cianthreetimes's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Los Angeles, CA

cianthreetimes is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremyglover View Post
please do!
hey there, hang tight. we're coordinating which photos to post. stay tuned...
#89
23rd July 2011
Old 23rd July 2011
  #89
Lives for gear
 
Rick Carson's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: Omaha Nebraska
Posts: 1,395

Rick Carson is offline
!
#90
24th July 2011
Old 24th July 2011
  #90
Gear maniac
 
axlepaas's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 281

axlepaas is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by cianthreetimes View Post
hey there, hang tight. we're coordinating which photos to post. stay tuned...
Thanks soo much Cian! This thread has been ridiculously informative. Can't thank u guys enough for taking time to answer our questions!

kp
Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook  Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter  Submit Thread to LinkedIn LinkedIn  Submit Thread to Google+ Google+ 
 
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
dusty cooper / So much gear, so little time!
22
RARStudios / Work In Progress / Advice Requested / Show & Tell / Artist Showcase / Mix-Offs
2
luctellier / Work In Progress / Advice Requested / Show & Tell / Artist Showcase / Mix-Offs
27
Tandem5 / So much gear, so little time!
24
Gregg Sartiano / So much gear, so little time!
2

Forum Jump

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.