Record Plant Memories.
herecomesyourman
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24th April 2012
Old 24th April 2012
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Record Plant Memories.

Hi Jay, thank you so much for doing this.

I used to work for Shelly Yakus back in 2008, and he would always tell me great stories about working at Record Plant and how much he continually learned from everyone there when we would socialize outside of work.

Roy Cicala was one person in particular he would always talk about fondly in regards to admiring techniques and innovation. (I remember he once told me Mr. Cicala made early shock mounts DIY before anyone had every really done that for example and to Shelly's mind, it was one of those "The world is not flat" kind of moments for him)

I was just wondering if there were any memories that come to mind in particular that stand out in regard to learning techniques that really helped elevate your craft from when you worked there?

Did anyone in particular influence your mixing and engineering techniques when you worked there? And what records really turned you on that you found yourself studying to find your own fingerprint as a mix engineer? I personally feel you have a sound that's all your own, but everyone has their heroes and mentors right? I always kind of look at engineering as a situation where "it takes a village to raise a child" so to speak.

I'm a huge fan, and I hope you and yours are having a good one!

Sincerely,

- Cary Miller.
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24th April 2012
Old 24th April 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herecomesyourman View Post
Hi Jay, thank you so much for doing this.

I used to work for Shelly Yakus back in 2008, and he would always tell me great stories about working at Record Plant and how much he continually learned from everyone there when we would socialize outside of work.

Roy Cicala was one person in particular he would always talk about fondly in regards to admiring techniques and innovation. (I remember he once told me Mr. Cicala made early shock mounts DIY before anyone had every really done that for example and to Shelly's mind, it was one of those "The world is not flat" kind of moments for him)

I was just wondering if there were any memories that come to mind in particular that stand out in regard to learning techniques that really helped elevate your craft from when you worked there?

Did anyone in particular influence your mixing and engineering techniques when you worked there? And what records really turned you on that you found yourself studying to find your own fingerprint as a mix engineer? I personally feel you have a sound that's all your own, but everyone has their heroes and mentors right? I always kind of look at engineering as a situation where "it takes a village to raise a child" so to speak.

I'm a huge fan, and I hope you and yours are having a good one!

Sincerely,

- Cary Miller.
Hi Cary,

I have many fond memories of Record Plant. It was a special, family kind of atmosphere. If I were to pick a favorite engineer of mine, it wold be Roy Cicala. He's certainly the most inventive one I know.
As far as learning some skills at RP (and A&R), I'd have to say I learned a lot from the musician friends I had, that I would bring in the studio (on off hours) and just experiment. They would want to record some songs they wrote or arranged, and I wanted to practice my engineering. I was fortunate to have, as friends, the best studio players in town. The Brecker Brothers, Mike Mainieri, Steve Gadd, Tony Levin, to name just a few. Listening to their feedback was invaluable to me, both at Record Plant and A & R Studios (I was at A&R before RP)

The 2 records that stood out to me were Sgt. Peppers' and Bridge Over Troubled Water.
herecomesyourman
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25th April 2012
Old 25th April 2012
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Originally Posted by Jay Messina View Post
Hi Cary,

I have many fond memories of Record Plant. It was a special, family kind of atmosphere. If I were to pick a favorite engineer of mine, it wold be Roy Cicala. He's certainly the most inventive one I know.
As far as learning some skills at RP (and A&R), I'd have to say I learned a lot from the musician friends I had, that I would bring in the studio (on off hours) and just experiment. They would want to record some songs they wrote or arranged, and I wanted to practice my engineering. I was fortunate to have, as friends, the best studio players in town. The Brecker Brothers, Mike Mainieri, Steve Gadd, Tony Levin, to name just a few. Listening to their feedback was invaluable to me, both at Record Plant and A & R Studios (I was at A&R before RP)

The 2 records that stood out to me were Sgt. Peppers' and Bridge Over Troubled Water.

Seriously brought a grin to my face reading about you, Tony Levin and Steve Gadd in particular!

Thanks a lot for the reply Jay. Trying to make recordings feel special in this day an age is a bit taxing at times, but when I read or talk with people from your generation in particular I always feel inspired and a bit renewed.

- Cary.
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