Login / Register
 
Surround mixing explained to a producer?
New Reply
Subscribe
alexw7070
Thread Starter
#1
4th February 2013
Old 4th February 2013
  #1
Gear interested
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 3

Thread Starter
alexw7070 is offline
Surround mixing explained to a producer?

Hi,

This is my first post in this forum, so I apologize for my lack of knowledge on the subject. I am a producer and do mixing and mastering for local musicians. I have years of experience in recording and music mixing and mastering. However, I was asked whether I can do the sound for a ten minute short film, and am debating whether I can do this. I feel confident in my ability to do a 2.1 mix and have no issues with the foley, sound design, processing, and other recording and editing aspects.

I have no experience in mixing in 5.1 however and do not understand the process that it takes to create a surround sound mix. I do have the gear necessary though. I am wondering, do the mixing artists usually create a stereo mix as well as a surround mix? Or do they usually create a surround mix only and then the sources playing the film automatically playback in the required format. I know this is basic knowledge so excuse my simple questions. Also, how does the printmastering process work? I am so confused about all the different formats and standards such as Dolby Digital etc. Would I do a 5.1 mixdown and then send the audio to a studio that does printmastering? Or is the printmastering something I could do myself with the proper plugins.

Any information regarding 5.1 surround and the process of printmastering explained to the eyes of a producer would be greatly appreciated.
#2
4th February 2013
Old 4th February 2013
  #2
Gear Guru
 
charles maynes's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2004
Location: out in the dirt.
Posts: 15,889

charles maynes is offline
Hi Alex-

a short, unless already set for real theatrical release, (not just festivals and local screenings) will not benefit that much from a 5.1 usually- the added expense is not crazy, but it is certainly added expense. If you are inexperienced with theatrical mixing- (which would be 5.1- as it has been the usual standard for the last 15 years or so) it would be most efficient to hire an experienced re-recording mixer to manage the process, and sit as the second mixer if you prefer. But it is something that should be done properly if you choose that route....
__________________
Charles Maynes credits
Charles' webpage



“Judging others makes us blind, whereas love is illuminating. By judging others we blind ourselves to our own evil and to the grace which others are just as entitled to as we are.”
? Dietrich Bonhoeffer, The Cost of Discipleship
Quote
1
#3
4th February 2013
Old 4th February 2013
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Henchman's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: LA, USA
Posts: 8,583
My Recordings/Credits

Henchman is offline
Alex, as someone who comes from a music engineering and production background myself, I can guarantee you mixing post and music are two completely different things.

If you want it done right.


Think about this.

If you saw someone post the following question, what would your response be:

"Hi, I have been recording ADR and mixing film and TV for years.
A friend of mine has asked me to record, engineer,produce and mix his band.
I've never doen any of the above, but I have all the gear.

What advice can you give me."
Quote
1
#4
4th February 2013
Old 4th February 2013
  #4
Matt R. Sherman
 
Smallbudgetguru's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Montreal, Canada
Posts: 600

Smallbudgetguru is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexw7070 View Post
Any information regarding 5.1 surround and the process of printmastering explained to the eyes of a producer would be greatly appreciated.
Find an internship, learn to edit sound for film well, prove yourself, move up to a mix assistant position, learn from mixers for some years. It's another world gotta start from the bottom. Good to have some experience in studio like you have so you should know how to keep quiet and learn in that environment at least.
__________________
Matt R. Sherman - Gift Of Sound
http://www.giftofsound.ca
http://www.imdb.me/mattrsherman
alexw7070
Thread Starter
#5
4th February 2013
Old 4th February 2013
  #5
Gear interested
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 3

Thread Starter
alexw7070 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henchman View Post
Alex, as someone who comes from a music engineering and production background myself, I can guarantee you mixing post and music are two completely different things.

If you want it done right.


Think about this.

If you saw someone post the following question, what would your response be:

"Hi, I have been recording ADR and mixing film and TV for years.
A friend of mine has asked me to record, engineer,produce and mix his band.
I've never doen any of the above, but I have all the gear.

What advice can you give me."
The reason I mentioned that is because I thought it is important to know that I understand all the hardware and technology that is necessary and that I have a fine tuned ear. I would have no problem doing a stereo mix for this film. I have edited stereo sound for small videos before and have been on the production processes of other shorts. I cannot imagine that adding two rear speakers and a center suddenly makes it impossible for me to even bother. But maybe I am wrong. I dont know because I haven't tried yet. I have plenty of time to learn though which is why I am asking.

And yes I believe that somebody who has the ability to mix television film has a fine tuned ear that would make it a much easier transition into mixing music. They are not starting from scratch, and it would be using the same tools and knowledge about sound in a different manner.

However, would it even be necessary for this short to have a 5.1 mix? It will be entered into a few festivals in sight,. If so, would it be inefficient if I did the sound design and editing and a stereo mix and then hired a re-recording house to make a 5.1 mix? How does this process usually work. Does the re-recording artist usually create two mixes. And can somebody explain the printmastering process to me. How are the different formats chosen?
#6
4th February 2013
Old 4th February 2013
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Pedantic Sound's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: NYC

Pedantic Sound is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexw7070 View Post
And yes I believe that somebody who has the ability to mix television film has a fine tuned ear that would make it a much easier transition into mixing music. They are not starting from scratch, and it would be using the same tools and knowledge about sound in a different manner.
Sure, I'd be better at recording/mixing music than say a garbage man, but it's still very different from audio post. With a few exceptions, all of our plugins have different uses, and workflows aren't the same at all.

Not to say don't go for it, but I wouldn't expect a step by step tutorial on the entirety of the post sound process here.

Check out this thread, it will answer a lot of your questions:
Geo's sound post corner
__________________
Jesse Flaitz - Production sound and audio post. Greater NYC area.
http://pedanticsound.net
“A cable is a source of potential trouble connecting two other sources of potential trouble.”
alexw7070
Thread Starter
#7
4th February 2013
Old 4th February 2013
  #7
Gear interested
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 3

Thread Starter
alexw7070 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedantic Sound View Post
Sure, I'd be better at recording/mixing music than say a garbage man, but it's still very different from audio post. With a few exceptions, all of our plugins have different uses, and workflows aren't the same at all.

Not to say don't go for it, but I wouldn't expect a step by step tutorial on the entirety of the post sound process here.

Check out this thread, it will answer a lot of your questions:
Geo's sound post corner
Appreciate the link. It does have lots of quality info that Ill be looking through.

But I was not looking for any step by step on everything in post. I've done everything involved in post for smaller videos, but since they didn't involve 5.1 or theatrical releases, really was trying to get info on what the standard format is for shorts and whether 2 mixes are necessary.
#8
4th February 2013
Old 4th February 2013
  #8
Gear Head
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 73

GregorioM is offline
Because you know so little about audio post you are asking what seems to you to be a simple question and are expecting a simple answer. In reality your question is not simple and the answer is even less simple.

There is no standard format for shorts because different film festivals have different standards and usually require a submission copy and then an exhibition copy in a different format.

Theatrical 5.1 is an utterly different proposition from a stereo TV mix, let alone a stereo music mix. You don't even seem to know how many additional speakers are required, let alone how to actually create a mix which works in a vastly different acoustic to your music production studio on a vastly different sound system!

You have been given good advice already in this thread, of course it's up to you if you want to ignore it and instead learn the hard way.

G
#9
5th February 2013
Old 5th February 2013
  #9
Lives for gear
 
soundboy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 896

soundboy is offline
Experiment, have fun, make mistakes. That's how you learn. The 2 channel mix is often derived from the 5.1. Sometimes it's done with hardware, sometimes with software, sometimes it's done with routing in the mix set up. As far as print mastering is concerned, that is done by a Dolby technician on a Dolby approved mix stage.
A surround mix is done by placing the sounds in your mix in the space you are creating. Just like a stereo mix, only now instead of 2 channels you have six. Place the elements so they sound appropriate to your ears. Listen to other people's mixes on similar movies.
__________________
Charles Dayton, CAS MPSE
Twisted Avocado Post Audio
Partial credits:
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0206743/
#10
5th February 2013
Old 5th February 2013
  #10
Lives for gear
 
soundboy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 896

soundboy is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexw7070 View Post
The reason I mentioned that is because I thought it is important to know that I understand all the hardware and technology that is necessary and that I have a fine tuned ear. I would have no problem doing a stereo mix for this film. I have edited stereo sound for small videos before and have been on the production processes of other shorts. I cannot imagine that adding two rear speakers and a center suddenly makes it impossible for me to even bother. But maybe I am wrong. I dont know because I haven't tried yet. I have plenty of time to learn though which is why I am asking.

And yes I believe that somebody who has the ability to mix television film has a fine tuned ear that would make it a much easier transition into mixing music. They are not starting from scratch, and it would be using the same tools and knowledge about sound in a different manner.

However, would it even be necessary for this short to have a 5.1 mix? It will be entered into a few festivals in sight,. If so, would it be inefficient if I did the sound design and editing and a stereo mix and then hired a re-recording house to make a 5.1 mix? How does this process usually work. Does the re-recording artist usually create two mixes. And can somebody explain the printmastering process to me. How are the different formats chosen?
I'll add this. Mixing music is to mixing film, like framing houses is to furniture building. They both use hammers and saws, they are two very different disciplines, with different terminology. And where a song may have 50 tracks, a film commonly has over 200. Once you get into the mix, you will have more specific questions.
#11
5th February 2013
Old 5th February 2013
  #11
Lives for gear
 
Mundox's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 545

Mundox is offline
Alex, assuming you have sound edit/design sorted, and know what you need to do creatively to make a film sound like a film, there are few technical considerations for creating a surround track.
5.1 is : Left, Center, Right, Left Surround, Right Surround, and Lfe (sub)
If I had to make a gross generalisation: most if not all dialog and most foley and fx comes through the center channel. You pan them if the scene calls for it.
I.e feet coming off screen from the left centre and into frame etc.
Music is usually Left / Right, some center and music ambience in the back. You can look into getting an upmixing plugin like Iosono for spreading music.
Don't be too eager to put stuff in the surrounds, only subtle atmos and incidentals. I personally like putting birds flying off here and there and other moving things if I need to make the atmos more vibrant. But for your first surround mix, I would concentrate on the LCR to be honest.

Of course none of this will work properly if your room isn't calibrated properly. There are some invaluable information in the sticky threads on this forum. Read them and ask questions on those threads.

For turning surround into stereo there are two ways. One is to create an LtRt with a plugin. This is so the mix can be decoded back to surround if the playback supports LtRt decoding. Other is to simply downmixing to be LoRo --which simply means stereo. To do this Pro Tools has a plugin called down mixer that makes it simple. But you can do this by using your own routing.

Over at avid site there are some webinars you should watch. They are great to get some insight for beginners.

Give it a shot, at the end of the day it's not surgery and no one will die. (hopefully)
__________________
Vedat



Automatic volume riding for Pro Tools®
Wave Rider RTAS and AAX for Win and Mac.
64 & 32 bits

Our Facebook Page
http://www.automaticmixing.com

Catchin' SYNC app now @ up to 120fps recording!!
#12
8th February 2013
Old 8th February 2013
  #12
Gear maniac
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Nyack, NY

Tom Fleischman is offline
Short answer:

Rent a Dolby Certified mixing stage.

Keep the dialogue in the center channel unless there is a very good, story-driven reason to pan.

Keep the music in stereo and bleed it to the surround using plugins, panning, and/or reverb.

Don't put any dialogue or percussive sound effects in the surrounds unless there is a very good, story-driven reason to do so.

Specific sound effects like doors and footsteps that happen center screen should be panned center.

LFE to taste.

Create separate stems for dialogue, music, sound effects, ambience, and foley. You'll thank yourself later.
#13
11th February 2013
Old 11th February 2013
  #13
Gear addict
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 491

nathand is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Fleischman View Post
Keep the music in stereo and bleed it to the surround using plugins, panning, and/or reverb.
My thoughts on spreading out the music into the surrounds using Reverb/Delay style processing:

Be careful if your 5.1 mix will eventually be Folded-Down. Unless your intention was to add Reverb to the music, give it a dreamy feel, place it spatially, etc. you are inadvertently adding it everywhere music plays. Was that what you had in mind when you first mixed the scene in 5.1 - to make the music "wet"? Doubt it. At least that's not what typically comes to my mind when mixing in music. Of course use Reverb to get out of cues or in the ways mentioned above but I don't have a Reverb plug-in on my Music bus in order to ALWAYS apply a little bit of Reverb to my Music Stem.

What do you think Tom - BS?
__________________
Nathan Dubin
Margarita Mix de Santa Monica
www.lastudios.com
#14
11th February 2013
Old 11th February 2013
  #14
Gear maniac
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Nyack, NY

Tom Fleischman is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathand View Post
My thoughts on spreading out the music into the surrounds using Reverb/Delay style processing:

Be careful if your 5.1 mix will eventually be Folded-Down. Unless your intention was to add Reverb to the music, give it a dreamy feel, place it spatially, etc. you are inadvertently adding it everywhere music plays. Was that what you had in mind when you first mixed the scene in 5.1 - to make the music "wet"? Doubt it. At least that's not what typically comes to my mind when mixing in music. Of course use Reverb to get out of cues or in the ways mentioned above but I don't have a Reverb plug-in on my Music bus in order to ALWAYS apply a little bit of Reverb to my Music Stem.

What do you think Tom - BS?
Well, your point is well taken, but you've got to get it back there somehow. I always have the stereo fold-down in mind when I do this, and I've been doing it pretty successfully for many years.

The score cues usually come mixed in 5.1 so this doesn't really apply so much to score, but if you're getting only a stereo mix then this would apply to that as well,. Generally, if I use reverb, which I often do on source cues, I keep it short and use it very sparingly. And many times source cues require some use of perspective so reverb is a natural solution.

It's just a matter of being careful about what kind and how much. In most cases I don't find that it folds down any worse than many of the 5.1 expander plugins.
#15
11th February 2013
Old 11th February 2013
  #15
Moderator
 
narcoman's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 11,680

narcoman is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Fleischman View Post
and I've been doing it pretty successfully for many years.
I'll say !!!
#16
16th February 2013
Old 16th February 2013
  #16
Gear addict
 
jujufactory's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Paris
Posts: 309

jujufactory is offline
I'm a director and I just finished a musical feature movie and we spent 18 days mixing it with a professional movie Mixer. On my timeline I saw the movie in Stereo and when we went mixing it in 5.1, most of the work was about that center dialog track. The mixer spent 80% of his time EQ'ing the center channel dialog. The left and right original stereo barely changed. As for the back speakers, they barely affected the overall mix. In conclusion, he only real difference between 2.0 and 5.1 is that you ad a dialog track in the middle. Mixing 5.1 is all about knowing how to EQ that center track. As for the two extra speakers in the back, they don't really matter that much. To me there is no real difference between 2.1 and 5.1. The key item is that center track. Getting a good center track is where the mixer's experience comes in.
#17
16th February 2013
Old 16th February 2013
  #17
Moderator
 
narcoman's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 11,680

narcoman is offline
Depends on the project but you'll be surprised what shenanigans we send back there! I mix score for film and there's always a little something something supporting the front. The trick is to not distract but there is certainly an immersivevdifferencevwhen you switch the surround off.
#18
16th February 2013
Old 16th February 2013
  #18
Lives for gear
 
Henchman's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: LA, USA
Posts: 8,583
My Recordings/Credits

Henchman is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by jujufactory View Post
I'm a director and I just finished a musical feature movie and we spent 18 days mixing it with a professional movie Mixer. On my timeline I saw the movie in Stereo and when we went mixing it in 5.1, most of the work was about that center dialog track. The mixer spent 80% of his time EQ'ing the center channel dialog. The left and right original stereo barely changed. As for the back speakers, they barely affected the overall mix. In conclusion, he only real difference between 2.0 and 5.1 is that you ad a dialog track in the middle. Mixing 5.1 is all about knowing how to EQ that center track. As for the two extra speakers in the back, they don't really matter that much. To me there is no real difference between 2.1 and 5.1. The key item is that center track. Getting a good center track is where the mixer's experience comes in.
Well, for a musical, that's a pretty boring mix then.
As I have done musicals, and am just finishing a movie with some big musical performances. And I certainly have a lot going on in the surrounds. The UPM-1 Unwrap does amazing things with a stereo music track, that really envelops you in the music. And an 18 day mix should have given you a great mix, tat should sound much nicer in 5.1 than in stereo.

If I remember correctly, you posted about this movie before. That you had to take elsewhere, because the first person wasn't working out. Sounds like the 2nd guy didn't do much better.
#19
17th February 2013
Old 17th February 2013
  #19
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 606

smurfyou is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by jujufactory View Post
I'm a director and I just finished a musical feature movie and we spent 18 days mixing it with a professional movie Mixer. On my timeline I saw the movie in Stereo and when we went mixing it in 5.1, most of the work was about that center dialog track. The mixer spent 80% of his time EQ'ing the center channel dialog. The left and right original stereo barely changed. As for the back speakers, they barely affected the overall mix. In conclusion, he only real difference between 2.0 and 5.1 is that you ad a dialog track in the middle. Mixing 5.1 is all about knowing how to EQ that center track. As for the two extra speakers in the back, they don't really matter that much. To me there is no real difference between 2.1 and 5.1. The key item is that center track. Getting a good center track is where the mixer's experience comes in.
If that's all the difference there is I guess everyone here has been doing it wrong.
__________________
~Will
#20
17th February 2013
Old 17th February 2013
  #20
Lives for gear
 
Pedantic Sound's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: NYC

Pedantic Sound is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by jujufactory View Post
Mixing 5.1 is all about knowing how to EQ that center track. As for the two extra speakers in the back, they don't really matter that much. To me there is no real difference between 2.1 and 5.1. The key item is that center track. Getting a good center track is where the mixer's experience comes in.
...
#21
17th February 2013
Old 17th February 2013
  #21
Lives for gear
 
soundboy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 896

soundboy is offline
So many of the 5.1 questions can be answered with just some critical listening. Get a DVD of a movie you like the sound of, and listen to it! What is coming out of the center channel? What is coming out of the Left and Right? Surrounds. With the right movie, that's a master class right there!
LISTEN!
#22
18th February 2013
Old 18th February 2013
  #22
Gear addict
 
jujufactory's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Paris
Posts: 309

jujufactory is offline
Some of the greatest Musicals came out before anybody even knew what the word STEREO meant.
#23
19th February 2013
Old 19th February 2013
  #23
Lives for gear
 
Henchman's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: LA, USA
Posts: 8,583
My Recordings/Credits

Henchman is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by jujufactory View Post
Some of the greatest Musicals came out before anybody even knew what the word STEREO meant.
That's called making excuses.

Is your movie done in black and white?
#24
19th February 2013
Old 19th February 2013
  #24
Gear nut
 
t_young's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 91

t_young is offline
Don't feed the trolls
#25
19th February 2013
Old 19th February 2013
  #25
Gear addict
 
jujufactory's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Paris
Posts: 309

jujufactory is offline
First of all, once we get past the technical hoopla, the facts settle in. The fact is that most people in the audience will never notice the difference between 2.1 and 5.1. Most will see the film in a movie theater where the volume is set by the projectionist either too high or generally too low and with the surround speakers often off. I have witnessed it countless times. The remaining majority of people will wind up seeing the movie on their home flatscreen TV's. In those home televisions setups, most people will watch in 2.0, some in 2.1 as most everybody won't have the steakers behing the couch to get the 5.1 effet. Either way 95% of the peole will wind up seeing the 5.1 mix in either 2.1 or 2.0. I won't even discuss the fact half the people will probably see the movie on their IPad wearing headphones. Now whether you guys like it or not, stereo remains the norm, and 2.1 is the upper limit of what one can be considered a widely used norm. The 5.1 has always been and will probably continue to be a Dolby Marketing achievement which mixers adore but the general audience could barely care less about. As for 7.1 and above, I will only say that this format is a total pipedream and NOBODY will ever adopt it outside of high en movie theaters (and the audience will never hear the difference). These are the facts, and therefore a movie should never rely of anything beyond stereo to work. The 2.1 mix appears to be a reasonable extra because of the wide screen problem in theaters. Beyond that it's just marketing to justify charging a client an arm and a leg to get a "5.1" mix.
#26
19th February 2013
Old 19th February 2013
  #26
Gear maniac
 
Jussi's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: London

Jussi is offline
[QUOTE=jujufactory;8762512]The 2.1 mix appears to be a reasonable extra because of the wide screen problem in theaters. .[/QUOTE

You do know what the .1 means?
#27
19th February 2013
Old 19th February 2013
  #27
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,465

apple-q is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by jujufactory View Post
These are the facts, and therefore a movie should never rely of anything beyond stereo to work. The 2.1 mix appears to be a reasonable extra because of the wide screen problem in theaters. Beyond that it's just marketing to justify charging a client an arm and a leg to get a "5.1" mix.
You clearly have no idea what you're talking about.

Where is your "center" when you screen that oh so great 2.1 mix of yours?

You do know that 2.1 means L/R plus subwoofer, do you?

You constantly talk about getting the center-"track" right and at the same time rave about a format that doesn't even have a center-track: 2.1

????

2.1 doesn't even exist as a track-format. There are 2.1 home-theatre systems that have 2.1 monitoring with stereo plus a bass-managed subwoofer (that play a downmix of the 5.1 over a cheapo home system) but there is no such thing as a 2.1 mix. Neither on DVDs nor in theatres.
#28
19th February 2013
Old 19th February 2013
  #28
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,465

apple-q is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by jujufactory View Post
First of all, once we get past the technical hoopla, the facts settle in. The fact is that most people in the audience will never notice the difference between 2.1 and 5.1.
total nonsense. ANYone (apart from you maybe) will notice a missing physical center-speaker in the theatre.
Anyone seated slightly outside the sweet spot will otherwise hear the dialog hard left or hard right.
#29
19th February 2013
Old 19th February 2013
  #29
Lives for gear
 
Pedantic Sound's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: NYC

Pedantic Sound is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by jujufactory View Post
The fact is that most people in the audience will never notice the difference between 2.1 and 5.1. Most will see the film in a movie theater where the volume is set by the projectionist either too high or generally too low and with the surround speakers often off. I have witnessed it countless times. The remaining majority of people will wind up seeing the movie on their home flatscreen TV's. In those home televisions setups, most people will watch in 2.0, some in 2.1 as most everybody won't have the steakers behing the couch to get the 5.1 effet. Either way 95% of the peole will wind up seeing the 5.1 mix in either 2.1 or 2.0. I won't even discuss the fact half the people will probably see the movie on their IPad wearing headphones. Now whether you guys like it or not, stereo remains the norm, and 2.1 is the upper limit of what one can be considered a widely used norm. The 5.1 has always been and will probably continue to be a Dolby Marketing achievement which mixers adore but the general audience could barely care less about. As for 7.1 and above, I will only say that this format is a total pipedream and NOBODY will ever adopt it outside of high en movie theaters (and the audience will never hear the difference). These are the facts, and therefore a movie should never rely of anything beyond stereo to work. The 2.1 mix appears to be a reasonable extra because of the wide screen problem in theaters. Beyond that it's just marketing to justify charging a client an arm and a leg to get a "5.1" mix.
I think you are confusing fact with opinion. Dolby Atmos would like a word with you.
#30
19th February 2013
Old 19th February 2013
  #30
Gear addict
 
TRCS's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 410

TRCS is online now
Quote:
Originally Posted by apple-q View Post
total nonsense. ANYone (apart from you maybe) will notice a missing physical center-speaker in the theatre.
Anyone seated slightly outside the sweet spot will otherwise hear the dialog hard left or hard right.
I do sound at my church (in a movie theatre) and can't stand having the dialogue coming from the L and R... and its exactly that- unless you're directly in the sweet spot it sounds really bad. I'm pushing for a middle array... we'll see what happens...
New Reply Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook  Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter  Submit Thread to LinkedIn LinkedIn  Submit Thread to Google+ Google+ 
 
Topic:
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
videoteque / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music & Location Recording
8
the247s / Mastering forum
3
Gerax / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music & Location Recording
6
jwh1192 / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music & Location Recording
5
Gerax / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music & Location Recording
13

Forum Jump

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.