fixing distorted sound
vudoo
Thread Starter
#1
6th November 2007
Old 6th November 2007
  #1
Lives for gear
 

Thread Starter
fixing distorted sound

I'm mixing an indie film where the sound was so poorly recorded. Basically, it peaks-distorts ( recorded level was way too hot ) in many places. Is there a plug-in or something to ease off the crakling resulted from the distortion. I have the Waves and Waves arts restoration but it does not help at all. Thanks
#2
6th November 2007
Old 6th November 2007
  #2
Lives for gear
 
darkwater's Avatar
 

Try to get them to spring for an ADR session, and use sound effects library and foley for the sound design.

I know this isn't what you asked for, but if it's that broken, there's no a lot you can do to fix it, except re-record. Maybe if you show them how bad it is, they'll cough up the dough.

Good luck. That's a tough spot.
#3
6th November 2007
Old 6th November 2007
  #3
Gear nut
 
soundeziner's Avatar
 

the pencil tool and a freakin huge invoice
#4
6th November 2007
Old 6th November 2007
  #4
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santacore's Avatar
 

You're pretty much screwed but there are some tools that can help. Like soundeziner said you can clean up some of the distortion with the pencil. It's a long painfull process and sometimes can sound worse then the distortion itself, but worth a try. The other option would be to use a plugin like the Waves De-Crackle. I know you said you've tried it, but I've had some luck using it in the past. You have to put the faders to the roof and then run it through a few times. It generally will always make at least a small improvement. The other option is trying the noise reduction bundle from Izotope called RX. I recently downloaded the demo and thought the whole package sounded really good. So much so that I ended up buying the bundle. Give there de-clipper a try, it might do wonders.
#5
6th November 2007
Old 6th November 2007
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by santacore View Post
The other option is trying the noise reduction bundle from Izotope called RX. I recently downloaded the demo and thought the whole package sounded really good. So much so that I ended up buying the bundle. Give there de-clipper a try, it might do wonders.
I will second Izotope RX. They had a great demo at AES and I downloaded the demo version as well. It sounds great and is relatively simple to use. The cool thing about it is you can listen to what you're removing to make sure you don't remove something you want to keep. I just used it today on some nasty dialogue recorded on a research ship in the middle of the ocean. There is a little waver in the dialogue but it had a big job to do removing the diesel engines, waves, and motors of some research equipment.
#6
7th November 2007
Old 7th November 2007
  #6
Gear addict
 

Its a long shot, but check the original tapes. If the movie was shot HD or DV, and if the editor wasn'tt paying attention, it can be captured too hot. On a few occasions I have gotten location audio that sounded terrible and by luck I heard the original tape and that was the case. Now pain to re capture the proper audio after the edit was done, but it was easier than the pencil tool or ADR
#7
7th November 2007
Old 7th November 2007
  #7
Gear addict
 

These are all fine suggestions. I relay to people that often trying to correct distorted audio is like trying to unburn an overcooked chicken. Your best bet is likely lots of ADR and foley, (recreate a reasonable facsimile of the original chicken). I've worked on films so poorly recorded that we had to ADR the whole thing...which is about as pleasant as an appendectomy without anesthesia. Good luck

-SFX
#8
7th November 2007
Old 7th November 2007
  #8
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spiderman's Avatar
I did a film with a section of TOTALLY CLIPPED audio from an onboard cam. I fixed it with Wave Arts Noise Reduction. I zoomed in and processed lots of small areas and did some selective gain reduction.

At the end of the day the director was really pleased.

Definitely charge for it.... took me a few hours.
#9
7th November 2007
Old 7th November 2007
  #9
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starcrash13's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by soundguydave View Post
Its a long shot, but check the original tapes.
This happens more than you'd think. I've worked on two feature films in the last couple of years where the OMF was completely hosed, but the original files were pristine.
#10
8th November 2007
Old 8th November 2007
  #10
Gear maniac
 

I've tried a lot of different plugs over the years and haven't had much luck, but the new Izotope RX works pretty well and is fast.

Check it out...
vudoo
Thread Starter
#11
8th November 2007
Old 8th November 2007
  #11
Lives for gear
 

Thread Starter
Thanks everyone for your valuable inputs...i just downloaded IsotopeRX, i will give it a try.
BTW, is there a big advantage in owning the Advanced RX version. Obviously, it has more control and parameters to fiddle with, but from experience, i find that is not always a better thing.
#12
1st June 2008
Old 1st June 2008
  #12
Gear interested
 

Not much you can do really .if the dialouge is clipping and distorted .its prety much game over .ADR is your best bet way to go .soudsoap.bnr.or the waves restoration bundle wont help if its been badly recorded
#13
1st June 2008
Old 1st June 2008
  #13
Look at some of Izotope's new restoration software. Pretty new, pretty amazing what it can do.
#14
2nd June 2008
Old 2nd June 2008
  #14
Lives for gear
 
DSD_Mastering's Avatar
 

I use the Algorithmix stuff. ScratchFree (the Digital and Clip settings on the left) and NoiseFree.
ReNOVAtor is pretty awesome too.

Regards,
Bruce
#15
2nd June 2008
Old 2nd June 2008
  #15
Gear Head
 
MixinMonkey's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by starcrash13 View Post
This happens more than you'd think. I've worked on two feature films in the last couple of years where the OMF was completely hosed, but the original files were pristine.
This has happened to me too. OMF sounded like crap, but the source files were good. It's worth checking at least 1 cut/take to compare and double check.
#16
4th June 2008
Old 4th June 2008
  #16
Gear Head
 
PostFade's Avatar
 

Yes,the introduction of DV cameras was not good news to us in post sound. Everybody just drove into the red and digital clipping on a grand scale resulted. (oh and the cameraman now does the sound of course!)
I was getting OMFs on CD-Rs and realised that the 'all bits' used up meant that the CD-R burning did make the square-ing even worse. Do get Hard Drive transfers and I agree that going back to the source tapes can be good move.
I'll also take a look at the RX mentioned, but so far I use De-click and De-Crackle. You do have to take repeated bites at any clipped peaks with them though.
DaveT
PostFade
#17
4th June 2008
Old 4th June 2008
  #17
Gear maniac
 

just for the record, (no pun intended), there is a Noise Reduction package from the makers of Sound Forge that includes a de-clipper. It supposedly calculates what the clipped peak would have been like from the trajectory of surrounding samples. It rounds the top of the reconstructed peak, pushes it back down into dynamic range, and limits the areas around the peak to make it sound more natural.

I haven't tried it, but I was tempted. the thing that turned me off about it is that it comes as DirectX plugins. I ended up just manually resculpting the peaks in Cool Edit 2000 using the spectral and waveform views and the envelope tool. It was time consuming but it worked.
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