Login / Register
 
Second guitar out of time
New Reply
Subscribe
Suburban Kid
Thread Starter
#1
23rd August 2013
Old 23rd August 2013
  #1
Gear interested
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Posts: 5

Thread Starter
Suburban Kid is offline
Second guitar out of time

Hey,

I recorded 2 different guitar tracks for the chorus with different distortions, looks as though one of the guitars starts out fine, but 3/4 of the riff is slightly out of time with the other.

What's the best way to fix this without having to re-record?

Cheers
#2
23rd August 2013
Old 23rd August 2013
  #2
Moderator
 
matt thomas's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2004
Location: New Zealand/Switzerland/guitar case
Posts: 9,714

matt thomas is offline
Best idea is to bit the bullet and play it again.

If for some reason you really can't, then just edit the take so that it is in time with the first one.

matt
Quote
1
#3
23rd August 2013
Old 23rd August 2013
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 747

PhilDW is offline
I don't know if this applies without knowing exactly what you've got, but sometimes you can gate the out-of-time thing to something (snare or maybe the other guitar) so that the gate opens when the other instrument plays. It may sound too fake if it's prominent in the mix.
#4
23rd August 2013
Old 23rd August 2013
  #4
Gear nut
 
Joined: Jan 2013
Posts: 92

LBTM is offline
newer versions of melodyne have that feature to edit even chords, so you could fix it with that. but seriously, if that's possible re-record it.
#5
29th August 2013
Old 29th August 2013
  #5
Gear interested
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 17

Hikousen is offline
Yeah it's pretty hard to tell what you've got since we can't hear it. What DAW are you using? In Pro Tools you can activate elastic audio (I like x-form) and try to stretch certain parts back into place. As long as the changes aren't too drastic and you play around a bit, it's possible to get some really natural sounding alterations.
#6
29th August 2013
Old 29th August 2013
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 878

Xander is offline
I edit guitars manually all the time. If the distortion is not heavy, it's easy to see the transients. If its very heavy and it's hard to pick out transients, you can usually see where it changes pitch in the waveform anyway.

Recording DI as you record the guitar gives you a great guide for editing.
__________________
http://www.xandermoser.com
#7
29th August 2013
Old 29th August 2013
  #7
Lives for gear
 
Fizzyhair's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Cornwall UK
Posts: 534

Fizzyhair is offline
Protools has "Elastic Audio" and "TCE" google these features and you will u lock a whole new level of power in protools!
__________________
Quick! There's time 2B Wasted!

Long Time Allen Heath and Presonus user!
#8
29th August 2013
Old 29th August 2013
  #8
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 878

Xander is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fizzyhair View Post
Protools has "Elastic Audio" and "TCE" google these features and you will u lock a whole new level of power in protools!
In my experience, I find manual cutting and cross fading to be much more transparent.
Quote
1
#9
29th August 2013
Old 29th August 2013
  #9
Gear Head
 
Nielsbeard's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 67

Nielsbeard is offline
I have had some success with a side-chain gate using the "in-time" guitar track track as the key.
__________________
Niels Hempel
Owner-Engineer at http://www.bluewatersound.com
Sales/Technician at http://www.tri-tronicsproelectronics.com
#10
1st September 2013
Old 1st September 2013
  #10
Lives for gear
 
Fizzyhair's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Cornwall UK
Posts: 534

Fizzyhair is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander View Post
In my experience, I find manual cutting and cross fading to be much more transparent.
To be fair I think the answer is a combination of all the above methods! I think we all agree there's a lot of methods to achieve what you want. Most of them are listed. So try them all! That way you have learnt all these skills and you can mix n match to taste :-)
#11
1st September 2013
Old 1st September 2013
  #11
Gear maniac
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Posts: 228

F.M. is offline
+1 to manually cutting and fading. If to get in close on the wave and cut at zero crossings at the same part if a wave form you can get away with a lot. Stretching in melodyne or pt or whatever always sounds crummy in guitars to me.
Quote
1
#12
1st September 2013
Old 1st September 2013
  #12
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 878

Xander is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by F.M. View Post
+1 to manually cutting and fading. If to get in close on the wave and cut at zero crossings at the same part if a wave form you can get away with a lot. Stretching in melodyne or pt or whatever always sounds crummy in guitars to me.
Exactly. I always cut and move the sections so that the waveforms like up perfectly. Then I do an equal-gain cross fade. It's completely undetectable. I do the same thing with vocals when I have to do tough edits of words (either cutting takes together in the middle of a word, or shortening or lengthening a word on a double or harmony track to match the lead)
Quote
1
#13
1st September 2013
Old 1st September 2013
  #13
Gear interested
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Location: Italy
Posts: 29

Friedrik83 is offline
+1 to manually cutting and fading. The best would be to record two "perfect" takes. I used to record the first one, muting it, do the second one, pan the two and listen. Most of the time the result was excellent, but now I keep the first track in my monitors (panned hard left or right) and try not only to do exactly the same thing, but also to play "with" the other guitar.
In case of really out-of-time guitar, I'd edit it note by note, comparing it costantly with the other.
New Reply Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook  Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter  Submit Thread to LinkedIn LinkedIn  Submit Thread to Google+ Google+ 
 
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.