Steep Cliff Around 16k
Old 3rd February 2013
  #1
Gear interested
 

Thread Starter
Steep Cliff Around 16k



I think this is a newbie question...

Well you'll see inside the red box that there is a steep cliff around 16k.
I was wondering how people achieve this kind of super steep roll-off.
Is this due to analog consoles? I've tried many different methods using my own ITB setup but just can't make it to roll off that steep.
I noticed tape machines usually have this function but hell can't figure it out.

I'm not sure if this "achievement" means anything to the song or the production itself but it reeks of a professional mix. Most of the waveforms I've come across, at least the commercial ones, have this steep cliff. Is there a certain jargon to call this thing?

It just looks cool too
Old 3rd February 2013
  #2
Gear maniac
 
AndreBenoit's Avatar
 

A simple hi-cut EQ on the master out could achieve how that looks, either that or you are looking at an analysis of a lowish bit rate mp3 (128kbps or less)

Andre
Old 3rd February 2013
  #3
Gear interested
 

Thread Starter
Thanks for your quick reply
You were right, it was 128kbps with a 44kHz.
I never would've thought it had to do with a low bit rate mp3.

And about the EQ...
Maybe it depends on the different brand of hi-cut EQs out there but mine sure doesn't do that haha. It almost never produces that 90 degree cut.
Old 3rd February 2013
  #4
Gear maniac
 
AndreBenoit's Avatar
 

Mp3 is a "lossy" format, the price you pay for having that nice compact little tune is a shorter frequency range & the lower the bit rate, the shorter range. Many adults can't hear past 16k so the loss doesn't matter but it can be quite audible on a high end system & it's the reason you should really stick to .wav or .aiff for your projects in my opinion! You get that steep roll off because there literally is no information past 16k, although I'm sure even the stock EQ in logic could do similar with a -48dB cut

Andre
Old 3rd February 2013
  #5
these (free) filters will give you up to 120dB per octave slope...
MBandPass
Old 3rd February 2013
  #6
Gear interested
 

Thread Starter
Thanks for you info Andre!

Yeah, I noticed that younger kids hear better on the higher frequencies (above 16k and even 20k).

But there is a significant difference on the high frequencies when I use a tape machine that has the option of switching to 7.5 ips. When I turn back to 15 ips, the mix seems to "open up" as I would like to think. This rolls of a lot more than the 16k right?
Old 3rd February 2013
  #7
Gear interested
 

Thread Starter
Wow... a 120dB slope? I've never seen a slope that steep!

The largest I've seen was a 48dB and no more. I should definitely try this out, thanks
Old 3rd February 2013
  #8
Gear maniac
 
AndreBenoit's Avatar
 

You're quite welcome!
I'm not sure where your tape machine will roll off but a lot of the atmosphere & air in a mix lies in the rough 14-16kHz area so yes, your sound will feel like it opens up a lot if its gaining all that air at the flick of a switch.
I dont think that steep slope is anything you should be aspiring to, there's still people who will appreciate your efforts in those last 4kHz & instruments which produce them, it's certainly not a sign of a killer mix...just that you perhaps listen to too many mp3's!
Viva le .wav re-evolution!

Andre
Topic:
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
asdfdsa / So much gear, so little time!
4
Dave Reid / So much gear, so little time!
3
blinkSaunders / Mastering forum
10
logicll / Music Computers
1
soupking / High end
4

Forum Jump
 
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.