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high pass filter on electric guitar
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mike565
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#1
17th July 2012
Old 17th July 2012
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high pass filter on electric guitar

now another thread but this time on guitar, I wonder if I should use the high pass up to 250.0 hz to take off the rumbling parts on guitars but it will change the sound significantly to the point it sounds pretty canned but takes off the rumblies. any suggestions from your experience on high pass filter on distorted guitar.
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17th July 2012
Old 17th July 2012
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I always high pass guits somewhere between 150-350hz.
mike565
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17th July 2012
Old 17th July 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Mordo View Post
I always high pass guits somewhere between 150-350hz.
thanks for the tip between those hz i know it sounds a lil more uncanny between 150 - 200
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17th July 2012
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You don't need to high-pass that high just to remove mud. If it's a sparse arrangement, the guitars will end up sounding thin that way. At first, try to high-pass around the lowest note the guitar plays, and remove the mud separately with a bell filter, then listen if it sounds good.
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17th July 2012
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For me, HPF frequency can vary depending on the track but also within the track (e.g. by automating EQ). Usually HP between 100 and 400 Hz.
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17th July 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur Stone View Post
For me, HPF frequency can vary depending on the track but also within the track (e.g. by automating EQ). Usually HP between 100 and 400 Hz.
Good point, I do this sometimes.
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17th July 2012
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Have the full mix playing. Get the low cut, up the frequency of your cut until you hear it in the mix, then maybe back off a little again. Done. Don't do this without the mix on, because you follow a theoretical formula that doesn't require you to think within the song. BTW a low shelving filter has less overshoot at the crossover point, a low cut will accentuate/raise the crossover point a little in level, you may or may not like that.
It could be 40 Hz, it could be 300 Hz, you never know where the song wants the cut to be.
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17th July 2012
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I usually use some LPF as well on distorted guitar as low as 7-8k. Getting some fizz out actually makes the guitar sound warmer. This works better for me too if a guitar track is thin, warms it up some without boosting the low mids.
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17th July 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manfrensengensen View Post
I usually use some LPF as well on distorted guitar as low as 7-8k. Getting some fizz out actually makes the guitar sound warmer. This works better for me too if a guitar track is thin, warms it up some without boosting the low mids.
...also the slight resonant peak from a LPF (@ around 7-8kHz) can add presence to the guitar (in the mix) without it being too dominant.
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17th July 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frans View Post
Have the full mix playing. Get the low cut, up the frequency of your cut until you hear it in the mix, then maybe back off a little again. Done. Don't do this without the mix on, because you follow a theoretical formula that doesn't require you to think within the song. BTW a low shelving filter has less overshoot at the crossover point, a low cut will accentuate/raise the crossover point a little in level, you may or may not like that.
It could be 40 Hz, it could be 300 Hz, you never know where the song wants the cut to be.
+1
EQing tracks in solo is a complete waste of time, unless it is for repair work.
mike565
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18th July 2012
Old 18th July 2012
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[QUOTE=BillSimpkins;8077994]+1
EQing tracks in solo is a complete waste of time, unless it is for repair work.[/

for sure do it with the mix totally agree with you guys.
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