Login / Register
 
Music Engineering Degree at Miami?
New Reply
Subscribe
Funcoot
Thread Starter
#1
19th November 2011
Old 19th November 2011
  #1
Gear interested
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 7

Thread Starter
Funcoot is offline
Music Engineering Degree at Miami?

Disclaimer
I did a considerable amount of searching and I feel that a thread of my own would be appropriate.

I currently attend a local college Gulf Coast State College (just evolved from a community college this year). I've sat down with the head of the music technology program and had nice discussion about the program there. It is still very young, but is functional. There is a student run record label in which the program selects a local band and produces a record for free. The class is run in the form of labs in which students work on assigned projects. And after that long conversation with the head of the department, we seemed to get along very well and appear to be very like minded people.

I would be taking this class because it would pretty much show me the ropes, allow me to use professional/expensive equipment, network, the potential for open studio time, and I get paid to go to college right now (gotta love them pell grants). It honestly seems pretty logical to me, get paid to record and learn?

But what about the university level?
In the discussion with the head of the department, he mentioned University of Miami as a good program. Now I've done my research on this. I've heard it a million times in a million different ways. "Invest your money into studio equipment." "You will learn more in the field than at the school." "Experience over education." "There is no market for these degrees."

Now what I have gathered from most of these arguments, was that they were presented to schools that (as far as I know) do not really emphasize what Miami appears to according to their website.

Quote:
Music Engineering students are expected to demonstrate expertise in three principal areas: music, music engineering, and hardware or software engineering. Music skills are gained in courses such as music theory, arranging, music history and literature, and instrumental or voice study. Studio classes emphasize audio theory, digital audio, acoustics and studio design, microphone and mixing technique, sound synthesis, and video production. Courses in electrical engineering might include circuit theory, electronics, digital design, logic design, and microprocessors. Courses in computer engineering might include computer programming (C and C++), algorithm analysis, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and software engineering.
Also please check out the site and see for yourself. http://mue.music.miami.edu/degrees/b...ic-engineering

At Miami, your degree is a Bachelor of Science degree. They require you to minor in electrical engineering or computer engineering. Now, correct me if I'm wrong, but it appears as if Miami has something special going for them. Another thing I read, was that a lot Miami graduates not only go on to become recorders, but also engineers at companies such as Shure.

At a glance, it appears that Miami gives you tools that might be attractive to an employer or someone looking to become self employed in the field.

Am I getting the right impression, or is this all a fancy presentation that really isn't going to help me?

Anyone here currently attending Miami? Everybody's 2 cents are welcome, they'll only make me richer.
#2
19th November 2011
Old 19th November 2011
  #2
3 + infractions, forum membership suspended.
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: at home
Posts: 2,402

oldeanalogueguy is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Funcoot View Post
Disclaimer
I did a considerable amount of searching and I feel that a thread of my own would be appropriate.

I currently attend a local college Gulf Coast State College (just evolved from a community college this year). I've sat down with the head of the music technology program and had nice discussion about the program there. It is still very young, but is functional. There is a student run record label in which the program selects a local band and produces a record for free. The class is run in the form of labs in which students work on assigned projects. And after that long conversation with the head of the department, we seemed to get along very well and appear to be very like minded people.

I would be taking this class because it would pretty much show me the ropes, allow me to use professional/expensive equipment, network, the potential for open studio time, and I get paid to go to college right now (gotta love them pell grants). It honestly seems pretty logical to me, get paid to record and learn?

But what about the university level?
In the discussion with the head of the department, he mentioned University of Miami as a good program. Now I've done my research on this. I've heard it a million times in a million different ways. "Invest your money into studio equipment." "You will learn more in the field than at the school." "Experience over education." "There is no market for these degrees."

Now what I have gathered from most of these arguments, was that they were presented to schools that (as far as I know) do not really emphasize what Miami appears to according to their website.



Also please check out the site and see for yourself. B.S. in Music Engineering at MuE @ UM

At Miami, your degree is a Bachelor of Science degree. They require you to minor in electrical engineering or computer engineering. Now, correct me if I'm wrong, but it appears as if Miami has something special going for them. Another thing I read, was that a lot Miami graduates not only go on to become recorders, but also engineers at companies such as Shure.

At a glance, it appears that Miami gives you tools that might be attractive to an employer or someone looking to become self employed in the field.

Am I getting the right impression, or is this all a fancy presentation that really isn't going to help me?

Anyone here currently attending Miami? Everybody's 2 cents are welcome, they'll only make me richer.

miami is a top party school

i think you are confused
you pay them
they dont pay you to learn

the best is the ccs
they have practical classes
easier faster better cheaper to learn audio
then get your own gear and get more hands on practice


go to a uni
and get a degree ---
will take longer
cost more
but make you employable when you discover
that there are no jobs in audio

yes the miami presentation is slick
and leads down a different career path

dont buy into shure hiring every graduate
they dont need that many people

so where are the other folks working
i would like to see a survey of the last senior class
and ask them what they are doing now
#3
27th November 2011
Old 27th November 2011
  #3
Gear maniac
 
rvwainscott's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: LA
Posts: 270

Send a message via Yahoo to rvwainscott
rvwainscott is offline
Greetings,

My question to you would be: What can this University teach you that you can not learn online?

Seriously, what touchstone do they have hidden away that will make you employable?

By the time you finish school, there will be guys that have 4 or 5 years of very practical (each and every day) experience under their belts. More importantly, they will have CONNECTIONS which you just will not have.

You'll graduate with a nice piece of paper (maybe some debt as well) but your competition will already be so far ahead that you may never catch up.

I see young guys all the time pooling their money and putting together some small but hard hitting little studios. They learn how to construct a facility, how to wire up a facility, how to select gear and keep it running. They also learn the business side of the industry and how things really work. Your piece of paper just wont compete.
__________________
"All Creative work is a form of resistance."

www.blackboxanalog.com
#4
27th November 2011
Old 27th November 2011
  #4
3 + infractions, forum membership suspended.
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: at home
Posts: 2,402

oldeanalogueguy is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by rvwainscott View Post
Greetings,

My question to you would be: What can this University teach you that you can not learn online?

Seriously, what touchstone do they have hidden away that will make you employable?

By the time you finish school, there will be guys that have 4 or 5 years of very practical (each and every day) experience under their belts. More importantly, they will have CONNECTIONS which you just will not have.

You'll graduate with a nice piece of paper (maybe some debt as well) but your competition will already be so far ahead that you may never catch up.

I see young guys all the time pooling their money and putting together some small but hard hitting little studios. They learn how to construct a facility, how to wire up a facility, how to select gear and keep it running. They also learn the business side of the industry and how things really work. Your piece of paper just wont compete.
and how do these guys entice suckers
er.....
customers when they still are green behind the ears
and using low end gear in a small facility when there are
big studios with credentials and resumes that blow them away working for less trying to compete with all these guys who think they can start a studio and learn on the job
#5
27th November 2011
Old 27th November 2011
  #5
Lives for gear
 
fastlanestoner's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,732

Send a message via AIM to fastlanestoner Send a message via MSN to fastlanestoner
fastlanestoner is offline
It's all about connections and what you know. I was in an audio engineering thing, learned a lot but realized it was a dead end.

It did get me in to more advanced electronics which I study now.
__________________

Guitar/Backline Tech and Mobile Recording services in the Los Angeles area!
Custom stompboxes and cabling for stage and studio.

Die-hard Phila Eagles fan!
#6
22nd December 2011
Old 22nd December 2011
  #6
Gear maniac
 
rvwainscott's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: LA
Posts: 270

Send a message via Yahoo to rvwainscott
rvwainscott is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldeanalogueguy View Post
and how do these guys entice suckers
er.....
customers when they still are green behind the ears
and using low end gear in a small facility when there are
big studios with credentials and resumes that blow them away working for less trying to compete with all these guys who think they can start a studio and learn on the job
Well, some people have the balls to pull it off. Also, I didn't say anything about cheap gear. Next, given that hip hop and electronic music is pretty much where everything is going, a large live room just isn't needed nor a large format console. Two or three top quality signal chains are all that are needed.

Next, of course they can compete on price because they do not have a large format console to air condition or big rooms with 22' tall ceilings.

All of this can be done without handing your money to a school.
#7
22nd December 2011
Old 22nd December 2011
  #7
Gear interested
 
Joined: Dec 2010
Location: Calgary
Posts: 27

audiobong is offline
Out of 24 graduates I was the only one that got a job in a pro studio. I attribute this to a great work placement through my college and the fact I busted my ass doing as much grunt work as possible during this placement. A friend of mine VOLUNTEERED at a studio to learn and get his foot in the door. He can now make a mean cup of coffee (and he's a great engineer) If you are going to learn as you go consider investing the bulk of your money on acoustic treatments so your mixes translate well. Gear can be rented and purchased as you go/need it. Above all just make music. If you wait for the perfect conditions some of your best ideas may never be realized. Good luck!
#8
24th December 2011
Old 24th December 2011
  #8
Gear interested
 
Fourscorestudios's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Portland
Posts: 14

Fourscorestudios is offline
Well while I don’t go to Miami, I am an audio engineering student studying at Montana State University, and I have a degree in audio engineering from a one year program at Clackamas Community College in Oregon, so I can give you a little bit of insight. The problem that I am finding with the higher education programs in audio engineering, is while they teach you lots of about the theory of recording, its not possible either budget or time wise to give you enough hands on experience. The programs are also very intense and very time consuming, I bust my ass form any where between 16 to 18 hours a day on just projects and practice, and sadly a lot of what I have learned wont be as useful once I am out of school and trying to find a job. A lot of the people who I know who have graduated from either of the programs, haven’t had a lot of luck finding work, which is pretty typical of audio engineers. So in my opinion you have to really want to be an audio engineer if your going do the program. So on the side outside of school I work part time at my church as an audio contractor mixing services live as well as running live web feeds. I also have a bunch of my own gear that I use to help make recordings for a self run company that I started to get some hands on practice. The one things I can say in favor of the audio programs is they do give you the opportunity to meet lots of other students who are going through the same thing that you, and can give you the chance to meet other people in the industry who can help make connections to different studios and companies. I hope this helpful in making your decision. If you are interested in looking at other programs I would suggest looking at Montana’s four year degree. Its one of the best programs I have seen so far. Best of Luck.
#9
24th December 2011
Old 24th December 2011
  #9
Lives for gear
 
Howie J's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 764

Howie J is offline
A couple things I see about this question that differs from some others. Many are talking about 1-2 year schools and credit transfers and such. There is definitely a legitimate discussion in the pro/con with those schools. I have a degree from one. I also have a Bachelor's in Music. Seems like neither has specifically been the thing that has brought me work...but both together have given me opportunities.

Miami has a damn good school of music. The Frost School of Music "ain't no joke". There are some very very fine musicians teaching there and some great players come out of that school. I think it gets overlooked a lot in the discussions of music schools when people talk about Northwestern, Indiana, CCM, Oberlin, etc. Plus...it's Miami...hello! (This is coming from a MN guy...)

The REALLY cool thing I like is the part where they require a CS or EE minor. I have a former student that wants to talk to me about sound/audio careers. I would tell him that audio just for audio sake...like studio or theater work...is tough. However, if you combine that with a CS or EE minor or double major you open the door to work in new control or DSP technology. Look at Georgia Tech's undergrad and grad programs as well as UCSB MAT program:Media Arts and Technology They are doing a lot of multimedia engineering where audio meets light/biometrics/etc.

Howie J
New Reply Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook  Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter  Submit Thread to LinkedIn LinkedIn  Submit Thread to Google+ Google+ 
 
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.