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Finding Your Voice as a Composer
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SonicAlchemist
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18th December 2012
Old 18th December 2012
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Finding Your Voice as a Composer

I wanted to open up discussion on this topic now that GearSlutz has its own "Music for Film" wing. Its a critical question - how does one develop their own unique - authentic - musical voice as a composer?

I'll start with my own thoughts and look forward to the contributions that follow.

1. I think our voice is first formed out of our limitations as composers. We simply cannot do what we cannot do.

2. Our voice is formed by what we are aware of, what we have been exposed to. The films we have watched, the music we have listened to.

3. Our voice is a function of our opinions. I am of the strong opinion that the more opinionated we are as composers, the more distinct of a voice we will develop. Without exception I will leave a movie theater with strong opinions about the score, with specifics in mind about scenes that should have been handled differently, and scenes that would done to utter perfection.

4. Our voice is hardest for us to hear. But I have found that we can tell as composers that we are developing our voice when we find ourselves confidently handling our cues just the way they ought to be handled, taking note of all the little decisions that absolutely MUST be correct. For young composers it is a big step forward when they notice the little decisions at all. Up until that point, these small opportunities will have been handled on auto-pilot. This auto-pilot itself can lead to a defining voice in that it can result in a composer's output sounding consistently similar. I find composer's voices to be more compelling when it is obvious that the smallest decisions are made with purpose and awareness as opposed to composers for whom this world is unknown.

5. Finding our voices is at the core of a healthy career. It is necessary in order to survive an economy with more supply than demand.

6. Finding our voices is at the heart of being able to have healthy relationships with other film composers, because it provides an environment where we can all co-exist without unhealthy degrees of jealousy and envy.

7. It is my opinion that, as an industry, the quality of film music would increase if composers honed in on their unique inner voices. I believe the value of film music would be more obvious to clients and the choice of composers would be more carefully made.

So to me this is a core issue on a number of levels. Curious to get your thoughts?
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18th December 2012
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About 90% of the stuff I do is soundtrackish stuff now... this coming from a commercial rap background. For years I thought, this sounds awful.. its nothing like what Im inspired by. Then, I began to think of myself as a musical instrument. You pluck a harp, and you hear a harp. You excite my brain, and you hear what I sound like... for better or worse.

Im much happier now, and much less prohibited by my artistic insecurities. They still exist, but i'm not boxing with them five days a week.
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18th December 2012
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one big problem is having/using your own voice when every music supe out there wants you to sound like someone else
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18th December 2012
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I try to avoid anything that I hear anybody else doing well.
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18th December 2012
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Originally Posted by Dave.R View Post
one big problem is having/using your own voice when every music supe out there wants you to sound like someone else
I understand why you say this, but this hasn't been my experience. I have found imitations are what music sup's fill their void with in the absence of composers in their price range having distinct voices. I don't think they revel in producing copycat scores. This does nothing to build their careers either.

I would love for a music supervisor to weigh in if any read this. . . .

I do not know a single director who would publicly admit they want an inauthentic score made by one composer imitating another. They would be humiliated. And rightly so, imo.

Again, director points of view welcome here. . . .

What they want is to know that they will get a score that works, and starting from a detailed temp score and keeping close to it is a proven method. And that is a tricky thing to navigate for us composers, no question. But it can be done in a way that preserves identity and voice.

The trick is to have a clear brand, and get auditioned for the project in those terms. Then, if you land the gig, you are hired to be yourself. And as a side benefit you can charge what you are worth, because there is only one you, and you is what they want.

All bets are off if you win the gig because you did the best Thomas Newman impersonation, and the film is temped with nothing but "American Beauty" and "The Horse Whisperer." Yeah, in that case I know what will happen.

Also it is not reasonable to expect to get to write in your voice if your brand is not clear, and your 'sound' is not plastered all over your demo reel and previous work.

Of course, this is not directed at you personally, DaveR, as I don't pretend to know anything about you. I'm just responding in generalities.
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18th December 2012
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Originally Posted by SonicAlchemist View Post
I do not know a single director who would publicly admit they want an inauthentic score made by one composer imitating another. They would be humiliated. And rightly so, imo.
one word again: temp

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Of course, this is not directed at you personally, DaveR, as I don't pretend to know anything about you. I'm just responding in generalities.
yes, of course
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18th December 2012
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Originally Posted by charlieclouser View Post
I try to avoid anything that I hear anybody else doing well.
i couldn't imitate anyone out there if i wanted to. it always veers way off. any semblance would be purely coincidental
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18th December 2012
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Originally Posted by Dave.R View Post
one word again: temp
Even the A-list composers with the most distinct voices have to compose from temp scores built from their colleagues's previous work. This in itself does not force our hands to be imitators.

But I agree it is a challenge. A whole thread could be dedicated to talking about how to handle temp scores.
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18th December 2012
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I think maybe you're over thinking this. I think "your voice" (not yours per se but ours collectively) is as simple as who you are. It's an amalgamation of all you've ever done, all you've ever written, what you enjoy listening to, what you eat, what you do to relax, what your spiritual vision is.

You sit down at the keyboard, console, guitar, note pad, score page......and out comes.......

Your Voice.


The end.


Those who I've know who have tried to follow the muse of current trends, popular music, A list composers or the whims of others vision inevitably fail. They betray their voice by the very act of trying to define and change it to meet outside expectations. Of course one must collaborate with directors, musicians, etc., but if you are merely being true to you, your voice will be heard - even when copying the temp.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it!
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18th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
I think maybe you're over thinking this. I think "your voice" (not yours per se but ours collectively) is as simple as who you are. It's an amalgamation of all you've ever done, all you've ever written, what you enjoy listening to, what you eat, what you do to relax, what your spiritual vision is.

You sit down at the keyboard, console, guitar, note pad, score page......and out comes.......

Your Voice.


The end.


Those who I've know who have tried to follow the muse of current trends, popular music, A list composers or the whims of others vision inevitably fail. They betray their voice by the very act of trying to define and change it to meet outside expectations. Of course one must collaborate with directors, musicians, etc., but if you are merely being true to you, your voice will be heard - even when copying the temp.
Ok, stop stop STOP!!! You are making too much sense....STOP IT!!!!!!

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18th December 2012
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Ok, stop stop STOP!!! You are making too much sense....STOP IT!!!!!!



I used to not believe in my voice. It was so........me. I used to fight against my voice. I used to try to bend and manipulate it. I used to try to conform it to my muse / needs / desires. The process chained me to industry conformity and dried up the muse. It was destructive musically, spiritually and financially. (In that order)

I had to grow to let it out. It took writing, recording, and mixing 17 CD's worth of finished product in one year - close to 600 minutes of finished music. (It was a pretty rough year.....) After that year, I knew my voice. I learned to embrace it and nurture it, grew to love it for the unique and serendipitous way it flows and I learned to manipulate it to come up with new and creative music while still being true to myself. more importantly, I learned where it flowed FROM, and ultimately found how to destroy writers block and creative road blocks once and for all.

Not an easy path. Or very glamorous. Not even that financially rewarding. But it was a joyous and life affirming time that opened my eyes to a lot of stuff that's "bigger than me". Quite the journey.

Not recommended unless you got the disease.....
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18th December 2012
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IMHO, you have to be sensitive to all that is life. Get out of the studio, meet and _listen_ to people of all ages and from all walks of life. Read great books, watch classic movies, go to parties, don't hide from difficult situations/places. Jam with other musicians. Do therapy. Cry. Listen to your older relatives. Watch more documentaries than you play video games. Get a shitty job for a few weeks. Get drunk, embarrass yourself, then apologize. Be vulnerable. Sit in front of your instrument for as long as it takes, until you finally crack that melody/chord progression. Believe in yourself, even when no one calls you to jam with, to work with, when no one checks out your stuff on soundcloud. Break up with a partner that you really thought you loved. Let someone cry on your shoulder, without saying a thing, as long as they need to.
If you don't have a voice after all that, you were never meant to be an artist. No biggie.
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28th December 2012
Old 28th December 2012
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Working for film directors is not particularly conductive to having an authentic voice
as a composer. The average film director today has a superficial understanding of music
and film making, has barely listened to contemporary classical music, and is too worried
about self image.

Even an acclaimed director as interesting and innovative as Bela Tarr, has a seemingly dreadfully limited concept of music in it's relation to filmaking. It is possible that mass culture has a worse effect on artists today than in the past, and that it is more necessary today to study music in depth in order to be freed somewhat of being conditioned by mass media.

Of course, there are many fine exceptions, but film music today is generally more about adapting to a director's limited concept, for better or worse.
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28th December 2012
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Originally Posted by aracu View Post
Working for film directors is not particularly conductive to having an authentic voice
as a composer. The average film director today has a superficial understanding of music
and film making, has barely listened to contemporary classical music, and is too worried
about self image.
...

Of course, there are many fine exceptions, but film music today is generally more about adapting to a director's limited concept, for better or worse.
Thanks to everybody who has added to the discussion - interesting points all.

I agree with you in that director's do not come to the film with an exposure level nor understanding of music to match ours. But this is to be expected. This is our specialty and of all the film disciplines, music requires the most training. The DP's, the screenwriters, the directors themselves - none of these disciplines commonly begin at age 4 or thereabouts, with conservatory level training throughout one's entire memorable life.

What I have found, though, is that directors know what they want when they encounter it. And if a composer has a unique voice and it permeates their work, then directors may resonate with it. This is the stage where the voice will either be indulged or stifled. The moment where the filmmaker discovers your music is the opportunity to educate them, expose them to what it is you do. This renders their limited familiarity with the larger musical canon moot.

It is my opinion that most composers do not trust directors to choose them if they sound like themselves. It risks losing work. And I also suspect many composers to not trust directors to be able to discern what is correct for their film musically. I do not share this belief.

When a composer writes in the homogenous style that naturally results from ultra close keeping with temp scores that all draw from the same small pool of material, this is not the point when the composer has chosen to deny their voice. (Or at very least, their voice will be buried and only audible to specialists in the field.) Rather, it happened when they pitched to the director and set themselves forward as a composer who does just that

Last edited by SonicAlchemist; 28th December 2012 at 04:03 PM.. Reason: for clarity
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28th December 2012
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Originally Posted by drBill View Post
I think maybe you're over thinking this. I think "your voice" (not yours per se but ours collectively) is as simple as who you are. It's an amalgamation of all you've ever done, all you've ever written, what you enjoy listening to, what you eat, what you do to relax, what your spiritual vision is.

You sit down at the keyboard, console, guitar, note pad, score page......and out comes.......

Your Voice.


The end.
I think we are just talking about different things. Sure, what someone writes is what they write. In that sense the question of original voice is uninteresting and useless - it is a tautology.

I am talking about the authentic voice that makes each composer unique - the one that requires nurturing - an adequate skill-set to execute - the one that is sure to be under construction as the composer gains the experience and mastery necessary to get closer to it. Not just whatever comes out, which is muddied by someone's limited exposure to musical possibilities, lack of technique or musical training, inexperience navigating the collaboration aspects of filmmaking, etc. . .

Consider John Williams. This is a composer with a voice. And I bring him up because his voice requires an immense mastery of numerous sub-disciplines. If you listen to his early work and move chronologically through time you will notice that he has always had the core gifts for timing and melody and superb musicianship; however you can observe him coming into his voice over time. The traits he has always had are indeed core to his voice. But his sense of orchestration (both for the traditional orchestra and for jazz orchestra and combos) are also core traits, and they have developed over time. You can listen to his violin concerto, and then to his more recent concert works such as TreeSong and feel the progression.

The voice I am interested in is this one - the one we have to chase, the one that requires a life-time of nurturing and personal development.
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28th December 2012
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Originally Posted by SonicAlchemist View Post
I think we are just talking about different things. Sure, what someone writes is what they write. In that sense the question of original voice is uninteresting and useless - it is a tautology.

I am talking about the authentic voice that makes each composer unique - the one that requires nurturing - an adequate skill-set to execute - the one that is sure to be under construction as the composer gains the experience and mastery necessary to get closer to it. Not just whatever comes out, which is muddied by someone's limited exposure to musical possibilities, lack of technique or musical training, inexperience navigating the collaboration aspects of filmmaking, etc. . .

Consider John Williams. This is a composer with a voice. And I bring him up because his voice requires an immense mastery of numerous sub-disciplines. If you listen to his early work and move chronologically through time you will notice that he has always had the core gifts for timing and melody and superb musicianship; however you can observe him coming into his voice over time. The traits he has always had are indeed core to his voice. But his sense of orchestration (both for the traditional orchestra and for jazz orchestra and combos) are also core traits, and they have developed over time. You can listen to his violin concerto, and then to his more recent concert works such as TreeSong and feel the progression.

The voice I am interested in is this one - the one we have to chase, the one that requires a life-time of nurturing and personal development.
You assume that was not the voice I was talking about. But it most certainly was. Your "voice" is something inherently unique to you and you alone. Craft is what takes a lifetime of nurturing and developing. I can trace my "voice" back to long before I could put pencil to paper, and long before computers existed to help make music. When it was imprinted in my psyche is a mystery though. Certainly it is developing, but it is not changing. At times I feel the "development" dilutes it's purity. Craft and skill-sets however, those take huge strides as we move forward.
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28th December 2012
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You assume that was not the voice I was talking about. But it most certainly was. Your "voice" is something inherently unique to you and you alone. Craft is what takes a lifetime of nurturing and developing. I can trace my "voice" back to long before I could put pencil to paper, and long before computers existed to help make music. When it was imprinted in my psyche is a mystery though. Certainly it is developing, but it is not changing. At times I feel the "development" dilutes it's purity. Craft and skill-sets however, those take huge strides as we move forward.
I think we more or less agree on this. The core identity of the voice will always be there. But there is a special relationship it shares with both skills and exposure to different musical ideas.

As another example, I'll bring up John Cage. Here is someone who clearly had a distinct and clear voice from the beginning. The intelligence, the philosophical underpinnings, the iconoclastic temperament.

Yet his voice wasn't something that was recognized by others until his skill set and his experiments brought him to a point where all the pieces came together in a way that allowed people outside of himself to really 'get' what he is about.

In my view the critical moment came when he was teaching at Cornish and stumbled upon prepared piano techniques.

So I think your point, drBill, elevates the discussion by clarifying it further. I am not simply interested in the voice existing within us, and driving our works. I do not believe anyone's voice has value simply by being their own. It must be paired with an appropriate level of technique and point of view in order to be interesting -- to even be discerned at all.

Building up the skill sets, the life-experiences, and the exposure to diverse musical ideas until our voice can be recognized by others as distinct and mature - and that brings something new to the table - that is the lofty goal. And my point is that I don't think it can be done on auto-pilot, at least for me. I find the discussion useful, but imagine many will not.

My tangential point is that to the extent we can do this as composers is the extent to which many of the problems we encounter on the business side of things will go away. Plus, it would certainly elevate the state of film music.
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28th December 2012
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So I think your point, drBill, elevates the discussion by clarifying it further. I am not simply interested in the voice existing within us, and driving our works. I do not believe anyone's voice has value simply by being their own. It must be paired with an appropriate level of technique and point of view in order to be interesting -- to even be discerned at all.
I think you're right. BUT, the tricky part is getting the technique and other obstacles OUT of the way so that the purity of your unique musical voice can be heard. Otherwise these distractions crowd in and take the place of "your voice". The "voice" in and of itself is childish, pure, serendipitous, spiritual in nature and unfettered. But the techniques used to reveal it to the world are matured, calculated, often material in perspective (ie: it's a JOB) and weighted down by the complexity of the process and the opinion of others.

To quote myself :

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I used to fight against my voice. I used to try to bend and manipulate it. I used to try to conform it to my muse / needs / desires. The process chained me to industry conformity and dried up the muse. It was destructive musically, spiritually and financially. (In that order)

This "process" you refer to is called maturation by some. It's called mastery of technique by others. It is most certainly called "success" in the marketplace. In many ways it's all 3. And in many ways, it was the death of or at least the disease afflicting my unique "voice".

To have a true voice while mastering your technique, maturing your craft, working and (hopefully) being successful in your career is very difficult.

This is not a musical question, not a gear question, not a technique question - at it's very core it is a spiritual question - whether one believes it or not. And to leave that un-addressed while chasing down and mastering these other necessities of career life leaves one bankrupt of voice. It is a very common thing in our business, and seems to grow exponentially the more experience one garners.

Guard your voice!!!
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28th December 2012
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To have a true voice while mastering your technique, maturing your craft, working and (hopefully) being successful in your career is very difficult.
Agreed.

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Guard your voice!!!
You bring up an important point. The process of developing technical mastery of skills such as counterpoint, harmony, orchestration, and so on necessarily takes the practitioner through stages of development where decisions are forced upon them. In the beginning, and well beyond, there are 'correct' ways to voice chords, to orchestrate, to use commonly shared figures and devices, to modulate, to structure a work, and so on. A composer's voice will be muffled until all the decisions s/he makes are her/his own. This is why composers are considered 'young' well into their 40's. This is no easy thing. There does come a point after the mastery of any skill that the decisions cease to be compulsory and are wielded with ultimate authority by the composer, where the conventions are at his/her command and whim.

As you say, its a philosophical/spiritual question. Some religious traditions have described this as needing to lose oneself to find oneself; to give away all they have in order to receive everything. It is my opinion that composers must go through a period where they put their voice on hold while they arm themselves with tools. Then, they can unleash something magical.

One's voice is easily guarded by not letting anything or anyone make his decisions for him - whether it is a convention that influences behind the scenes, unnoticed, or a dogma that is followed blindly.

The awareness of the thousands of little decisions we face and the conscious making of those decisions is key.
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29th December 2012
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Originally Posted by drBill View Post
I think maybe you're over thinking this. I think "your voice" (not yours per se but ours collectively) is as simple as who you are. It's an amalgamation of all you've ever done, all you've ever written, what you enjoy listening to, what you eat, what you do to relax, what your spiritual vision is.

You sit down at the keyboard, console, guitar, note pad, score page......and out comes.......

Your Voice.


The end. [...]
^^This. I would not have been able to word this better! Right on point. Good thread by the way!
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30th December 2012
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Our 'voice' is the essence of ourselves expressed in musical terms. When you don't put yourself into your music you have no 'voice'.
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30th December 2012
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How to find your voice in my book: Do your manuscript miles..
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1st January 2013
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Start by writing music that speaks to you, no matter how the industry might categorize it. Too many talented composers throughout history have either tried to write within the bounds of popular acceptance, or be the first to pioneer the next frontier of music, and left many of their own potentially great ideas unsaid.

Today's scoring world, as with pop music, has honed first concept to near perfection to soak up every last profitable drop of each trend as it appears. The next trends seem to happen almost by accident rather than as a result of the musically individualistic spirit of the composers of the day.

You are most likely to find your voice when you stop looking for something to call your voice.
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1st January 2013
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You are most likely to find your voice when you stop looking for something to call your voice.
I think there is a lot of wisdom in this observation.

My tweak/caveat would be that it is important to have periods of time when composers should review their body of work - maybe over a year or two, or maybe in shorter sections of 6 months - and evaluate how satisfied they are with it. Then would come a period of self-reflection (thinking about 'voice') and probably a resolution to develop certain skills (craft to help free the voice). But then, these thoughts should go into hibernation while the composer simply writes music until the next check-up.

I think of it like swimming - its useful to come up for air every once and a while to not only breathe, but make sure you're on course.
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1st January 2013
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Maybe one approach is to avoid using the same soundscape tools and synthesizers everyone else is using, Kontakt symphony libraries et rest. Use let's say obscure Reaktor modules, for example.
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My me experience as a working composer ( I feel the motives between writing for yourself and for money are different ) I think you find more of a voice of your own when you have a client (either repeat client or someone who likes your work) who trusts you to do what you think is best.

I'm lucky to have one client like this. I think however your voice is influenced by the music you enjoy (or maybe the composers who made you want to be a composer).
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