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#31
13th September 2012
Old 13th September 2012
  #31
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enecosse is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Camera View Post
Mac Pro is done.

Sorry to inform you of this.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6strings View Post
Great, Thanks! Do you have today's lottery numbers as well?
If his lottery numbers are as accurate then I'd like them too please

There's several indicators which point to his speculation being correct. Disagree? Ok. But I doubt there will be any more tower systems. They seem pretty intent on trying to usher in a "post PC era", whatever that means.

What it doesn't mean is that there won't be a multi-core, multi-CPU solution provided by Apple. It just won't be in the form of a traditional tower system. It'll be something which involves Thunderbolt. Part of the delay is likely to be the wait for Intel to deliver the necessary hardware to make it happen, and that won't come until next year.

Less than 2 years from now imagine a very power-efficient 60 core Haswell EX solution using DDR4 ram. Now imagine a relatively small box which can be plugged in to other Apple products, via a cable, and provide the same performance as you would get had you installed those 60 cores on the motherboard.

No tower still means angry people with a bunch of PCIE cards. But all that takes is a Magma style chassis, hooked up via Thunderbolt, during any "transition period".
#32
14th September 2012
Old 14th September 2012
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Those chassis are expensive though, like 500 to 1k.
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#33
14th September 2012
Old 14th September 2012
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enecosse View Post
It just won't be in the form of a traditional tower system. It'll be something which involves Thunderbolt.
There are several issues to deal with.

1. Graphics cards. There are no real, working Thunderbolt-solutions for folks using those beefy, dual slot cards for 3D and heavy graphics work. Integrated graphics and smaller on-board solutions may be fine for audio and pro-sumer video, but is Apple really going to drop this segment of power users completely? I don't think so.

2. Power users. This is the BIG issue with video professionals (I mean the guys working in TV and film, not the weekend-warrior wedding photographer/videographer). I imagine a lot of GS members would find a decked out Mac Mini or iMac perfectly suitable for their work load, but there is a segment of power users out there working with video who require the power of dual Xeon processors; something you simply can't fit in a portable chassis (including the iMac) due to cooling requirements. Rendering and compressing video is VERY CPU-intensive.

3. Cooling. As many mini and iMac users have attested to, running these machines hard pushes them to their heat tolerances and winds the fans up pretty good. A tower machine like the Mac Pro has plenty of CPU and cooling "headroom" to do heavy lifting without breaking too much of a sweat.

4. Thunderbolt-only expansion = Spaghetti Desktop! A more minor issue, but I believe expecting professionals to hook up ALL their peripheral drives, devices, interfaces, PCI cards, etc. via Thunderbolt will mean a plethora of cables, power supplies and interconnecting cords cluttering up the desktop like you've never imagined! (never mind your multi-channel interface's audio cables) Hardly a "professional" solution, IMHO.

These are issues Apple will have to consider when designing a new Mac Pro. Although many would love Thunderbolt to take over expansion duties, the reality is that there's more to a pro machine than the expansion slots, and even so, Thunderbolt adoption is going slow with definite no signs of picking up speed in the near-future.

Discuss.

#34
14th September 2012
Old 14th September 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enecosse View Post
No tower still means angry people with a bunch of PCIE cards. But all that takes is a Magma style chassis, hooked up via Thunderbolt, during any "transition period".
Problem with Apple is that they throw users into this "transition" crap way too often.
#35
14th September 2012
Old 14th September 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6strings View Post
There are several issues to deal with.

1. Graphics cards. There are no real, working Thunderbolt-solutions for folks using those beefy, dual slot cards for 3D and heavy graphics work. Integrated graphics and smaller on-board solutions may be fine for audio and pro-sumer video, but is Apple really going to drop this segment of power users completely? I don't think so.
I wouldn't bet too much on that. Apple definitely want to keep "most of" the content creators happy (they'd have walked away from desktop systems long ago if that wasn't the case). But there's a real question over how far they'll go to keep the higher end of that market, and where the point comes when they decide they're ok with cutting them loose.

It's been said many times that they're a company with a 90/10 philosophy. They're ok with losing 10% of users if what they do satisfies the 90%. They're not hugely interested in servicing a small niche. That's not their focus. The Mac Pro line has become a small niche market to them. The main part of their company is also invested in bringing the PC form factor to an end. They're a consumer appliance company now (iMac + Macbook = appliances).

Quote:
2. Power users. This is the BIG issue with video professionals (I mean the guys working in TV and film, not the weekend-warrior wedding photographer/videographer). I imagine a lot of GS members would find a decked out Mac Mini or iMac perfectly suitable for their work load, but there is a segment of power users out there working with video who require the power of dual Xeon processors; something you simply can't fit in a portable chassis (including the iMac) due to cooling requirements. Rendering and compressing video is VERY CPU-intensive.

3. Cooling. As many mini and iMac users have attested to, running these machines hard pushes them to their heat tolerances and winds the fans up pretty good. A tower machine like the Mac Pro has plenty of CPU and cooling "headroom" to do heavy lifting without breaking too much of a sweat.
Intel's main focus is on reducing power consumption more than anything else (Because their main competitor is no longer AMD - it's ARM). How viable such future solutions will be is still open to question.

What you're saying is true right now - This is probably part of the reason why it's going to take until into 2013. They're likely to be waiting on some sort of new product from Intel. I doubt very much it's just because they waited for the new generation of Haswell CPU's. Common sense dictates there's more reasons behind such a long delay. What those reasons are have some, particularly higher end users, worried.

Quote:
4. Thunderbolt-only expansion = Spaghetti Desktop! A more minor issue, but I believe expecting professionals to hook up ALL their peripheral drives, devices, interfaces, PCI cards, etc. via Thunderbolt will mean a plethora of cables, power supplies and interconnecting cords cluttering up the desktop like you've never imagined! (never mind your multi-channel interface's audio cables) Hardly a "professional" solution, IMHO.
Apple love accessories. You're not thinking of the profit margins on those cables!

Remember that a future single optical Thunderbolt cable might serve as many things (monitor cable, CPU expansion, storage, and PCIE link etc.) But, yes, you might have to string things to each other more. Whatever they come up with, they've probably thought about that in some way.

Quote:
These are issues Apple will have to consider when designing a new Mac Pro. Although many would love Thunderbolt to take over expansion duties, the reality is that there's more to a pro machine than the expansion slots, and even so, Thunderbolt adoption is going slow with definite no signs of picking up speed in the near-future.
There's always a delay between a new standard and the design and production of things which support it. Then there's the market lag until enough available machines allow device prices to start falling.

You're probably talking another 5 years before Thunderbolt really starts catching on. But I think we'll see much more stuff aimed at pro markets in 2013-2014. If Apple go in that direction then it will only serve to accelerate the process..
#36
14th September 2012
Old 14th September 2012
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raycan View Post
I already have the Mac pro 2013 in the form of a hackintosh for under half the price. Yes, it does benefit from the slick hardware design of apple. But I went for power and cost.

Specs:
4.6ghz over clocked ivy bridge
16 gigs of ram
2-256 gb ssds (one for scratch disk)
2-2 tb sata drives
I gb nvida cuda grafx card

Does not even blink an eye on heavy tools sessions.

I won't rule going back to apple in the future but it'll a lot harder to sell me on one.
Have you done any benchmark tests? I ask because the only tests I have seen show results about the same as 08 or 09 MacPro's. Nowhere near the latest top model. I'm considering a Hackintosh myself...
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#37
14th September 2012
Old 14th September 2012
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enecosse View Post
They're a consumer appliance company now (iMac + Macbook = appliances).
It's all to easy to look at the iPhone/iPad sales numbers and say that, but Apple is not Sony; it has a vested interest in maintaining it's own wall-garden ecosystem, and that includes pro apps and hardware.

Final Cut Pro X proves this (despite groans from certain pros over lack of initial release) and the recent acquisition of Redmatica seems to indicate there is indeed ongoing advancement and development of Logic.

Quote:
I doubt very much it's just because they waited for the new generation of Haswell CPU's. Common sense dictates there's more reasons behind such a long delay. What those reasons are have some, particularly higher end users, worried.
This is curious indeed. Apple needs lead time to design and build a new machine. What are they waiting for? Ivy Bridge Xeons? Why couldn't they have just used the Sandy Bridge ones? Other than that, perhaps they plan on dropping dual-CPU machines and going to i7 chips? Again, hard to imagine Apple dumping pro users who need the big chips.

At some point, you KNOW Apple will drop Intel and transition to their own in-house designed ARM chips, but certainly not in 2013.

Quote:
You're probably talking another 5 years before Thunderbolt really starts catching on.
Right. That's my point. Apple releasing a pared-down pro machine in 2013 which depends solely on Thunderbolt solutions which don't exist or are hard and expensive to aquire would not be ideal.
#38
14th September 2012
Old 14th September 2012
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Originally Posted by 6strings View Post
It's all to easy to look at the iPhone/iPad sales numbers and say that, but Apple is not Sony; it has a vested interest in maintaining it's own wall-garden ecosystem, and that includes pro apps and hardware.
I agree it wants to keep developers and content creators on board. That's not really in question (even though some think it is). The question is whether they think they can do that, to the satisfaction of most, with a product which augments the capabilities of future laptop and iMac products, rather than requiring a dedicated desktop product line. I think they've wanted to get rid of desktops for a while and they see an opportunity.

Quote:
This is curious indeed. Apple needs lead time to design and build a new machine. What are they waiting for? Ivy Bridge Xeons? Why couldn't they have just used the Sandy Bridge ones? Other than that, perhaps they plan on dropping dual-CPU machines and going to i7 chips? Again, hard to imagine Apple dumping pro users who need the big chips.
Well, now we're all guessing. But waiting on an updated Thunderbolt specification, as well as lower power requirements to enable smaller form factors (for high end CPU's) seems to make more sense than most theories. Indeed, it might well be that the new Mac Pro replacement is intended to be a laptop/iMac with 8 or even 16 cores.

Quote:
At some point, you KNOW Apple will drop Intel and transition to their own in-house designed ARM chips, but certainly not in 2013.
I don't know about that. It assumes ARM can maintain its power advantages for one thing. Safe bet for now, but maybe not mid to longer term. But there's definitely some sort of sense to integrating OSX development, and ARM would seem the likeliest for now.

Microsoft's recent (Windows 8) moves will only put further pressure on Apple to go in that direction. Though MS might have to unify around x86, whether they like it or not, if Windows RT fails.

Quote:
Right. That's my point. Apple releasing a pared-down pro machine in 2013 which depends solely on Thunderbolt solutions which don't exist or are hard and expensive to aquire would not be ideal.
Hasn't really stopped them in the past though, has it? They tend to like to try to lead the direction. They ditched floppy drives and moved to USB at a time when you could hardly find mice which supported it, much less other peripherals. I think they see Thunderbolt the same way..
#39
14th September 2012
Old 14th September 2012
  #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raycan View Post
Does not even blink an eye on heavy tools sessions.
I'm guessing you're not using Ozone 5, FG-X, Nebula, Synth Squad, Diva, etc... ?
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#40
15th September 2012
Old 15th September 2012
  #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enecosse View Post
Well, now we're all guessing. But waiting on an updated Thunderbolt specification, as well as lower power requirements to enable smaller form factors (for high end CPU's) seems to make more sense than most theories.
Thunderbolt is not catching on yet because PCs are not utilizing it yet. Manufacturers won't jump on board unless they are certain there's a market. I believe most (outside the video segment) are doing a wait-and-see to see how things pan out between Thunderbolt and USB 3 before committing to TB. And that does not bode well for Apple if it's counting on dropping PCI slots and such.

Quote:
Indeed, it might well be that the new Mac Pro replacement is intended to be a laptop/iMac with 8 or even 16 cores.
I don't agree here. Yes, a decked out iMac or MacBook Pro can certainly be considered "pro", but there's a real market for "head-less" computers, as the continual existence of the mini proves.

At any rate, I think I've taken this (speculation) as far as I can based on current (lack of) info. Perhaps there'll be some substantial new tidbits in January, though with Intel's roadmap for 2013 essentially set in stone, I think a re-designed Mac Pro will mainly be a product of style rather than revolutionary features. We'll see!

PS. On a somewhat related note, after a year-and-a-half, I FINALLY found a use for the Thunderbolt port on my 2011 MacBook Pro!

Apple Thunderbolt to FireWire Adapter - Apple Store (U.S.)
#41
16th September 2012
Old 16th September 2012
  #41
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Originally Posted by 6strings View Post
Thunderbolt is not catching on yet because PCs are not utilizing it yet.
That's largely Apple's fault. They insisted on a 1 year exclusive because they helped on the connector/cable design. But the peripheral world doesn't march to Apples beat in the same way mobile might. It's meant very few devices, and probably much less support than Apple had anticipated.

Intel launched a Thunderbolt chipset for PC manufacturers 4 months ago. But it presently requires an additional chip, along with the chipset, meaning higher costs and likely limiting mass market support until well into next year.

Thinking about it, that will probably cause Intel to delay any deployment of an updated Thunderbolt spec. So, unless a Mac Pro announcement doesn't come until late in 2013, the reason for such a long delay is unlikely to be about Thunderbolt. That still leaves the possibility of a different (non-tower) form factor being enabled by newer CPU's.

Quote:
Manufacturers won't jump on board unless they are certain there's a market. I believe most (outside the video segment) are doing a wait-and-see to see how things pan out between Thunderbolt and USB 3 before committing to TB. And that does not bode well for Apple if it's counting on dropping PCI slots and such.
I still think that's the plan. USB 3 is good enough for many things, but it won't allow the sorts of things Thunderbolt will, and that matters if you're the sort of company who thinks along the lines of having one universal standard for connecting every single thing from a monitor, to a mouse, to a GPU expansion. It also allows those devices to be more easily connected to future mobile and home entertainment devices, rather than being locked inside a PC.

So it's got the philosophical appeal to them, combined with the reality that the bulk of their business has moved away from desktop computing. That, and they need ways to stay connected to desktop peripherals and keep content creators happy. The direction is obvious I think, and I'd be really surprised if a 2013 Mac Pro doesn't signal the start of that move in some way.

Quote:
there's a real market for "head-less" computers, as the continual existence of the mini proves.
I don't disagree, and the new Mac Pro might be exactly that. Just don't expect PCIE support, as standard, would be the main thing I'd say. How many audio users are hooking up a Firewire or USB device to that Mac Pro anyway? Even though PCIE might offer better performance at lower latencies, it's not enough of a difference for them to care. The main thing they're using the Mac Pro for is the CPU power, and to hook up a bigger screen. As long as a replacement offers that then most users will be happy. The highest end users are the ones who will care about PCIE support most, and those are the ones who can best afford an expansion chassis to provide the support they need.
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#42
16th September 2012
Old 16th September 2012
  #42
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That's largely Apple's fault. They insisted on a 1 year exclusive because they helped on the connector/cable design.
That's actually a Thunderbolt "myth." Apple merely got on board early because they had access to the spec before anyone else. Here we are with the two-year anniversary approaching and things are still pretty quiet outside the pro-video community.

Intel: Thunderbolt Is Not Mac-Exclusive | News & Opinion | PCMag.com
#43
16th September 2012
Old 16th September 2012
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Originally Posted by 6strings View Post
That's actually a Thunderbolt "myth." Apple merely got on board early because they had access to the spec before anyone else.
I completely forgot Intel PR had refuted that. Apparently there was no block on 3rd parties coming up with their own solutions. But Intel itself refused to get involved with other OEM's until "early 2012" (which is what came to pass).

"We're not stopping you, but we're not helping anyone but Apple until April of 2012" is hardly a helpful attitude towards the adoption of their own new standard though! And, since Intel wouldn't gain anything by delaying that support, who do you think made that request of them?

So it's not just because "they merely had access to the spec early". They didn't want Intel helping anyone else for a period of time either! That decision has to share some of the blame for the lacklustre support of Thunderbolt up until now..

Quote:
Here we are with the two-year anniversary approaching and things are still pretty quiet outside the pro-video community.
It might take that long to redesign a product, unless you're in a hurry to get something to market quickly. It's no surprise some of the earliest support is products where you get more obvious gains either. But it's hardly a rose-filled picture.

Most audio devices don't really have much to gain, so it'll be interesting to see how they sell them when they do appear, and whether most of the focus is on very low latency performance (Where PCIE is still generally better than either USB or Firewire).
#44
18th October 2012
Old 18th October 2012
  #44
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#45
18th October 2012
Old 18th October 2012
  #45
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I waited and waited and waited and when they didnt release I put together a 6core 3.33ghz 24gb of ram macpro. I will use it until I feel like it isnt holding up and I expect that to be a fairly long time from now and look at the landscape at that point.
#46
21st October 2012
Old 21st October 2012
  #46
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notes in BOLD

-- multiple Thunderbolt ports
- yes, see reply to cpu generation

-- multiple USB 3.0 ports
- only if intel builds USB3 into it's iy bridge-ep or Haswell Xeon chipsets

-- redesigned, slightly smaller case (see next section)
- we can hope, but if it doesn't fit in a rack, a redesign is pointless.

-- Xeon E5 Sandy Bridge processors
- it's possible that Apple will wait for Haswell Xeon chips, which will have an on-die (or native chipset that supports a) thunderbolt controller.

And based on Jon Ive's comments regarding the design of the MacBook Pro Retina, I believe it's also fairly safe to assume the following:

-- loss of Firewire support
- meh (technical answer, i know.)

-- loss of optical drive bays (also allows for smaller, lighter design)
- i can see the removal of the 2nd optical bay, but not the total removal on a workstation class machine. not quite yet.

-- possibly fewer PCI slots due to Thunderbolt replacement "expectations"
- this is dependent on how many PCIe lanes per CPU Haswell Xeon chips support, as well as the bandwidth of the first-generation workstation grade thunderbolt controller. I don't see less than 4 slots, which is already a quite meager amount compared to similarly spec'd workstations.

-- Sandy Bridge Xeon E5 processors. (I highly doubt that given the blowback Apple's received from the pro community that they'll sit and wait to see if Intel can get Ivy Bridge Xeons out-the-door for a timely 2013 release.)

- this could go a few different ways:
1] sandy bridge-ep xeons get released with an on-die thunderbolt controller (or built into chipset.) {not expected, and not considered to be likely}
2] Haswell CPUs, which are generally expected to be the first generation of desktop and server chips to include native thunderbolt support.
3] sandy bridge xeon E5 cpus with no usb3 or thunderbolt. not gonna happen.
#47
21st October 2012
Old 21st October 2012
  #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSt0rm View Post
I waited and waited and waited and when they didnt release I put together a 6core 3.33ghz 24gb of ram macpro. I will use it until I feel like it isnt holding up and I expect that to be a fairly long time from now and look at the landscape at that point.
And probably Apple knows this is becoming too common to need to worry about releasing another Mac Pro that only loses them money compared to their other products. I bet building machines specific to their needs is the direction a lot of professional environments will end up going.
#48
21st October 2012
Old 21st October 2012
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Apple doesn't 'lose money' on the Mac Pro, though yes the degree to which something is profitable might make companies focus on other areas. Apple hasn't given an indication that they're giving up on OSX though, they simply did their usual complete lack of communication along with a lackluster Mac Pro update.

Next Xeons are Ivy, in fact I think Ivy-e basically? To do sandybridge-e (e5) xeons Apple would need to do a fall release. A year after everyone else is a major shift from where they were with the first few Mac Pros (often getting volume before many smaller tier vendors and at extremely good prices), and is going to do nothing but lend credence to them moving away from a professional userbase (regardless of how true or not that really is).

Haswell Xeons are less likely because Intel would have to be really far on the roadmap or have a reason to skip a generation that I haven't seen reported. Maybe I missed it? And a Haswell 'machine' is covered already by iMac, Mac Mini & MBP. Predicting a new form factor is fun but I'll believe it when I see it, there are still several other companies including Intel building EATX sized hardware and so drawing on the existing tooling in the marketplace is way too easy.
#49
21st October 2012
Old 21st October 2012
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Originally Posted by valis View Post
Predicting a new form factor is fun but I'll believe it when I see it, there are still several other companies including Intel building EATX sized hardware and so drawing on the existing tooling in the marketplace is way too easy.
I think that a lot of people predict that Apple will keep the insides generally the same, but take out an optical drive or two so it can fit in a 4 or 5 U rack. It would be fairly easy to do, it just needs a tiny bit less width to make a 4U unit and a few inches off the length to meet 19 inches.
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#50
21st October 2012
Old 21st October 2012
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im pretty satisfied with my 5,1 mac pro 12core 64 gb ram. im in no hurry for them to put out a new mac pro every few weeks.
#51
21st October 2012
Old 21st October 2012
  #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by valis View Post
Predicting a new form factor is fun but I'll believe it when I see it, there are still several other companies including Intel building EATX sized hardware and so drawing on the existing tooling in the marketplace is way too easy.
The thing is, Apple doesn't use the EATX spec to design it's hardware. Mac Pro is a proprietary design spec. The motherboard is split into 2 pieces, with CPU, RAM, and electronically sensitive chipsets on one board, and everything else (PCIe slots, less sensitive controllers) on a second board. The chassis is also proprietary, as is the size of the power supply.
#52
21st October 2012
Old 21st October 2012
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Originally Posted by nickelironsteel View Post
im pretty satisfied with my 5,1 mac pro 12core 64 gb ram. im in no hurry for them to put out a new mac pro every few weeks.
Good for you.
#53
6th December 2012
Old 6th December 2012
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IMO, the 2013 Mac Pro will be built in the United States.
#54
7th December 2012
Old 7th December 2012
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Originally Posted by cinealta View Post
IMO, the 2013 Mac Pro will be built in the United States.
USB 3, Thunderbolt, and this would make me drool. Heck, forget USB 3, as long as it has at least two thunderbolt ports.
#55
7th December 2012
Old 7th December 2012
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Originally Posted by Bunjji View Post
USB 3, Thunderbolt, and this would make me drool. Heck, forget USB 3, as long as it has at least two thunderbolt ports.
Which would make the new mac pro a z87 system opposed to a x79. Either way it doesn't exist. The mac pro name will live, the update next year will be more disappointing than the Mayan Calender coming to an end.

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#56
7th December 2012
Old 7th December 2012
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#57
7th December 2012
Old 7th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cinealta View Post
IMO, the 2013 Mac Pro will be built in the United States.
I don't think so.

1. Tim Cook said "one line" of macs would be built in the US next year. Clearly, this is in response to customer demand, so it will most likely be a popular consumer model, rather than a niche. (Better press coverage).

2. Some iMacs already are bearing "assembled in USA" mark in addition to "Designed in CA". There's your clue.
#58
7th December 2012
Old 7th December 2012
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Yes there are iMacs being produced in the US now but some of the logic behind the Mac Pro being the planned line to move to the US is that the MP is a much smaller line and therefore easier to handle demand; people also feel there is more margin in the MP line than the iMac so Apple loses less profit moving that line to the US.

The iMac is their flagship line and is in higher demand so it makes sense to leave its overseas production in place. Also if Apple is waiting fr the Ivy Bridge Xeons, we will be waiting till Q3, which gives them time to get things setup and bugs worked out
#59
7th December 2012
Old 7th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enecosse View Post
If his lottery numbers are as accurate then I'd like them too please

There's several indicators which point to his speculation being correct. Disagree? Ok. But I doubt there will be any more tower systems. They seem pretty intent on trying to usher in a "post PC era", whatever that means.

What it doesn't mean is that there won't be a multi-core, multi-CPU solution provided by Apple. It just won't be in the form of a traditional tower system. It'll be something which involves Thunderbolt. Part of the delay is likely to be the wait for Intel to deliver the necessary hardware to make it happen, and that won't come until next year.

Less than 2 years from now imagine a very power-efficient 60 core Haswell EX solution using DDR4 ram. Now imagine a relatively small box which can be plugged in to other Apple products, via a cable, and provide the same performance as you would get had you installed those 60 cores on the motherboard.

No tower still means angry people with a bunch of PCIE cards. But all that takes is a Magma style chassis, hooked up via Thunderbolt, during any "transition period".
1. The Mac Pro is not dead, as there is a 2013 model coming.
If this really is a completely new model it could go for at least another 4 years with upgraded processors every year (they probably need to to compensate for initial R&D).

2. Apple has serious cooling problems with their 'compact' designs, which will ultimately probably scare away most pro users. I think Apple will either drop the pro market after the 2013 model or keep making towers for those who need real computing power. Unless of course some cooling miracle comes by.
AFAIK you still need a well designed tower to really cool those 60 cores

All speculation though...
#60
7th December 2012
Old 7th December 2012
  #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by valis View Post
Mac Pros don't use consumer chipsets, neither z87 & x79 support ECC with Xeons among other things. And while it's true that the C202/C206 chipsets don't offer USB3 support, most LGA-2001 Xeon-class motherboard makers & Xeon workstation vendors are offering USB3 on their boards so I see no reason why Apple can't.
True but my statement that a mac pro with thunderbolt would make it a z77/87 still stands. Hopefully intel expands thunderbolt so that it only runs off of the CPU and not the GPU within. If there is a dedicated GPU then it can access it for displays... this would also make it easy to release a pciex8 card with 2 thunderbolt ports minus display support. Then everyone could have thunderbolt possibly, in theory.

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