My "talent" to "pain in the ass" ratio theory
Steverino1984
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#1
6th March 2013
Old 6th March 2013
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My "talent" to "pain in the ass" ratio theory

Has anyone else ever had the experience that more often than not, the difficulty of a client is inversely proportional to the talent?
I swear, it seems that some of the whiniest, high maintenance clients are a bit low in the talent department.
A good, demanding, talented artist? Not a problem…
Maybe I've just had some bad experiences…
Steve
#2
6th March 2013
Old 6th March 2013
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+1. Those with a talent deficiency are insecure, and therefore, a major pain.
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6th March 2013
Old 6th March 2013
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I've found that, as a rule, musicians are crazy and flakey and somewhat disconnected from the real world-- but as long as they concern themselves primarily with the 'other' world, the world where melodies float in on the breeze and the sun is always setting on the bay and bills never come due, things work out pretty good.

It's when they strive to exert their influence on this world, when they try to take an active hand in, say, the recording of their songs, or the editing of their videos, or anything like that, it's obvious they're not playing to their strong suit.

This surely generalizes quite a bit, but for every one who's only moderately disabled, there's another who's in a frenzied duel with their own personal ghosts at the end of their own personal gangplank.
#4
6th March 2013
Old 6th March 2013
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From the perspective of being in a band, I think it's the opposite. I'm a singer/songwriter and have worked with several musicians throughout the years. In my experience, the more talented the musician is, the harder they are to work with. It's like a beautiful woman knowing she's a beautiful woman.
#5
7th March 2013
Old 7th March 2013
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I think its more related to a musicians ego.

Any musician good or bad with an ego has been a terrible experience to work with.

Just as I've had many bad musicians that were a pain, I've had just as many good ones that were a joy to work with, and the opposite. So to me it seems more like an ego thing.

But why are we trying to generalize anyway, we're human. Everyone is different
#6
7th March 2013
Old 7th March 2013
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#7
7th March 2013
Old 7th March 2013
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Quote:
"Studies on the Dunning–Kruger effect tend to focus on American test subjects. A study on some East Asian subjects suggested that something like the opposite of the Dunning–Kruger effect may operate on self-assessment and motivation to improve"

That suggests some sort of cultural bias...like everyone getting a trophy in little league...

I've been finding some people think they'd be able to hang really not being able to and not even understanding that they can't.

This also explains why I'm so convinced that I suck even though people around me seem to think otherwise. Truthfully, I still suck.
#8
8th March 2013
Old 8th March 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dano69 View Post
+1. Those with a talent deficiency are insecure, and therefore, a major pain.
Indeed
#9
12th March 2013
Old 12th March 2013
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Agreed, generally.
#10
12th March 2013
Old 12th March 2013
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I worked concert sound for a college. The major acts were great and we had no problems with them. The musicians on the way up or on the way down from successful careers were the ones that were the biggest PITA types. The people on top usually were pleasant and knew how to smile and get along with everyone. Maybe that is what got them to the top of their profession. In the studio the ones with the most talent are usually, IMHO, the easiest to work with and know when to keep quiet and when to work hard.

FWIW and YMMV
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12th March 2013
Old 12th March 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson View Post
This surely generalizes quite a bit, but for every one who's only moderately disabled, there's another who's in a frenzied duel with their own personal ghosts at the end of their own personal gangplank.
Ha! Great stuff


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#12
12th March 2013
Old 12th March 2013
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Takes all kinds for sure. I've found that a smile and really listen to people gets you a long way.
#13
15th March 2013
Old 15th March 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson View Post
I've found that, as a rule, musicians are crazy and flakey and somewhat disconnected from the real world-- but as long as they concern themselves primarily with the 'other' world, the world where melodies float in on the breeze and the sun is always setting on the bay and bills never come due, things work out pretty good.

It's when they strive to exert their influence on this world, when they try to take an active hand in, say, the recording of their songs, or the editing of their videos, or anything like that, it's obvious they're not playing to their strong suit.

This surely generalizes quite a bit, but for every one who's only moderately disabled, there's another who's in a frenzied duel with their own personal ghosts at the end of their own personal gangplank.
I used to play keyboards in Personal Gangplank.



-0.9
#14
15th March 2013
Old 15th March 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
I worked concert sound for a college. The major acts were great and we had no problems with them. The musicians on the way up or on the way down from successful careers were the ones that were the biggest PITA types. The people on top usually were pleasant and knew how to smile and get along with everyone. Maybe that is what got them to the top of their profession. In the studio the ones with the most talent are usually, IMHO, the easiest to work with and know when to keep quiet and when to work hard.

FWIW and YMMV
precisely my experience too.
I think it's partly driven by the fact that those who are at the top and those working with them have nothing to prove to anyone and are there to get the job done so we can all go have a nice lunch, dinner or whatever.
#15
16th March 2013
Old 16th March 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Omicron_9 View Post
I used to play keyboards in Personal Gangplank.



-0.9
So, you must have witnessed firsthand all the guys dueling with their phantoms!
#16
16th March 2013
Old 16th March 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Omicron_9 View Post
I used to play keyboards in Personal Gangplank.



-0.9
.

I used to be conceited, but now I'm perfect.

Back on topic, I've had all kinds of mixed experiences.

To be honest, I think some of the most talented people are the most personally ****ed up.

But I've also had WONDERFUL creative, live, project and studio experiences with AMAZINGLY talented people.

I don't know if there are any rules. People are people.

YMMV.

.
#17
18th March 2013
Old 18th March 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson View Post
So, you must have witnessed firsthand all the guys dueling with their phantoms!

#18
19th March 2013
Old 19th March 2013
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My "day job" is producing festivals and events ... at one time I was a touring lighting director for major artists.

Back in the 90s, I toured for twelve weeks with a world renown jazz artist, and found him to be the most difficult individual I've ever had to deal with. The music was great, the band was awesome, and cool, the principal was a complete arrogant ass.

Conversely, I have often found myself on a stage with a young no-name, little talent, opening act, and found them to be completely ignorant to the fact, no one knew who they were, and even less cared ... but, we were still standing there arguing about the green M&Ms in the dressing room.

I don't think it's about talent ... it's about attitude. Some of the most talented and famous people I have ever worked with, were the easiest to get along with ... some, not so much.
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