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satisfaction2009
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#1
7th May 2013
Old 7th May 2013
  #1
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Student Interview emergency

got a report due in 2 days. my 2 other interviewees bailed - desperately need two studio pros to answer these Qs ASAP. Any takers???? Please?

feel free to pick and choose, or answer all if you’d like - PM me if you don't want to post here:

What's your name?

How long have you been working in your industry?

What role do you play at your studio?

What might a typical work day be like for you?

How would you describe the company culture?

What do you like best and least about your career?

What qualifications are required for employment at a recording/engineering/mastering studio?

How many roles are there at your studio, and what do they consist of task-wise?

What type of additional training does a new employee receive?

Is the work structured, or are employees self-paced?

What personal qualities would you consider ideal in a job candidate?

How much travel is required for employees?

How often are performance reviews given and what do they evaluate?

What is the typical career path for a new employee within the company?

Anyone?!?!
#2
10th May 2013
Old 10th May 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by satisfaction2009 View Post
What is the typical career path for a new employee within the company?
Give up now and work on something worth fighting for.
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#3
11th May 2013
Old 11th May 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tc_live View Post
Give up now and work on something worth fighting for.
You know, I got the same answer when asking the same questions of established NY Metro area radio disk jockeys. And you know what, it only makes me want to pursue a radio gig all the more!

So what's something "worth fighting for" - becoming a staff accountant Dilbert-head in a sea of cubicles at XYZ Corp???

To Satisfaction2009: Follow your heart, pursue becoming that studio engineer you've always dreamed of being, regardless of what the establishment, afraid of fresh competition, tells you!
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#4
12th May 2013
Old 12th May 2013
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_K_Man View Post
You know, I got the same answer when asking the same questions of established NY Metro area radio disk jockeys. And you know what, it only makes me want to pursue a radio gig all the more!

So what's something "worth fighting for" - becoming a staff accountant Dilbert-head in a sea of cubicles at XYZ Corp???

To Satisfaction2009: Follow your heart, pursue becoming that studio engineer you've always dreamed of being, regardless of what the establishment, afraid of fresh competition, tells you!
the guys at NY are right you might as well not even try unless your going to try to be the next ryan seacrest. All jobs in radio are getting weeded out. Dj's that once played for one station are now forced to play their stuff on syndicates for about 5 stations or more and for the same amount of pay. That means that what 5 or 10 people used to do, one person does now. Its about or tougher than an audio engineering gig. I used to Dj for the radio about 10 years ago.
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#5
12th May 2013
Old 12th May 2013
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Originally Posted by Chaellus View Post
the guys at NY are right you might as well not even try unless your going to try to be the next ryan seacrest. All jobs in radio are getting weeded out. Dj's that once played for one station are now forced to play their stuff on syndicates for about 5 stations or more and for the same amount of pay. That means that what 5 or 10 people used to do, one person does now. Its about or tougher than an audio engineering gig. I used to Dj for the radio about 10 years ago.
I know about syndication. You're right. Many of the on-airs on WABC are heard on dozens of AMs and FMs around the country.

But to just tell some one to go be a computer programmer or financial analyst, however lucrative they may be, when that's not in their hearts, well, that's kind of a put-off, you know?
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#6
12th May 2013
Old 12th May 2013
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_K_Man View Post
I know about syndication. You're right. Many of the on-airs on WABC are heard on dozens of AMs and FMs around the country.

But to just tell some one to go be a computer programmer or financial analyst, however lucrative they may be, when that's not in their hearts, well, that's kind of a put-off, you know?
if it means that much to you then go for it..but if you have bills to pay people to provide for it doesn't sound so inviting. I did radio for fun and because I got a foot in the door. My real passion is mixing and thats what I do but even that is very tough as well. I guess you can say is that being such industry will make you as tough as nails mentally and physically, however it isn't glamourous like most want it to be. Tread lightly.
#7
12th May 2013
Old 12th May 2013
  #7
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Since the others won't take you seriously, I will.

Quote:
Originally Posted by satisfaction2009 View Post
What's your name?
Stephen.


Quote:
How long have you been working in your industry?
12 years or so.


Quote:
What role do you play at your studio?
Which one? I have a home studio where I do everything and I work at a larger studio where I do sausage factory button pushing for mixing video.


Quote:
What might a typical work day be like for you?
That depends on the day.


Quote:
How would you describe the company culture?
At the big studio, humorous, but there's little knowledge of the actual processes that must take place from clients.

At the home studio, it depends on the client.


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What do you like best and least about your career?
Interesting projects and people that make me think of new ways to handles things are what I like the most. What I like the least is the politics and the "business" end of it.


Quote:
What qualifications are required for employment at a recording/engineering/mastering studio?
None. Having "qualifications" means you're too expensive to hire.


Quote:
How many roles are there at your studio, and what do they consist of task-wise?
At the home studio, one. I do everything for myself. Sometimes, I'll hire an assistant for a few hours on a bigger project to help get set. Almost all studios are run by the owner, who can't afford any kind of staff. It used to be that they all had a manager, secretary, runner, engineer and assistant engineer. Then there'd be a producer who's either freelance or owned by the record company. The biggest studios in my area have two people, the owner and the guy that pushes buttons. Really, the old model of the big studio is pretty much gone.


Quote:
What type of additional training does a new employee receive?
None, you need to know everything already to get hired, if it's the type of studio that needs more than one person.


Quote:
Is the work structured, or are employees self-paced?
It's very structured. You have to meet deadlines for clients. Sometimes you get a job today that needs to be done today but that can't interfere with other work you already have going. Sometimes you get handed a box of tapes and a "some time next month". You have to prioritize to make sure all jobs get done on time and with satisfactory quality.


Quote:
What personal qualities would you consider ideal in a job candidate?
Somebody who knows music and is a quick learner, but humble. Anybody can learn to push buttons, but the best engineers seem to be people that understand music and musical instruments across many genres. On the other hand, some people aren't willing to take direction because they think they're the best and those people are useless in a client-oriented business.


Quote:
How much travel is required for employees?
Very little. I'll do a job on location or in a 3rd party studio once and a while but the bulk of my work is at the home base. Clients come to me from long distances sometimes because they're hiring me and my studio.


Quote:
How often are performance reviews given and what do they evaluate?
What are they? If you do good work, you get more clients. If you don't do good work, you don't have a job.


Quote:
What is the typical career path for a new employee within the company?
You realize that you will never get a raise because competition is too fierce, so you try to make your own studio better to supplement your income, which means even smaller margins for the bigger studios.


Quote:
Anyone?!?!
Yes.
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#8
13th May 2013
Old 13th May 2013
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaellus View Post
if it means that much to you then go for it..but if you have bills to pay people to provide for it doesn't sound so inviting. I did radio for fun and because I got a foot in the door. My real passion is mixing and thats what I do but even that is very tough as well. I guess you can say is that being such industry will make you as tough as nails mentally and physically, however it isn't glamourous like most want it to be. Tread lightly.
It seems that any aspect of audio is a challenge to get into, not just broadcasting. Even more impressive than a project portfolio or knowledge of all the major DAW software is "who you know".

With no contacts of that sort it's kind of hard to get near even the studio's toilets, let alone their DAWs or other equipment. It's all politics.
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#9
13th May 2013
Old 13th May 2013
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_K_Man View Post
It seems that any aspect of audio is a challenge to get into, not just broadcasting. Even more impressive than a project portfolio or knowledge of all the major DAW software is "who you know".

With no contacts of that sort it's kind of hard to get near even the studio's toilets, let alone their DAWs or other equipment. It's all politics.
Yes I was fortunate enough to learn under the tutelage of some legendary Sound Engineers. Knowing people and connecting with others helps alot but if the drive is not there to be competitive with yourself or with mixing in general than it will weed you out.


there is no qualification to be an engineer just a certain professional work ethic and a good track record of mixing which takes years of trail and error. You also have to learn how to engage the client. If you dont you will if you spend enough time mixing. To be in the industry you really have to want it and even then its not enough. If you manage to stick it out you should congratulate yourself on being persistent and true.
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#10
13th May 2013
Old 13th May 2013
  #10
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Folks: I must be the most hated member of Gearslutz. lol

Viewed via mobile, I see more thumbs down after every comment I make than after anyone else on here.

Seriously, I would really like to hear the feelings of whoever hates me and what I post, so we can get down to what's wrong. I believe in dialog over confrontation, so before you hit the thumb down, take an extra minute and PM me with your feelings.

I will not be replying to individual PMs, because I want to read a concensus of why people are thumbing me down this way.

In short: Talk to me. PM me. Let me read your feelings. I'm not an evil person.
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#11
13th May 2013
Old 13th May 2013
  #11
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k man, it's real simple, people thumbs down your posts because you go on and on about the same subject in every post on every thread. you do so in a shrill, humorless tone. you write as if you consider yourself an expert on making records, but when asked for a single example of your work you go suddenly mute. you seem oblivious to the fact that you are posting in a forum populated by actual professional mastering engineers.

this is not the way to win friends and influence people.
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#12
13th May 2013
Old 13th May 2013
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_K_Man View Post
You know, I got the same answer when asking the same questions of established NY Metro area radio disk jockeys. And you know what, it only makes me want to pursue a radio gig all the more!
Unfortunately that's what all the kids do.

It's only once they've spent their life savings and wasted 3 years chasing the impossible that they realise what they were told was right.

So I just keep saying it hoping that there's strength in numbers and one day somebody might listen.

Quote:
So what's something "worth fighting for" - becoming a staff accountant Dilbert-head in a sea of cubicles at XYZ Corp???
No, but thinking that music production is the only career that you could ever enjoy is narrow minded and stupid.

The construction industry is booming. Could it be that you like music production because you like making something, using technical skills, and seeing your work complete? Then perhaps you'd work well as a carpenter. Or do you like playing with all the electronics? You might do well as an HVAC engineer.

When I left school I thought working in a studio was all I wanted to do. I've since learnt that there are much more useable skills that interest me, and I'm working very successfully in live events. The same cells in my brain are being stimulated, I'm just stimulating them in an attainable job with a sustainable wage. Something that can't be said for the vast majority of entry level positions in music production, and many above-entry level positions to boot.

You could always train in construction, electronics, marketing, or whatever... get some skills in the trade itself, and return to the studio business in 20 years to build / wire / market studios. We treat life as short but it isn't really, there's plenty of time to do what you want to do, not doing it tomorrow doesn't mean you'll never do it.
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