Login / Register
 
Professional Audio Mastering Service - $5
Closed
Subscribe
#61
19th March 2013
Old 19th March 2013
  #61
Gear maniac
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Posts: 274

Herc is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone View Post
Talk to me in 40 years when you've everything you work for your whole life gets stripped away.

...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
When I started into business 18 years ago

FWIW and YMMV
Gents, I don't mean to raise your ire, BUT.....

When I started "in this business" (also over 35 years ago) a small operation had no chance of even affording decent equipment, let alone running a business from it.

I have worked so many dirty, crappy and dangerous jobs for the last 45 years to support my family, fund my audio education and build my own little studio without any delusion of being commercially viable - I'm sure I'm not alone - so to have an implication that your "cheap / free" competitors are living off "mommy and daddy" is a bit of a smack in the face.

Business is business - same as it ever was - free enterprise means competing with all comers - same as it ever was. The only thing that has changed is the cost of equipment - and thank any deity that the young musicians / engineers of today can get a copy of Reaper / Garageband / whatever and use it to record / learn etc - and if they can get into the business that way then the time has changed again - same as it ever was.

What are "we" going to do when the turd polisher button really exists in the various DAWs? Song recorded, press the "master" button with a 1980s flavour" please - bingo - "mastered for iTunes". Each year the "home studio" quality is getting better - would you constrain them to just having a cheap reel to reel (like I / we started with?)..... hopefully not.

Welcome to the Jurassic gents - the new predators are small and furry - the dinosaurs' future has already been written. If you can't stand the climate change then get another job - you gents have lived the dream for years (i.e. working in what you love) - do I envy you for that compared to what I had to do for work? Probably - do I resent you for it? Not at all.

Turn the page.
4
#62
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #62
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Lawton, OK
Posts: 564

Synonym Music is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herc View Post
Gents, I don't mean to raise your ire, BUT.....

When I started "in this business" (also over 35 years ago) a small operation had no chance of even affording decent equipment, let alone running a business from it.

I have worked so many dirty, crappy and dangerous jobs for the last 45 years to support my family, fund my audio education and build my own little studio without any delusion of being commercially viable - I'm sure I'm not alone - so to have an implication that your "cheap / free" competitors are living off "mommy and daddy" is a bit of a smack in the face.

Business is business - same as it ever was - free enterprise means competing with all comers - same as it ever was. The only thing that has changed is the cost of equipment - and thank any deity that the young musicians / engineers of today can get a copy of Reaper / Garageband / whatever and use it to record / learn etc - and if they can get into the business that way then the time has changed again - same as it ever was.

What are "we" going to do when the turd polisher button really exists in the various DAWs? Song recorded, press the "master" button with a 1980s flavour" please - bingo - "mastered for iTunes". Each year the "home studio" quality is getting better - would you constrain them to just having a cheap reel to reel (like I / we started with?)..... hopefully not.

Welcome to the Jurassic gents - the new predators are small and furry - the dinosaurs' future has already been written. If you can't stand the climate change then get another job - you gents have lived the dream for years (i.e. working in what you love) - do I envy you for that compared to what I had to do for work? Probably - do I resent you for it? Not at all.

Turn the page.
Lamentable as the death of this business is, it's the change in attitude which really kills off audio professionals.

It's not that we don't need cobbled stone roads anymore - it's that everyone thinks they can lay down asphalt with no experience necessary. I find business much easier to navigate and yet far fewer people ever try their hand at it. Get to audio though and, oh, we're just a bunch of knob twiddlers. None of your rhetoric comes close to easing this heartache. It's a sad state of affairs, people are depressed over it, what's the big surprise? Let them grieve where necessary.
1
#63
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #63
mymixisbetterthanyours!
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: Salzburg / Berlin
Posts: 2,435

kosmokrator is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramil View Post
I face with this problem every single day. Paying clients for mixing usually asks me to do mastering as well. And all the time I offer them one of our GS respectable members mastering services. But 95% of clients refuse to pay such a steep price according to them so they end up paying for someone else somewhat 20 euros for mastering which end result I dont like at all. As I work for really low rate (50 pounds for mix) but put a lot of effort and time on mixing it pisses me off that somewhat wannabe mastering engineer kills all my created dynamics in the mix as well as overall balance.. So lately what I been doing is to refuse work for low paying clients. Instead, if someone approaches me for work I start to ask for 600 pounds per song/project (depends) which includes recording costs (one session), mixing and mastering. But what I do I split that 600 quid for dedicated engineers. 100 for recording engineer, 50 for assistant, 200 mixing, 70 quid for mastering engineer. Rest of money is for studio costs etc.. or my team. So for every process I get decent engineer to do that for fair rate. The outcome is that I rarely get clients wanting to pay 600 quid but it doesn't make me work almost for free and my spare time can be used for doing other gigs or crafting my skills on stuff I like to do. Plus people stop wasting your time asking to do something for free to them. Slowly but steadily I get better paid gigs than those working for 5iver ...
As you charge about 1/8th to 1/10th of what I do for mixing, I don't really see much of a difference to the situation between the mastering places charging 60$ and the ones charging 5$ for a song.
__________________
www.just-mix-it.com
#64
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #64
Lives for gear
 
Laurend's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: France
Posts: 657

Laurend is offline
Tata motors and Rolls Royce are both car makers. They just address different markets.
1
Thomas W. Bethe
Verified Member
#65
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #65
Lives for gear
 
Thomas W. Bethe's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Oberlin, Ohio
Posts: 4,909

Verified Member
Thomas W. Bethe is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurend View Post
Tata motors and Rolls Royce are both car makers. They just address different markets.
Behringer and SSL are two audio manufactures that address different markets..so???

The $5 mastering places are not worrisome. It is the guy down the street who was doing tracking, mixing and has just added mastering (although he knows nothing about it). Or the person sitting in his basement who is using cracked plugins with computer speakers for monitors and charging his clients good money are the people that are worrisome.

Some of these amateur mastering engineers are taking good money for messing up someones tracks. The real problem is that these same people, who are really not mastering engineers, are giving the mastering profession a bad name since the artist they have screwed equates what what these amateurs have done with real mastering and may decide the next time to forgo mastering all together or do it themselves.

Not a pretty picture.

I had a long time client who decided that I was too expensive. He went to a $20 per hour "mastering engineer" who really did not know the first thing about what he was doing except that he made everything super loud and distorted (1000 + overs in a 4 minute piece). He also almost doubled the amount that I would have charged the client because he spent hours doing "custom fades" and just plain wasting time. Yes he was cheaper but I would have charged the client $400 and he charged the client over $800. This has been repeated numerous times over the years. My client, in the above example, came back to me begging me to "fix" what the other engineer had done. I could not do what he wanted since the stuff was so badly mastered but I started over again and did a proper mastering job but I did if for a good client at a more than reasonable rate.

This is why real mastering engineers get upset...

FWIW and YMMV
__________________
-TOM-

Thomas W. Bethel
Managing Director
Acoustik Musik, Ltd.
Room with a View Productions
Oberlin, OH 44074
www.acoustikmusik.com

Doing what you love is freedom.
Loving what you do is happiness.

Celebrating 19 years in the mastering business in 2014
#66
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #66
Lives for gear
 
Laurend's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: France
Posts: 657

Laurend is offline
IMHO, the real issue is that DAW developers systematically propose mastering tools in their software. The marketing power they have tends to convince people that mastering is just a plug-in affair with no dedicated knowledge nor acoustic environment involved in the equation.
Why paying for a service which is supposed to be included in the software you own?
__________________
Laurent Sevestre
www.maximalsound.com
Online Mastering
Technical Stuff
#67
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #67
mymixisbetterthanyours!
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: Salzburg / Berlin
Posts: 2,435

kosmokrator is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
Behringer and SSL are two audio manufactures that address different markets..so???

The $5 mastering places are not worrisome. It is the guy down the street who was doing tracking, mixing and has just added mastering (although he knows nothing about it). Or the person sitting in his basement who is using cracked plugins with computer speakers for monitors and charging his clients good money are the people that are worrisome.

Some of these amateur mastering engineers are taking good money for messing up someones tracks. The real problem is that these same people, who are really not mastering engineers, are giving the mastering profession a bad name since the artist they have screwed equates what what these amateurs have done with real mastering and may decide the next time to forgo mastering all together or do it themselves.

Not a pretty picture.

I had a long time client who decided that I was too expensive. He went to a $20 per hour "mastering engineer" who really did not know the first thing about what he was doing except that he made everything super loud and distorted (1000 + overs in a 4 minute piece). He also almost doubled the amount that I would have charged the client because he spent hours doing "custom fades" and just plain wasting time. Yes he was cheaper but I would have charged the client $400 and he charged the client over $800. This has been repeated numerous times over the years. My client, in the above example, came back to me begging me to "fix" what the other engineer had done. I could not do what he wanted since the stuff was so badly mastered but I started over again and did a proper mastering job but I did if for a good client at a more than reasonable rate.

This is why real mastering engineers get upset...

FWIW and YMMV
I know what you are talking about, but in some points I don't agree at all.

Fist, you said that you're offering mastering, post production audio, video restauration and filming.
So what should a person JUST doing anything of the above think about you? That you have no idea what you're doing?

There are mixing engineers who know exactly what they're doing in mastering.
I f.e. learned mastering by being a mastering assistant at an inhouse-mastering studio of Universal Music. My monitoring system and tools are probably better than what the majority on this mastering forum use.

I also happen to be mixing professionally. On the same level. Client- and equipment-wise.

And I'm doing post production mixing, mostly as a freelancer in bigger TV companies.

I take pride in being educated and truly professional in all three areas.
I have the client list to back that up.

This is not to brag or anything, but I seriously get offended that it's the mixing guys who have no idea what they're doing and are destroying the mastering business.

This might be true in some cases. In others, not. For every mixing guy messing up a track in 'mastering', there is one mastering guy messing it up in mastering.

Been there, done that.
1
#68
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #68
3 + infractions, forum membership suspended.
 
Joined: Dec 2010
Location: Portland
Posts: 282

Fabmaster is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurend View Post
Tata motors and Rolls Royce are both car makers. They just address different markets.
Ah, the car analogy.
Thomas W. Bethe
Verified Member
#69
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #69
Lives for gear
 
Thomas W. Bethe's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Oberlin, Ohio
Posts: 4,909

Verified Member
Thomas W. Bethe is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurend View Post
IMHO, the real issue is that DAW developers systematically propose mastering tools in their software. The marketing power they have tends to convince people that mastering is just a plug-in affair with no dedicated knowledge nor acoustic environment involved in the equation.
Why paying for a service which is supposed to be included in the software you own?
I see your point but...

Just because your car has a speedometer that goes to 160 mph or higher does not mean that the average driver or the car is safe at that speed without a lot of training and somewhere "safe" to drive the car.

FWIW and YMMV
#70
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #70
3 + infractions, forum membership suspended.
 
Joined: Dec 2010
Location: Portland
Posts: 282

Fabmaster is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
I see your point but...

Just because your car has a speedometer that goes to 160 mph or higher does not mean that the average driver or the car is safe at that speed without a lot of training and somewhere "safe" to drive the car.

FWIW and YMMV
Ah, another car analogy.
Chef, barber, plumber.............................................................
Red Mastering
Verified Member
#71
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #71
Lives for gear
 
Red Mastering's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: london/UK
Posts: 1,991

Verified Member
Red Mastering is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
Behringer and SSL are two audio manufactures that address different markets..so???

The $5 mastering places are not worrisome. It is the guy down the street who was doing tracking, mixing and has just added mastering (although he knows nothing about it). Or the person sitting in his basement who is using cracked plugins with computer speakers for monitors and charging his clients good money are the people that are worrisome.

Some of these amateur mastering engineers are taking good money for messing up someones tracks. The real problem is that these same people, who are really not mastering engineers, are giving the mastering profession a bad name since the artist they have screwed equates what what these amateurs have done with real mastering and may decide the next time to forgo mastering all together or do it themselves.

Not a pretty picture.

I had a long time client who decided that I was too expensive. He went to a $20 per hour "mastering engineer" who really did not know the first thing about what he was doing except that he made everything super loud and distorted (1000 + overs in a 4 minute piece). He also almost doubled the amount that I would have charged the client because he spent hours doing "custom fades" and just plain wasting time. Yes he was cheaper but I would have charged the client $400 and he charged the client over $800. This has been repeated numerous times over the years. My client, in the above example, came back to me begging me to "fix" what the other engineer had done. I could not do what he wanted since the stuff was so badly mastered but I started over again and did a proper mastering job but I did if for a good client at a more than reasonable rate.

This is why real mastering engineers get upset...

FWIW and YMMV
agree with you Thomas on some points, but I disagree on outcome,
if people were not happy first time, they will try to find a serious professional in my opinion, when searching for mastering engineer,
that would be logical thinking,
but going backwards and trying to do it themselves ??
it's like getting help from healer first time, to avoid expensive doctor, and then when it didn't work
trying diy next time..
but I don't understand completely logic of your client who payed double price,
wasn't he able to conclude costs and quality when ordering mastering to unknown engineer ?

well even if he couldn't, shouldn't this example be a lesson for him for future ?
getting back to you with head down, and very probably letting know anyone in his musicianship net how bad experience and good lesson it was ?
__________________
online mastering studio , Professional audio mastering services Mastering Studio London

Audio X
#72
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #72
Audio X
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by kosmokrator View Post
I seriously get offended that it's the mixing guys who have no idea what they're doing and are destroying the mastering business.
I didn't see where anybody said that?

On a professional level,...generally, I think any respected ME would hold any decent mixer in high regard. Why wouldn't they? It's a symbiotic relationship.

If it's on an inexperienced bedroom bottom feeder level. Who cares...
#73
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #73
Gear Head
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Posts: 41

kieros is offline
Off-topic.

I paid (500$) for professional (well respected) mastering engineer for

a) neutral 3rd party ears
b) for the experience
then
c) the equipment he/she uses
d) to raise the overall level, with proper tools/monitoring/etc.

I did not pay for
a) making things sound like 80's
b) to sound professional
c) making things just loud

I couldn't be more happier.
#74
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #74
Gear addict
 
NotchontheRocks's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 493

NotchontheRocks is online now
Let's talk specifics for a change. THIS is a threat to professional mastering:

http://downloads.izotope.com/guides/...gWithOzone.pdf

It presents an extremely vague definition of what mastering is and leads people to believe that mastering is a series of processes (or processors) rather than an entirely different stage of audio production. Just buy Ozone and you can start mastering your tracks!

As far as I'm concerned, the mix engineer can export a stereo mix, open it in Wavelab, use mastering plugins, run it through an analog mastering EQ, compress, limit, and bounce, and I STILL consider it mixing. The most important elements of mastering are the monitoring chain, the room, and a pair of fresh ears. The mix engineer does not have all three.

And just to clear things up, I'm not saying mix engineers cannot also be mastering engineers. You can offer both services as long as they are separate. If you mix a project, you cannot master it.

You mix until the track is at its best - how the hell can you possibly change anything after that?
4
huejahfink
Verified Member
#75
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #75
Lives for gear
 
huejahfink's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: underneath the dank, cobbled streets of Landon Taaaan'
Posts: 1,968

Verified Member
huejahfink is offline
The way I see it, the rise of the 'digital download' as the primary format for music consumption is what has totally changed the playing field.

For decades, a professional facility was literally a necessity - and the Mastering Engineer was a gatekeeper to production.

Now, in an age where a distributor only needs a 16/44 wav file and a small amount of metadata - literally anyone with a computer and free/low cost software can create a master for distribution. I'm not saying this to belittle the role of the professional facility - far from it.
But unless you are talking about cutting a record, the barriers to creating a production master are gone. Whether it's a GOOD master or not is a matter of opinion.

You can blame companies such as Izotope, Waves or IK for it if you wish, or point fingers at those who choose to do it themselves or offer it as part of a larger package of engineering services. Instead, I applaud them. As a mastering engineer one has to find ways to assert their worth in this marketplace, because in terms of download releases, they are not the gatekeepers to production any more.
__________________
Discogs Technical Credits
Thomas W. Bethe
Verified Member
#76
21st March 2013
Old 21st March 2013
  #76
Lives for gear
 
Thomas W. Bethe's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Oberlin, Ohio
Posts: 4,909

Verified Member
Thomas W. Bethe is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by kosmokrator View Post
I know what you are talking about, but in some points I don't agree at all.

Fist, you said that you're offering mastering, post production audio, video restauration and filming.
So what should a person JUST doing anything of the above think about you? That you have no idea what you're doing?

There are mixing engineers who know exactly what they're doing in mastering.
I f.e. learned mastering by being a mastering assistant at an inhouse-mastering studio of Universal Music. My monitoring system and tools are probably better than what the majority on this mastering forum use.

I also happen to be mixing professionally. On the same level. Client- and equipment-wise.

And I'm doing post production mixing, mostly as a freelancer in bigger TV companies.

I take pride in being educated and truly professional in all three areas.
I have the client list to back that up.

This is not to brag or anything, but I seriously get offended that it's the mixing guys who have no idea what they're doing and are destroying the mastering business.

This might be true in some cases. In others, not. For every mixing guy messing up a track in 'mastering', there is one mastering guy messing it up in mastering.

Been there, done that.
First off I have a college degree in RTV so I know what I am doing. Secondly I have been a professional audio engineer for a good long time so I know what I am doing when it comes to restoration and on location recording. I don't provide services that I know nothing about and I don't charge people for services that I am not qualified to offer.

I get your point but I also know there are a lot of people (like some mixers and wannabee "mastering" engineers) who are doing "mastering". They have NO EXPERIENCE and NO IDEA of WHAT THEY ARE DOING and maybe they own Ozone or some other all in one mastering device/software they think that makes them a "mastering" engineer. Unfortunately they don't have thousands of dollars invested in their room, their monitoring chain and they do not have the ears to do pro level mastering. They are deluding themselves and their clients. These are the people who are doing a lot of harm not only to their client's materials but giving the whole mastering profession a black eye IMHO.

There are some really good mixers who could do mastering but most of the pro mixers that I know realize that another set of ears and a different room with mastering grade equipment can make a BIG difference in the sound so they send their stuff out for mastering.

The idea that one person can do it all is great but there are very few individuals that can do it all. If you are one of them congratulations.

Best of luck in doing your own mastering and I am sure you try and do the best job you can.

FWIW and YMMV
2
#77
23rd March 2013
Old 23rd March 2013
  #77
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Lawton, OK
Posts: 564

Synonym Music is offline
I can't agree more with most in here about having another set of ears. I'd almost pay for that alone.

Where I find the most push back is in clients who want me to do mastering and see using a professional in this regard as optional. I can sort of see the (flawed) reasoning behind this, as the mix is simply going to matter more (and the recording and performance more than the mix as well) - but no one should be putting things out there without some consideration for proper production. Mastering isn't even terribly expensive compared to the rest of the costs, yet it's one of the first things which gets cut.

So I only half agree that it's mix engineers simply stealing business. We get asked by the client to scissor you guys out of the equation shockingly often, too, to the point that they leave disappointed if we can't offer it. These offers come from people who should know better, who have recorded multiple times and have multiple products.

And that's disappointing. Expectations have gotten sky high and quality control has dropped to unheard of levels.... But everybody needs more work.
2
#78
31st March 2013
Old 31st March 2013
  #78
Lives for gear
 
B-San's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 508

B-San is offline
^ great post
Ben F
Verified Member
#79
31st March 2013
Old 31st March 2013
  #79
Lives for gear
 
Ben F's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3,182

Verified Member
Ben F is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by huejahfink View Post
The way I see it, the rise of the 'digital download' as the primary format for music consumption is what has totally changed the playing field.

For decades, a professional facility was literally a necessity - and the Mastering Engineer was a gatekeeper to production.

Now, in an age where a distributor only needs a 16/44 wav file and a small amount of metadata - literally anyone with a computer and free/low cost software can create a master for distribution. I'm not saying this to belittle the role of the professional facility - far from it.
But unless you are talking about cutting a record, the barriers to creating a production master are gone. Whether it's a GOOD master or not is a matter of opinion.

You can blame companies such as Izotope, Waves or IK for it if you wish, or point fingers at those who choose to do it themselves or offer it as part of a larger package of engineering services. Instead, I applaud them. As a mastering engineer one has to find ways to assert their worth in this marketplace, because in terms of download releases, they are not the gatekeepers to production any more.
For decades there was also a lot of money in the music industry. That's all changed so most labels and artists want to cut costs, so the idea of a 'mastering software' package becomes more attractive than forking out the cash for an ME. One day there probably will be a 'Ted Jenson' preset that does the job ok, along with an endorsement by Bob Katz.

However bigger record labels and big name producers still understand the importance of mastering, and everyone appears to be busy enough.
__________________
Studios 301
1
Ben F
Verified Member
#80
31st March 2013
Old 31st March 2013
  #80
Lives for gear
 
Ben F's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3,182

Verified Member
Ben F is offline
Double post...seems to happen if I edit a post on my iPhone app.
1
#81
19th July 2013
Old 19th July 2013
  #81
Lives for gear
 
guitarboy94's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,799

guitarboy94 is offline
Budget price does not always equal poor quality. Case in point, there's a studio mastering my new record right now and they only charge 20 bucks a song. The results I've heard so far are pretty superb. The tracks sound commercial quality and hold up well. Sure, budget studios are probably not spending hours on each song and they've created some shortcuts in their workflow to hit that price-point. I'm sure the mastering engineers with eagle ears can spot the flaws, but the general public can't. And as long as the client likes the finished results, then who cares? It's not fair to state that budget mastering=doesn't know what they're doing. ANd for the record, Izotope 5, when used correctly, is pretty darned terrific!
__________________
Visit my website for free music:
www.patrickskelton.com

Audiobook for my suspense novel, THE DEVICE. 4-Stars!

http://www.amazon.com/The-Device/dp/...s=kurt+feldner

Music Sample:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQSESRzhkkw
#82
19th July 2013
Old 19th July 2013
  #82
Lives for gear
 
jackbraglia's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: NYC

jackbraglia is offline
I thought this shit was closed by now
Music 1
#83
19th July 2013
Old 19th July 2013
  #83
Music 1
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by guitarboy94 View Post
budget studios are probably not spending hours on each song and they've created some shortcuts in their workflow to hit that price-point. I'm sure the mastering engineers with eagle ears can spot the flaws, but the general public can't. And as long as the client likes the finished results, then who cares?
No one. Really.

If your music's main audience is for friends and family and a hobby, and you're not expecting the best or if mediocre seems like it would be good enough then it's no biggy..have fun. On the other hand if your music pays your bills, is your career, life, or just something you wouldn't want full of compromises ,..then it might be worth putting the extra effort in, where you wouldn't go.. I know it could have been better.. but who cares?... ...btw your web site isn't working.
#84
19th July 2013
Old 19th July 2013
  #84
Gear maniac
 
Highphi's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 191

Highphi is online now
Just some quick points on the state of things...

- 911 signaled the end of the industry with the release of the ipod

- internet access allows music consumers to free access to any music

- consumers expectations are lowered by the nature mp3 media

- digital revolution allows musicians to make music at home, hence the DIY ethos and the rise of the prosumer recording technology sector

- 7billion humans unrestricted musical output saturates the market

- there is no market because 7 billion people can download music for their ipod listening pleasure for free (really for the $50/month access to the internet)

- the global economy is broken, America enters a depression with the 2006-08 subprime mortgage collapse and bank bailouts

- more competition for (the diminishing) disposable income thrown at entertainment

- did I mention music consumers have gotten use to free access to music?

- there is no "tipping etiquette" when it comes to music consumption

- print media and the film industry are hurting as well... however the music industry is definitely at the bleeding edge if you ask me!

Like I said, some quick points. I think you guys can read between the lines. Good luck to anyone making a living from this anymore!
__________________
"Linear magnetic media fanatic..."
Closed Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook  Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter  Submit Thread to LinkedIn LinkedIn  Submit Thread to Google+ Google+ 
 
Topic:
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
Bob Boyd / Mastering forum
0
Led / So much gear, so little time!
0

Forum Jump

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.