Low Pass Filters use?
Old 19th March 2006
  #1
Gear maniac
 

Thread Starter
Low Pass Filters use?

First of all, allow me to thank the Gearslutz.com team for making this forum!

I would love to know:
- The use of low pass filters in mastering.
- The preferences of the dearest mastering engineers, who are members of this great forum.
- How often do you take the decision to use a low pass filter.
- When you use one, how low? I know it is not productive to talk in terms of "presets", I am not asking for this. Just asking for some practical examples.

I really hope you will find this an interesting topic to discuss.
Old 20th March 2006
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Edit - oops - you said mastering. I can't imagine many mixes having extreme unwanted high end that might require low passing over shelving. But i'm not a mastering guy so i'll shup up and wait for an expert to answer.
Old 20th March 2006
  #3
Mastering
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rodhmos
First of all, allow me to thank the Gearslutz.com team for making this forum!

I would love to know:
- The use of low pass filters in mastering.
- The preferences of the dearest mastering engineers, who are members of this great forum.
- How often do you take the decision to use a low pass filter.
- When you use one, how low? I know it is not productive to talk in terms of "presets", I am not asking for this. Just asking for some practical examples.

I really hope you will find this an interesting topic to discuss.
I'm trying to remember the last time I used a low pass filter. It's pretty rare in mastering unless you are looking for a special effect, e.g. "on the radio" or "coming out of a cassette speaker". Much more common is high frequency attenuation, shelving cut, or a bell filter doing a specific frequency or frequency range cut.

BK
Old 20th March 2006
  #4
Gear maniac
 

Thread Starter
Oh my god.
I almost spilled coffee all over the keyboard.
Bob Katz replied to my question.

This is one of the reasons I love this forum: industry professionals actually take active part and take time to discuss things with everyone else, be it a home studio producer e.t.c.

Dear sir,

thank you for making the Mastering Audio book available to us all. It is a sounce of knowledge and insiration.
And thank you for sharing your experience here.
Old 20th March 2006
  #5
Gear addict
 

I agree.
thanks bob katz!
Old 20th March 2006
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Cellotron's Avatar
 

Verified Member
When I was cuting vinyl masters to "competitive DJ levels" from digital sources an LPF was more than often completely necessary as the high end people would put on their mixes would have led to distortion when played backed at the level I was cutting (around +4 to +6dBVu). 16kHz was a common center points for the filter for me - although I can remember a few sides I cut with the LPF set as low as 14kHz because the mix was sent in with so much "ice pick in the ear lobe" ultra-high end on it. Usually a small boost with a wide Q in the upper mids would nicely compensate for the filter - and quite often I think the rolled off ultra highs actually made for a more pleasant listening experience. Again - if the mix came in dark or if it was an LP side cut to conservative levels I could get away without using an LPF - but for the typical hip-hop or house side I was cutting from digital source as hot as possible without distortion then the LPF (and often a de-esser and acceleration limiter on too) was pretty necessary (and was good insurance against damaging the cutting head too). The filters I was using at Europadisk for vinyl cutting were via the Neumann HT75, Neve DTC, and sometimes the JMS Audioware Hi-res EQ.

For CD mastering I'll use an LPF on a rare occasion when the mix is harsh and overly bright in places where an eq bell cut or shelf cut, or multiband comp on the high end, doesn't sound as good as simply using the filter (or possibly using it in conjunction with this other methods if the material warrants it). The filters on my Amek Medici are pretty nice - if I use them I usually set them somewhere between 19-23kHz so that the roll off is actually pretty gentle.

Again - it's definitely a rare case when I'll use an LPF on a CD master - but there was indeed a track I mastered yesterday that I used one on. Anyway - to me you should not use one unless you absolutely "have" to - it certainly isn't a "go to" tool.

Best regards,
Steve Berson
Old 21st March 2006
  #7
Gear maniac
 

agreed,
shelving at the top end (or a very wide bell) much more than an actual filter though i do use them when what im working on is going to vinyl. these are always 12" and so by doing this i have much more control over how they are going to sound when cut. as above this is usually around 16k or a bit above
Old 24th April 2011
  #8
Gear interested
 

Hi

Hi everyone,

this is my first reply, I´m new, so thanks to everyone for your pacience :D
My impression when I listen to some "professionally mastered" recordings, specially from England (I don´t want to say specific names), is that they try to make the sound a little bit dark or mellow, so I can´t suspect that they roll-off the high end frequencies around 15 - 16 KHz with a low pass filter maybe with a 18 dB/oct slope. Maybe I am wrong but honestly that´s my perception. What do you think about it?? thanks for your time!


Cheers!
Old 24th April 2011
  #9
Lives for gear
 
IIIrd's Avatar
 

Verified Member
I use them when cutting all the time, usually a 15kHz LPF, I don't know what the slop on a TG is ...6 or 12dB / oct...not vicious..i'm only guessing really...they do work though and thats good enough for me. 15 on a LP and 12kHz on a 7" . It may sound brutal but it's giving playback systems the best chance of reproducing the audio cleanly from the inner groove.
From a safety point of view, you don't want allot of high level content in at those frequencies as the cutter tends to get quite hot...hence the term...a hot cut (so I am told), .
Old 24th April 2011
  #10
Lives for gear
 

Verified Member
I've never used one in a master for digital release ever. That air stuff is really rare in home to medium sized studios, as lots of cheaper pre-amps and converters just arn't hearing it, I'm usually trying to tease some out with my Sontec style high shelf, or I'm carefully preserving what's there!
Old 24th April 2011
  #11
Gear addict
 

I use one 15-20% of the time. A nice gentle slope LPF can gently warm up some mixes.
Old 26th April 2011
  #12
Gear maniac
 
mastermat's Avatar
 

depends totally on the source material...there might be tracks where it is absolutely necesarry, and some recordings may benefit from it.
But of course the changes to the audio using low cut filters are big and it can also can destroy the sound of a track....another thing: you really have to have a proper monitor system to decide if a low cut sounds good or bad on a track!!!
on some not so good systems a low cut would sound nice just because the low end isn´t represented well! most times it is safer to use shelf filters instead....also experiment with different settings....avoid steep curves....
Old 26th April 2011
  #13
Lives for gear
 
Waltz Mastering's Avatar
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by mastermat View Post
you really have to have a proper monitor system to decide if a low cut sounds good or bad on a track!!!
On some not so good systems a low cut would sound nice just because the low end isn´t represented well! Most times it is safer to use shelf filters instead....also experiment with different settings....avoid steep curves....
lcf ≠ lpf
Old 27th April 2011
  #14
Gear maniac
 
mastermat's Avatar
 

shame on me.....should read the post more carefully...of course lpf is no lo cut!
Old 16th May 2011
  #15
Gear Head
 
gtzack4's Avatar
high/low cut

I generally roll off about 30hz and cut nothing in the top end from the mix. I solo the low end and cut some where between 35 and 50hz (usually). but when it comes to the top end I'm not sure what to do. I find everything above 17khz annoying and often Ill cut all the way down to 15.5khz.

How do you guys go about cutting the low and high ends of a mix?
Old 17th May 2011
  #16
Lives for gear
 
wado1942's Avatar
 

If I need to cut the extremities, I usually use a band filter or shelf. Like if somebody used a PZM on the hihat, I can tune it to 14Khz or whatever in a narrow bell and cut it that way. If there's too much high end in general, it's usually a shelf.

I can finally say that I've used an LPF on a project! The source was a cassette with no appreciable information above 7KHz or so, just noise. So I dialed a 2nd order LPF down to 8KHz. Took the edge of the cassette tape, copied from a cassette, copied from vinyl hiss nicely. But no, that's not anywhere close to a mastering project for release, just to make it listenable enough to transcribe.
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
Audio_Vault / So much gear, so little time!
3
Unknown soldier / So much gear, so little time!
0
AdAudioInc / So much gear, so little time!
5
jbuntz / Geekslutz forum
1

Forum Jump
 
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.