What DIY designs stand up to the big boys?
#31
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #31
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elambo's Avatar
 

Seventh Circle Audio is on par with the big boys without a doubt.
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#32
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #32
I just dived into the DIY world and I'm already hooked. I successfully built a pair of CAPI VP28s without any problems, yet my previous soldering skills consisted of soldering cables mostly. I highly agree with the statement above about the DIY world bringing classic circuits to those who can't normally afford the real deal.

I'm looking forward to making a pair of each of the following (a guy gotta have a pair of everything):

CAPI LC53
Hairball 1176 rev A
RecProAudio Pultec EQP1A
Drip LA-2A

I believe if you can source the right parts for each build, you can easily match or out-perform the originals. I know that all the Drip builds require you to source all the parts yourself, so I've mentally prepared myself for that task, but I wonder how involved should I get with sourcing the original parts for the 1176s, or should I stick with the parts that Hairball Audio supplies?
#33
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #33
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studiostuff's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by .:On The Rock:. View Post
I wonder how involved should I get with sourcing the original parts for the 1176s, or should I stick with the parts that Hairball Audio supplies?
I'd say it depends on how vulnerable you are to taunts of "Cheater!" or "Paint by number builder!!".

I DIY because of the price benefit first... and the quality is on a par with, usually better, than the more expensive stuff. But I've gotten some heat from friends who think DIY kits are less authentic than designing and building something new to the universe.

What could be faster, easier than clicking on the Hairball enclosure check-out, you can buy your MNATS PCB on the same page, and use his BOM to order from Mouser. FIVE days later, plus a few hours and a few drinks... BAM... 1176 magic at your disposal.

I'm on my second 1176 from Hairball. Easy doesn't describe how easy it is to build one. Stuff works great. Quiet as a mouse. Sounds great. I'm OK with being a cheater!!

My next project will be a P2P LA-2A. Just to see how hard it is. I'd probably rather be working on a 51x rack kit and a couple of VP28s, except I need to find someone to order it all for me under a nom de guerre after all the recent unpleasantness so I don't get a carefully packed turd in the box.
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#34
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #34
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monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by studiostuff View Post
What could be faster, easier than clicking on the Hairball enclosure check-out, you can buy your MNATS PCB on the same page, and use his BOM to order from Mouser. FIVE days later, plus a few hours and a few drinks... BAM... 1176 magic at your disposal.

I'm on my second 1176 from Hairball. Easy doesn't describe how easy it is to build one. Stuff works great. Quiet as a mouse. Sounds great. I'm OK with being a cheater!!
that's great! I should save a few bucks for that!

I also can't wait to do a point to point LA2A and Redd 47, maybe more. I love building on tagboard.
#35
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #35
Gear maniac
 
Moatl's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by .:On The Rock:. View Post
I wonder how involved should I get with sourcing the original parts for the 1176s, or should I stick with the parts that Hairball Audio supplies?
Well if you're still new to DIY - you could build one 1176 with the BOM from Hairball.com...safe route.
...I did so at the beginning when I did my first Rev A (a while back). Shortly after I started to dig deeper - learned more about the parts of the original.
e.g. the BOM includes metal-film resistors because they have relatively little tolerance while still being pretty cheap but in the original Rev A (as well as in the original Rev D) they used carbon comp resistors.
So I read all across the web and carbon comps were claimed to sound warmer (due to 2nd harmonics being generated by the saturation of the carbon comps), not as clean as metal-film but are also noisier, have more tolerance and some values are pretty hard to get nowadays.
Well I found them...
Then I ran different instrument and vocal samples through my "metal film" Rev A and recorded it.
After that I swapped all the metal film resistors in the signal path for carbon comps and again ran the samples through it and recorded it.

And even though both versions definitely have that 1176 character sound when comparing the recorded tracks - the latter had even more of what I love about an 1176...I'd say more MOJO

Anyway with the next Rev A's I built I used carbon comps again but this time for stereo use I matched almost all the parts...now this is another thing about DIY that I love - how many studios in the world have two MATCHED vintage "Blue Stripe" Rev A's

The same goes for my LA2As, my Pultecs and so on - tried different resistors, different caps, sourced the original ones etc...
Well it IS addictive but there's nothing like switching on your first self-build LA2A and it sounds f***ing amazing!! Like wooooohooooaaaahhh!

Large up the entire DIY community out there!!
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#36
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #36
Lives for gear
 

I'm not really sure that it's the right mindset to be in when starting DIY. If you just start doing it because you want it to be authentic and paradoxically non-original then I don't know if you would feel much like completing it. You have to primarily have a love of building things and doing DIY projects in the first place. These things (even the simpler projects) take many, many hours, and it's fiddly work. Very slight things that you do in the build can (and does) alter the sound a lot, two of the same that you build probably wouldn't even sound the same!

Someone else mentioned that parts nowadays are available with far more stringent tolerances. This is very true, 1% for most parts, compared to 5% on some of the original designs. They should also last longer and perform better.

DIY is really something you have to love, just getting cool gear out of it is a ridiciulous amount of hard work for the money saving on some projects!
#37
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #37
Village Idiot
 
Labs's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moatl View Post
So I read all across the web and carbon comps were claimed to sound warmer (due to 2nd harmonics being generated by the saturation of the carbon comps),
Carbon resistors are noisier.
Carbon resistors can drift a lot depending on temperature.

I have built a few small circuits to listen for any difference, but to me, nothing stood out - did not check temperature drift. I suspect that the build up in noise might be quite noticable in a circuit like the 1176, which uses quite a few resistors.

Even though you perceive it as mojo, I would advice to use Metal film.

And for the 1176 type, I have the latest G1176 V/k in the shop.

Also, I don't think these guys were mentioned in this thread.

expataudio
[silent:arts] DLA2A Opto Compressor

Oh, and another great thing about DIY is, you can design your gear to look exactly how you want.

[IMG]pcbgrinder.com/image/cache/data/Produktbilleder/8-500x500.gif[/IMG]

Back to the soldering iron

Gustav
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#38
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #38
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Chaellus's Avatar
Drip
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#39
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #39
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therock's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kiopo View Post
DIY is really something you have to love, just getting cool gear out of it is a ridiciulous amount of hard work for the money saving on some projects!
DIY is very absorbing. Especially if you are not an EE or really experienced in electronics theory per se. The good thing is all the cool gear we yearn to build is very basic from an electronics perspective.

I often ask EEs I work with about discrete opamps and transformers and they laugh at me. They don't get the "vibe" thing at all. they all say the same thing. "Why would you use that?" There are much better devices today. And then they ramble off some IC part # and then I can get a laugh. They design ALUs and RAM so audio electronics to them is a joke on the EE scale.

This one guy I work with is like 70 years old and he designed opamps to do binary math and for computers years ago in the 50s or 60s. He claims that opamp design is very very complex. I showed him the 2520 schematic and he tried to explain it to me but I didn't get it. He actually said it was "very impressive" when he looked at the whole 312 circuit. He said it is text book and no big deal these days but for 1960s it was "savvy" and "clever" as he put it. But he still didn't understand why I would want to use one and he was telling me there are "ICs out there that do the same thing a lot better and smaller". He didn't get the distortion thing with transformers either. Why do you want distortion he asked? funny different people's perspective.


But the negative thing about DIY is again the time you put in to it. It takes away from the the point of gear in the first place, and that is to make music with it and produce songs.
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#40
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #40
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moatl View Post
So I read all across the web and carbon comps were claimed to sound warmer (due to 2nd harmonics being generated by the saturation of the carbon comps)
The non-linearities are so slight that the even order harmonics will only show up when you have very high voltage changing across them, so as plate resistor on a triode where they'll be changing from 50V to 200V or so. But this is dwarfed by the non-linearity of the triode, so it's probably pretty pointless and just adds noise.

Low level noise, however, can seem pleasant to the ear.

But they do look pretty, and are sturdy for PtoP work.
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#41
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #41
Gear maniac
 
Moatl's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Labs View Post
Carbon resistors are noisier.
Carbon resistors can drift a lot depending on temperature.

I have built a few small circuits to listen for any difference, but to me, nothing stood out - did not check temperature drift. I suspect that the build up in noise might be quite noticable in a circuit like the 1176, which uses quite a few resistors.

Even though you perceive it as mojo, I would advice to use Metal film.
Hey Gustav!

I think I'll need a couple of GSSL bus comp pcbs soon

Also a friend built the Bo-Hansen DI and he is speaking very highly of it!

Regarding the carbon comps - they are a little noisier but not as much as I thought - by a long shot. Actually I'm surprised how low the noise floor of my Rev A's is!
Not comparable to the original Rev D I had here for a couple of days - which was noisier (Ok let's talk again when my clone is 40 years old haha!)

And then again, if I want a clean, extra-low-noise comp I'd probably not go the 1176 route anyway - especially not the Rev A
And - I forgot to mention in the metering and GR-control amp circuits I still use metal film because they have less tolerance - best of both worlds for me thanks to DIY!

@ the rock: you're maybe right in terms of time consumption if one is not experienced - so as a DIY newbie you might have to consider this!
Also when working on tube stuff, you're working with high voltage and it can easily kill you if you're not careful and don't know what you're doing!!

However if you built something like e.g. the 1176 once, twice or more often you get some routine - so it takes you less then a day assumed you have all the parts you need. With some projects like the Drip EQP-1A or even more the GPultec you can easily build it in one afternoon - and its fun, too

Some other projects are more time consuming - like the SA3A (Dual LA3A) from Serpent Audio - this box is packed! But it's definitely worth it! Especially with all the mod switches accessible from the front-panel!
But I just read Serpent is not offering the SA3A kit anymore...bummer!

Anyway many great links have been shared here already but as I mentioned before you find almost all of them and a lot more on www.groupdiy.com
Check it out!
#42
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #42
Village Idiot
 
Labs's Avatar
 

I was curious about the time consumption aspect - and also the "Can an idiot do it" aspect, so when a friend of mine asked me to "come intern" for a few weeks (He wanted to get out of attending a job application course), I asked him to build a GssL and document it.

It always depends on what your billable hours are worth, how many hours you are actually billing, if you want to calculate the opportunity cost - but this is a real world example of the time and effort factors.

Electrocutedfriend

Gustav
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#43
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #43
Lives for gear
 

D.I.Y. Recording Equipment | DIY Microphones, Preamps, Compressors, etc. huge invintory of diy projects.

and to be honest none of this stuff is rock science no magical components I've never been disappointed in any diy project I've done.

I've built capi vp 25,26,28 doing a pair of vp 312's this weekend.

hairball 1176
telefunkin 492 eq
tube pre
u87 clone

and bang for the buck I've moded nearly ever piece of outboard in my studio.

you cant go wrong with diy.
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#44
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #44
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by therock View Post
DIY is very absorbing. Especially if you are not an EE or really experienced in electronics theory per se. The good thing is all the cool gear we yearn to build is very basic from an electronics perspective.
True. But it is a dying art, electronic engineering courses these days are increasingly focusing on DSP. The old circuit designs may not be complicated by such standards, but they are brilliantly thought out and how they have stood the test of time in the industry is really testament to that.

Simpler designs where you can troubleshoot the circuit yourself have a huge appeal to me. I have no problem with IC filters on synthesisers in sound-terms, but it's really hard to service it yourself. It's the same with computers, modern motherboards are so hard to troubleshoot that it's exceptionally rare that anybody does anything except replace the whole board!

I didn't do an EE course, wish I had, but I am pretty absorbed by building audio gear now. I'd say it's 50/50 building them for a love of DIY and to get a cool piece of gear, for me. There's something special about having a rack full of gear you made yourself and is unique. I don't really feel that it gets in the way of the music because it's the audio engineering side of things that I've always been into, and I think they go hand in hand!

(having said that, I haven't worked in my studio all week because there have been bits of DIY compressors everywhere )
#45
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #45
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Paul Gold's Avatar
Complicated is not a synonym for good. Nor is simple a synonym for bad.
#46
15th August 2013
Old 15th August 2013
  #46
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Piedpiper's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by therock View Post
He didn't get the distortion thing with transformers either. Why do you want distortion he asked? funny different people's perspective.
indeed... whereas it has become fashionable to actively pursue distortion, and I'm not necessarily knocking that, there are plenty who choose very carefully where they admit any distortion, and mostly choose to minimize it. just playing devil's advocate...

...or IOW, distorted is not a synonym for good sounding.
#47
23rd August 2013
Old 23rd August 2013
  #47
Gear nut
 
Enchilada's Avatar
 

I've been DIY-ing for a few years now and have learnt a few things along the way.

First thing I've found, etching my own PCBs leads to a finished product that is noisier. I've found that buying PCBs has yielded a better result. Particularly with mics and preamps. The're not necessarily too noisy to be very usable, but definitely noisier. That said, I etched the PPC for my GSSL and I'm very happy with the result. For simple mics like a U47 clone, just go do it over air.

If you're not familiar with electronics or great a soldering, try building a guitar pedal, headphone amp or something simple first. You'll learn a lot building your first project. A FET mic isn't a too bad for first project either.

Don't just buy the cheapest parts. Look at what components others are using. A classic rookie mistake is to look at a BOM and realise that you can get caps for 10 times cheaper so you pull the trigger on them. While you're learning it's best to stick with what's tried and true.

As for projects that stand-up. For preamps the Green-Pre is a good staple, as is the SSL 9K. The G1176 and GSSL compressors are great.

I've built more mics than anything else though. With mics, one of the major factors is the capsule used and that's where you really want to shell out. I'm a fan of the capsules over at microphone-parts.com. IMO they'll outshine most cheap mics but they won't floor you.

A lot of people love the Gyraf G7 although I'm not a huge fan of it. I've built 3 of them but I preferred a C12 circuit with my CT12 capsule (if you can afford one of these, buy one!). Strangely I preferred the RK12 over the CT12 with the G7 as mine was quite dark and the C12 tended to cut through the mix better. I'm also not the biggest fan of the AMI U47. One mic I am a huge fan of though is the U47FET over at GroupDIY. For U47 mics you can't go past the Cathedral Pipes Dale Ulan M7 capsule or the Beezneez M7 capsule.

At the end of the day, you get what you pay for. If you use cheap and nasty components you'll likely end up with a cheap and nasty sounding piece of gear. Save money on aesthetic things and spend you money where it counts

Just my $0.02
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#48
11th May 2014
Old 11th May 2014
  #48
Gear addict
 

An older thread... sorry for the bump, but I was reading DIY threads and wanted to chime in. I am staring at a Drip Electronics Opto-6 board right now. All the caps and resistors are soldered in. I have the T4b's from Drip laying around. Next pay check, I get the "expensive" parts.... Mundorf Output capacitor, Sowter transformers, etc. Then the check after that will go towards the case and wiring. It's really fantastic that with DIY you can "pay as you go". I guess nowadays you can do that with Sweetwater or Zzounds, but the difference is that instead of a $3,500 outlay, it's less than a third of that.

I'm debating what I want to do for the case. I could buy a purshua case and just be done with it. I could buy a bare case and do it myself and save a hundred bucks... but the option I'm considering is ordering a fancy veneer wood, staining it, epoxying it, and creating a totally original burl wood face. It'll cost about the same as the premade, pre-drilled, and some folks would probably say it'll look weird, but hey, I like wood, especially quality pieces, and it might be pretty sweet.

Anyway, DIY is fantastic. I have an Orange Squeezer compression pedal that I have built into a Ruby amp that I built myself (still having a few power supply issues with that). I also have a T15 that is laying bare right now, as well as an N72 in a One Shot. After I finish the Opto6, I'll get the full SCA unit and probably build his DI and an B16 module... I'll have that rack filled up before I know it and I fully expect do a second. Of course, as a solo song-writer, I don't need a second rack, but I'll put the modules I like less into it and sell it off probably.

So within a couple of months, I'll have a Neve clone, a clean pre (T15) that totally smokes anything under $300 (I'd say it's ISA One quality), a pair of API clones, a DI for bass, an LA2A clone, and another quality compressor for $2800.

And I have a couple of the mic kits on my radar as well... And hey, why not a Fairchild 670? Really.. why not???

Man, why doesn't everybody do this?
#49
13th May 2014
Old 13th May 2014
  #49
Gear maniac
 
Moatl's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grimace View Post

And I have a couple of the mic kits on my radar as well... And hey, why not a Fairchild 670? Really.. why not???
Because there's a huge difference between simple "paint-by-numbers" kits à la Hairball 1176 & SCA stuff or well documented easy builds like a Drip Opto and extremely complex builds like a e.g. Fairchild 670.

And building a N72 or an EZ1073 and building a Neve 1073 or 1084 true to the original layout is two different worlds...maybe that's why

...I just finished a dual Neve 1084 with step-attenuators - all parts stereo matched and with some extras added to the original circuit. For things like that its mandatory you can read schematics and hand wiring all the concentric switches incl. the step attenuators is no joke!


Not to say the SCA stuff or especially the Drip designs don't sound fantastic if done well - I built a couple of Greg's designs in the past as well - also some Opto 4's. You can learn a lot and get High-End (though not the vintage) sound for relatively little money.

Actually my first DIY project was a Drip Opto - and at that time I also felt like hey - with this great manual and stuff it's pretty easy - why doesn't everybody do this??

(If you look at the Hairball kits - sometimes I get the impression indeed "everybody" does them)
And that's a good thing because I think it's very beneficial to gain some knowledge about how the gear you're using is actually working.

But also with the 1176 there's a difference between buying a kit and sourcing all the original parts and building an exact replica of an original unit.

Apart from that it's easy to follow a build manual - if everything works in the end. But if it doesn't and you don't know what the heck you are doing there and where to start troubleshooting because you always just followed a paint-by-numbers manual - guess what

Anyway I don't want to rain on your parade - DIY is great, but just sayin' putting together a Drip Opto is a piece of cake - a Fairchild 670 is friggin beast dude!

I welcome your motivation - that's always the foundation for learning new things.
Further down the road you might get stuck with more challenging projects - even further down the road you will have solved the problems and that again will open the doors to even more challenging projects

I started off with simple kits some years back - meanwhile I've built LA2As, Pultecs, SSL comps, LA3As, Neve EQs etc...now I have no problems building 1:1 point to point replicas of LA2As or modifying existing layouts to better fit my needs...and I all learned it thanks to DIY and great forums like e.g. GroupDIY

Attached is a pic of the Neve "2-1084" I mentioned above and a true to the original circuit LA2A with vintage UTC HA100-X and A-24 transformers, NOS tubes, etc...and a rack with all DIY gear (except the Space Echo on top of the rack )
Attached Thumbnails
What DIY designs stand up to the big boys?-img_1629.jpg   What DIY designs stand up to the big boys?-img_2168.jpg   What DIY designs stand up to the big boys?-img_2157.jpg   What DIY designs stand up to the big boys?-img_2140.jpg   What DIY designs stand up to the big boys?-img_2176.jpg  

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#50
13th May 2014
Old 13th May 2014
  #50
Gear addict
 

Those units look great. And your wiring job there looks great.

I admit I have a little more background in electronics than most - maybe a half dozen or so electronics courses - And I've been through the troubleshooting thing... where you you are just mindlessly plugging along on a project, you power it up, and then realize, damn... now I actually have to sit here and figure out everything to know where to start.

As for the Fairchild, Drip has a kit for that too.

And yes, I understand that these pcb circuits won't sound identical to the vintage gear, but the vintage gear probably doesn't sound like vintage gear either anymore. And if it did, whose ears would you trust to say so? Some guy in his 60's who can't hear above 10K?

Regardless, a well-crafted, high end circuit design is just that. What is usable is usable. I'd be shocked to ever hear someone suggest that an LA2A done on a pcb isn't good on the same sources that a p2p version is, or that it doesn't have the range of applications, or that it doesn't sound really great (assuming good contruction and quality components). There's differences? Sure. Naturally. But to say they make a difference to anyone who wants nothing more than a fantastic sounding piece of gear that fills a particular niche? I doubt it. Anything beyond that is actually just a form a fetishism. And of course, you can look that up in the DSM-IV.

Same with the Neves vs the clones. If you've got the headroom of a quality pre (so it's usable), and an approximation of the original's signature dynamic response and the subtle eq differences (so it sounds, as people say, "neve-ish" or whatever), do you really think there's any meaningful difference beyond that? It's usable. It lends the desired tonal qualities. Beyond that, nobody, and I mean nobody, cares in the real world. Even professional audio engineers don't care. Not a single one of them hears a clone being used on a song and starts screaming, yelling "Fake! Fake! He used a Fake!!!" See? That never happens. Because nobody cares.
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#51
13th May 2014
Old 13th May 2014
  #51
Lives for gear
 
Vintageidiot's Avatar
 

I am tempted to do a pair of eqp1a's from Drip, for sure. Everything else is in order.....
#52
13th May 2014
Old 13th May 2014
  #52
Gear maniac
 
Moatl's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grimace View Post
Regardless, a well-crafted, high end circuit design is just that. What is usable is usable. I'd be shocked to ever hear someone suggest that an LA2A done on a pcb isn't good on the same sources that a p2p version is, or that it doesn't have the range of applications, or that it doesn't sound really great (assuming good contruction and quality components). There's differences? Sure. Naturally. But to say they make a difference to anyone who wants nothing more than a fantastic sounding piece of gear that fills a particular niche? I doubt it.
That's why I said those DIY projects do sound fantastic if well build and that you can get High-End sound for relatively little money.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Grimace View Post
Anything beyond that is actually just a form a fetishism.
That is probably true


Quote:
Originally Posted by Grimace View Post
Beyond that, nobody, and I mean nobody, cares in the real world. Even professional audio engineers don't care.
This on the other hand is not true at all. A lot of engineers do! Some specifically ask for a certain piece of vintage gear when they book the studio, because they know exactly what to expect and how it sounds and they want exactly this sound. And if this particular piece is not available at the studio you either have to rent it or they might go somewhere else where what they're asking for is available.
And if you tell them "you know I have that EZ1073 - it really has that Neveish sound to it" they go

There's someone over at the GDIY forum that owned a pair of Neve 1073s and 1084s for over ten years - when the studio closed down he had to sell them off.
Now when the EZ1073 became available he figured he could get back that sound...NOT.
He started changing every single component to be as close as possible to his beloved 1073/1084 (he still had recordings he'd done and also freq. response sweeps to compare with) but he wouldn't get back his sound. So he finally bought another Neve 1084 just to get back that particular sound he was missing and went as far as copying the original layout 1:1, etched all the pcbs with the exact same traces as in the original and hand wired it true to the original just to figure out what it was that made the difference.

Anyway what I'm trying to say - of course nobody will listen back to a record saying - "hey you hear that - he used a clone there!" And if you just want some great sounding "Neveish" preamp for your studio - these projects are rad!
But if you have engineers at your studio and they plug in i.e. the Neve EQ because they expect that certain sound and it's not there, it's a deal breaker for sure!

That's actually why I started building stuff for my studio with the original layouts 1:1 and vintage components where applicable (i.e. trannys) - because if somebody is doing a mix here and wants to have the sound of a (well serviced) vintage LA2A - this will sound as close to one as any vintage LA2A would be to another vintage unit.
#53
13th May 2014
Old 13th May 2014
  #53
Lives for gear
 
drtechno's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kiopo View Post
I'm not really sure that it's the right mindset to be in when starting DIY. If you just start doing it because you want it to be authentic and paradoxically non-original then I don't know if you would feel much like completing it. You have to primarily have a love of building things and doing DIY projects in the first place. These things (even the simpler projects) take many, many hours, and it's fiddly work. Very slight things that you do in the build can (and does) alter the sound a lot, two of the same that you build probably wouldn't even sound the same!

Someone else mentioned that parts nowadays are available with far more stringent tolerances. This is very true, 1% for most parts, compared to 5% on some of the original designs. They should also last longer and perform better.

DIY is really something you have to love, just getting cool gear out of it is a ridiciulous amount of hard work for the money saving on some projects!
I diy electronics because its an art for me. And yes my art is expensive when I sell it.

But to quote one of the engineers I admire his work (Rupert Neve) " It is not necessarily the quality of the part that makes the sound. It is how that part works with the other parts, reguardless of thier price.

carbon comps are noisey, yes. but say we use them in a noise nulling circuit like a fully balance line stage, say a vintage BA6A circuit as they can be not so noisey in that circuit and bring a kind of romantic color to vocals.......for example.
#54
13th May 2014
Old 13th May 2014
  #54
Lives for gear
 
emrr's Avatar
I'll DIY a lot of things, but I think if I ever want a Fairchild 670 there's at least one finished production unit out there already I can't beat the price on when combining parts/labor/warranty. The Drip project is abominably expensive for something that doesn't yet work, and every finished build looks like something that would rarely survive shipping.
#55
27th May 2014
Old 27th May 2014
  #55
Gear Head
 
Analogue Nubian's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by .:On The Rock:. View Post
I wonder how involved should I get with sourcing the original parts for the 1176s, or should I stick with the parts that Hairball Audio supplies?
Leave a track of beans or breadcrumbs while venturing into to the dark forrest

I've nearly completed my first ever DIY project (a dual 1073) and sourced close to all the parts. It was very enlightening and has taught me a lot. Ordering Carnhill transformers and contemplating on using a trimmer yes or no, matching transformers and having to decide what parts to use in case of obsolete ones, has given me a lot more control over how I want the box to sound. Yeah, you have to be more patient and It can be frusto at time waiting for a month on a few resistors but especially when you're starting out it's good to 'measure twice, cut once' so to speak.

And with many build threads around help is never far away (the groupdiy forum par example).

Before I started I seriously soldered maybe 10 cables with lumps and burns. I can now safely say that for me, there's nothing cooler than to actually visualize how the signal and current flows through the gear and why it does what it does to make 'that' particular sound it does. Also, my soldering rocks now

I own classics/hi end gear at my studio (daking, api, chandler, manley etc) and believe that thoroughly knowing them makes for your diy project to match up or surpass it. Reading up on design specs and schematics of the classics gives you an idea of what your possibilities are.

I believe it's always about having different flavors at your disposal and with DIY you can actually make it so..
#56
14th June 2014
Old 14th June 2014
  #56
Gear interested
 

DIY rocks! Drip Electronics stuff is absolutely top notch! I've finished my first DIY project EVER and it really boosted up my confidence in this field!
Have a look at this post Vertical Drip Fairchild 670 v2 finished!
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1
#57
14th June 2014
Old 14th June 2014
  #57
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fobee View Post
DIY rocks! Drip Electronics stuff is absolutely top notch! I've finished my first DIY project EVER and it really boosted up my confidence in this field!
Have a look at this post Vertical Drip Fairchild 670 v2 finished!
Gorgeous work... but alas, now the Drip stuff is "unobtainium" as well. That's right. You now have a classic piece of gear, because Drip is out of business. Check their website...
#58
14th June 2014
Old 14th June 2014
  #58
Lives for gear
 
Lamster's Avatar
 

Thought I'd chime in.
Back in the old days before internet, people like Tim Orr published projects in electronics magazines like ETI ( remember that?) some were covered in one issue but some were spread over several issues,
I built a Mixer amp as my backline adapting the circuits from a full on studio mixer project Turned out pretty good and at the time was better than the offerings from H&H carlsbro ect

There are many dIY/projects on the net some good some bad.
Yushynth's site is pretty good ( I think he designed the Minibrute for Arturia )
Stuff from JH ( Jurgan Harrible) was very good but unfortunately he passed away a year or two ago so whilst his designs are still available you cannot get PCBs for his projects
Synth DIY site has lots of resources and links.
These tend to be circuit diagrams and cad drawings for PCBs.

The Kit type projects from various suppliers look good and have the advantage of all parts sourced and supplied but at added cost. But best chance of building working units

Then there is the Clone option this is basically get a service manual and backwards engineer the thing for yourself.

Then the last option is Repair/ modify commercially built equipment This can be cheaper if you buy your donor unit at a good price unfortunately analog synths command a premium price on ebay EVEN THE DEAD ONES so if your not careful you may end up spending more than buying a working one.
I brought a dead mixer for almost nothing the biggest cost was the petrol and the 4hr round trip and to go and collect it in the end the parts count was very small and I spent less than £20 on parts but it took several weeks to iron out all the problems. Its not an expensive desk but I'd have had to spend way more if I tried to build one and no guarantee that the end product would have been better.
#59
14th June 2014
Old 14th June 2014
  #59
Gear maniac
 
Moatl's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grimace View Post
Gorgeous work... but alas, now the Drip stuff is "unobtainium" as well. That's right. You now have a classic piece of gear, because Drip is out of business. Check their website...
Where did you get that from??

The last update on their website is from today and no mention of them going out of business or what so ever...
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1
#60
14th June 2014
Old 14th June 2014
  #60
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moatl View Post
Where did you get that from??

The last update on their website is from today and no mention of them going out of business or what so ever...
Check the Geekslutz forum. "What's the Deal with DRIP"?

Also, note that everything is now under "Legacy Documentation"

The "Message from Drip" on 6/11 said that they are fulfilling all orders, and then stopping production indefinitely. Also, notice that the forum is now down.

I guess they took the notice off their webpage. However, what I quoted in the geekslutz forum was copied and pasted from their website on the night of 6/11.
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