Tracking Acoustic Guitar
JRcruz
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#1
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #1
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Tracking Acoustic Guitar

Hello Slutz! I hope I'm posting it in the right place.
Here's the deal:
I've got a friend who ask me to do a "Folk/Country" demo for him wich consists of Vox,Acoustic Guitar,bass and a little percussion.. The thing is that I've been struggling to get a decent sound out the Acoustic Guitar,I've been playing guitar since I can remember so performance is not the issue here.
I've tried different mic techniques xy,spaced,single mic etc,my room is not stellar but is fairly treated,tried different preamps etc...
Mic's I've used are akg414 xls and B,neumman TLM103,Groove Tubes 66 and also a Michael Jolly blue spark with a U87 mod,SM7 and a couple of SDC beyerdynamics.
The guitar I'm using is a Taylor 314 wich is bright but sounds really great in the room w new strings.
Preamps:LA610,ISA828,UA 710 and some emulations on my saffire56.
I've spent hours with mic positionng,room positioning you name it...
But when it comes to mixing it becomes a nightmare. It sounds nasal,middle rangey,no sparkle!
I'm aware of my limitations as I'm not a pro but been recording for quite some time,mostly rock/pop though.
My question is: Does anyone in this forum have a Good Raw Acoustic Guitar example that I can use for reference as how a "WELL" recorded Acoustic guitar should sound on its own, With no processing or plugins? It'd be great if you guys could include details like mic tech's,positioning etc?
Like I said,the songs are pretty straight forward and simple with very few instruments wich makes it even harder to balance.
Thank you guys in advance.
JRcruz
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#2
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #2
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Anybody?
#3
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #3
Gear interested
 

When I get stuck when recording anything, I find I usually am just plain overshooting everything with my thought process. Dunno if you are like me but I tend to do that searching for a gold nugget haha. I guess if it was me (I have similar quality gear) I would take a few hours and come back to it and see if I like it and sometimes it will show you what it needs anyways in that respect.
#4
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #4
Gear maniac
 

Sound can vary depending on different preferences and a lot will have to do with the room, player, and the individual guitar.

I would direct you to look on youtube for some of soundpure's acoustic guitar videos.
Another thing I'd suggest is find a recording you like of an acoustic guitar and share that here.

Typically when I mic acoustic guitar I like to use a pair of AT4033a mics with Warm Audio WA12 preamps.

I position one mic around the 12th fret and the other mic I put kinda pointing at the floor/body of the guitar kinda over the guitarists strumming shoulder (if that makes any sense) I don't know how else to describe it.

I find that this combination gives me a well represented high end and mid range but also presents the lows in a nicer way than a lot of true SDC mics. I also like the space that panning the stereo pair can provide in a mix.

The 4033 used to be a nashville/bluegrass favorite for miking acoustic instruments. I consider it more of a MDC which I find works well for an acoustic guitar where you can't decide if you want a pencil or a LDC.

But depending on the song/desired tone a ribbon can work (usually I blend it with a condenser), Beyerdynamic M201/M88 combo can work great, even a Shure 57 for certain things. If you are getting that nasally sound sometimes a dynamic can be a great alternative to a condenser to kinda smooth out the tone a bit.

What I'd do in your shoes is experiment with mic placements use your ears to get most of the sound right before you apply any processing. It may be a possibility that this isn't the right instrument for the job, not all acoustics record well in all styles. Which is all the justification one needs to collect guitars.
Quote
1
JRcruz
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#5
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #5
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by jodyandersong View Post
When I get stuck when recording anything, I find I usually am just plain overshooting everything with my thought process. Dunno if you are like me but I tend to do that searching for a gold nugget haha. I guess if it was me (I have similar quality gear) I would take a few hours and come back to it and see if I like it and sometimes it will show you what it needs anyways in that respect.
Hey jodyandersong. I do have that problem as well(not sure if its a vice or virtue) but I recorded the 3rd song out of 8 and the Acoustic GTR sounds like s#$%!lol . Honky and nasal.
I'll be in the studio again monday and will try the ORTF config and the good old dynamic as "indie folk guy" suggested.
Thank you for your input.
JCruz
JRcruz
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#6
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #6
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by indie folk guy View Post
Sound can vary depending on different preferences and a lot will have to do with the room, player, and the individual guitar.

I would direct you to look on youtube for some of soundpure's acoustic guitar videos.
Another thing I'd suggest is find a recording you like of an acoustic guitar and share that here.

Typically when I mic acoustic guitar I like to use a pair of AT4033a mics with Warm Audio WA12 preamps.

I position one mic around the 12th fret and the other mic I put kinda pointing at the floor/body of the guitar kinda over the guitarists strumming shoulder (if that makes any sense) I don't know how else to describe it.

I find that this combination gives me a well represented high end and mid range but also presents the lows in a nicer way than a lot of true SDC mics. I also like the space that panning the stereo pair can provide in a mix.

The 4033 used to be a nashville/bluegrass favorite for miking acoustic instruments. I consider it more of a MDC which I find works well for an acoustic guitar where you can't decide if you want a pencil or a LDC.

But depending on the song/desired tone a ribbon can work (usually I blend it with a condenser), Beyerdynamic M201/M88 combo can work great, even a Shure 57 for certain things. If you are getting that nasally sound sometimes a dynamic can be a great alternative to a condenser to kinda smooth out the tone a bit.

What I'd do in your shoes is experiment with mic placements use your ears to get most of the sound right before you apply any processing. It may be a possibility that this isn't the right instrument for the job, not all acoustics record well in all styles.
Hi there indie folk guy!
Really good tips here. I really apreciate your input. I'm going to try the "over the shoulder" technique as well as the dynamic.
I recorded the same guitar on a rock project awhile ago and it sounded good ,but it was a rock band and it the Acoustic was pretty buried in the mix. I'm aware that the Taylors aren't the best guitar for recording but that's what I have available. The singer in going to bring his Martin for the next session,but I'm pretty sure it all comes down to mic placement.
Thank again.
JCruz
#7
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #7
Gear maniac
 

My problem with most Martins and Taylors is that they don't really offer a balanced tone(keeping in mind all guitars are different and these are rash generalizations based on many guitars sampled)

A lot of Martins are kinda boomy and the mids/highs can get lost
A lot of Taylors are very bright and sometimes you just want to fill out the tone and that low end just isn't there

My weapon of choice/suggestion for an all around acoustic would be some of the following (keeping it simple, obviously this can open a can of worms)
Gibson J45
Epiphone Masterbilt AJ500 (in rosewood or mahogany)
Epiphone Inspired by 1964 Texan

I find that the advanced jumbo/sloped shoulder shape is very comfortable and provides a balanced and versatile tone for strummers and fingerpickers alike. They tend to work in everything I record blues, folk, classic rock, a little country, indie stuff. They are all solid woods to boot so all will improve with age.
JRcruz
Thread Starter
#8
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #8
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by indie folk guy View Post
My problem with most Martins and Taylors is that they don't really offer a balanced tone(keeping in mind all guitars are different and these are rash generalizations based on many guitars sampled)

A lot of Martins are kinda boomy and the mids/highs can get lost
A lot of Taylors are very bright and sometimes you just want to fill out the tone and that low end just isn't there

My weapon of choice/suggestion for an all around acoustic would be some of the following (keeping it simple, obviously this can open a can of worms)
Gibson J45
Epiphone Masterbilt AJ500 (in rosewood or mahogany)
Epiphone Inspired by 1964 Texan

I find that the advanced jumbo/sloped shoulder shape is very comfortable and provides a balanced and versatile tone for strummers and fingerpickers alike. They tend to work in everything I record blues, folk, classic rock, a little country, indie stuff. They are all solid woods to boot so all will improve with age.
Now THIS was helpful! I will check out this guitars. The Epiphone is more on my price range and they're not too hard to find. I also heard tha Santa Cruz guitars are great for recording as well,but price is on the high side as well. I guess that when it comes to acoustic guitars ,price does matter.
Thank you!
#9
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #9
has all the gear he needs
 
Unclenny's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jodyandersong View Post
When I get stuck when recording anything, I find I usually am just plain overshooting everything with my thought process.
I have tried everything from the over the shoulder thing to multiple microphone positions to DI/microphone and I have come full circle to sitting down in front of my best LDC and just playing. When it sounds good in the headphones I hit the red button.

A good clean capture of an acoustic guitar is the key to life.

Of course the right guitar and a player who knows what to do with it is a pretty good start as well.
#10
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #10
Gear maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unclenny View Post
I have tried everything from the over the shoulder thing to multiple microphone positions to DI/microphone and I have come full circle to sitting down in front of my best LDC and just playing. When it sounds good in the headphones I hit the red button.

A good clean capture of an acoustic guitar is the key to life.

Of course the right guitar and a player who knows what to do with it is a pretty good start as well.
that's always a great approach it has me gas'ing for a mojave audio MA200fet though
#11
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #11
Gear maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRcruz View Post
Now THIS was helpful! I will check out this guitars. The Epiphone is more on my price range and they're not too hard to find. I also heard tha Santa Cruz guitars are great for recording as well,but price is on the high side as well. I guess that when it comes to acoustic guitars ,price does matter.
Thank you!
those epiphones are like hidden gems, the masterbilts are really exceptional and require very little to improve them as they come stock with all solid tonewoods and bone nuts/saddles plus Grover tuning keys.

To my ear they have a drier more old school sound that I really like they have a lot of character to them and record well.
#12
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #12
has all the gear he needs
 
Unclenny's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by indie folk guy View Post
that's always a great approach it has me gas'ing for a mojave audio MA200fet though
Yeah.

I have had my Peluso 22 251 tube mic in the very same spot in my room for over a year now. Sit down in front of it, twist a few knobs on the channel strip and when the smile gets big enough start recording.
JRcruz
Thread Starter
#13
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #13
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by indie folk guy View Post
those epiphones are like hidden gems, the masterbilts are really exceptional and require very little to improve them as they come stock with all solid tonewoods and bone nuts/saddles plus Grover tuning keys.

To my ear they have a drier more old school sound that I really like they have a lot of character to them and record well.
Great to know! I'm looking into it. My local shop has a used one in stock I'm going to check it out tomorrow.
JRcruz
Thread Starter
#14
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #14
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unclenny View Post
I have tried everything from the over the shoulder thing to multiple microphone positions to DI/microphone and I have come full circle to sitting down in front of my best LDC and just playing. When it sounds good in the headphones I hit the red button.

A good clean capture of an acoustic guitar is the key to life.

Of course the right guitar and a player who knows what to do with it is a pretty good start as well.
Unclenny, I've been trying one LCD approach as well but not sure if its the guitar or the room(which is not to bad for other applications) but it sounds pretty nasal with flubby low mids and the highs are too sharp(as opposed to smooth). I do have decent mic's and like I said on my original post I've been playing for over 25 yrs so the problem is definately not the player. I'm going to post a snippet of the recording asap. The recording is not horrible but I'm sure I can get a better sound out of it.
Thanks for you input.
JCruz
#15
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #15
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by indie folk guy View Post

A lot of Martins are kinda boomy and the mids/highs can get lost...
The problem is that what you and I hear as players is not what the people in front of us are hearing, the balance is different. I still buy for me and agree with you about Martins, but you still should understand that truth. I have an early 1980s (maybe late 1970s...) Washburn that is most unimpressive to listen to from the players standpoint, not bad, just nothing to write home about. But it records with a very smooth even tone. Pretty cool.

In terms of Taylor, until I moved to Florida I never saw so many Taylors, and I regularly jam with a pile of people who have them. I find the sounds, balance, and tone to be all over the place. I've played plenty of Taylors at trade shows and handled some very wonderful sounding instruments. But when I was looking to buy I found nothing that I wanted in the stores. They are a great success story and definitely have pushed the quality of mainstream acoustics forward, I'll give them that. But beyond that, I'm not so excited. I'd like to have a Big Baby though, just for fun.
#16
28th September 2012
Old 28th September 2012
  #16
has all the gear he needs
 
Unclenny's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRcruz View Post
Unclenny, I've been trying one LCD approach as well but not sure if its the guitar or the room(which is not to bad for other applications) but it sounds pretty nasal with flubby low mids and the highs are too sharp(as opposed to smooth).
I go in through a Trident strip. I get some of those flubby low mids out of there as well as that excess sizzle.

Once in the box that clean mono track goes on a few tracks and gets some judicious delays to spread it out.
#17
29th September 2012
Old 29th September 2012
  #17
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Analok's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRcruz View Post
Great to know! I'm looking into it. My local shop has a used one in stock I'm going to check it out tomorrow.
Just throwing out there that I love my Epi Masterbilt EF500rs! A truly comfortable & responsive set of tonewoods. Almost scary at times what it brings out of me!!
#18
29th September 2012
Old 29th September 2012
  #18
Gear maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Analok View Post
Just throwing out there that I love my Epi Masterbilt EF500rs! A truly comfortable & responsive set of tonewoods. Almost scary at times what it brings out of me!!
when I got my first AJ500r I honestly walked into the guitar shop with $2500 cash to try to wheel a deal on a real nice high end acoustic. I honestly had my heart set on an SJ200 that had been sitting in the shop for ages, my next choice was a J45. I don't know what compelled me that day to try some "cheap" acoustics but I tried probably 70 guitars of varying prices and literally couldn't find a better sounding/playing acoustic than that particular AJ500R.

And I know that I have a tendency to pick instruments from the musician perspective but I also made sure to bring a friend to play the guitar so I could listen from a distance.

It is very important to remember to listen from where the "mics"/audience would be.

And keep in mind I did say those were my generalizations I have played Martins, Taylors, etc that have been well balanced too. Every piece of wood/instrument is different. That's why it's so important to find the one with the right tone and feel for you.

Sometimes the over the shoulder and 12th fret stereo pair can be a great way to capture those guitars that seem to sound better at the guitarist's point of view but again lots of variables to consider.

Mic selection, placement, preamp choice, guitar choice, pick choice, string choice, how you play, how you engineer, etc.
#19
29th September 2012
Old 29th September 2012
  #19
I start with the simple tried and true method of recording acoustic. Since this is for a ensemble start with mono cardioid then maby add a omni room mic.

Take one of the Beyer mc930 (or SDC) and place it 12" away from the 14th fret. IF you cannot get a good sound with this method something is broken or your room sucks. I love the km184 for this, crisp and warm.

I would then add one of your LDC in omni mode at least 36" away from the source. I personally love omni on acoustics. You might like just the omni.

Then I would experiment with both the sounds and see what works the best. I also use a Gobo trap about 2 feet behind the mic's to minimize my room sound.


Good luck
#20
29th September 2012
Old 29th September 2012
  #20
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kerouac's Avatar
Don't overlook a smaller, OM-bodied instrument, especially for fingerpicking. I'm also a fan of using LDCs and giving them a little bit of space. 18-24" out and you can shoot straight for the sound hole and it wouldn't be too boomy.
#21
30th September 2012
Old 30th September 2012
  #21
Lives for gear
 
kafka's Avatar
 

It sounds like the OP has covered all of the basics. There are just so many ways to record flattop. XY is pretty narrow on guitar, but I've found it to be useful. I've also done plenty of recordings with one SDC at the neck joint and another over the shoulder at the lower bout. A single LDC can work great, too, particularly if the guitar needs to be rich but should't occupy a lot of stereo width, like a typical folk arrangement.

As far as the nasality goes, I'd say look at the HF reflections in the room. These tend to be pretty directional, so first work on positioning the player and the mics. After that, some well-placed moving blankets can suppress some of that 4k zone that tends to make guitars sound weak.

Guitar is a lot about the richness of the mids. That's why a single, fairly resonant LDC can work well on it. My two LDCs that I use for that application are a Peluso 2247LE and a Gefell UM70. The Peluso is richer and more resonant. The Gefell is a lot smoother. Both have their uses. The 414 the OP mentioned is a good mic, but it's not particularly resonant in the mids, and so it might not be bringing out the forwardness that he's looking for. Something with a big resonant can of a body might be more useful. I like the Peluso, but there are a ton of other alternatives.

One technique I've had good success with is to mic with a stereo SDC pair, but also have an LDC to bring out the richness of the guitar for fills. If you place your mics carefully and automate the LDC track for those moments where the guitar needs to carry things a bit more, you can have a smooth but wide guitar that's out of the way of the vocals, but can step up when it needs to carry the section forward. If you automate the LDC carefully, nobody will notice you're doing it.
JRcruz
Thread Starter
#22
1st October 2012
Old 1st October 2012
  #22
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by indie folk guy View Post
those epiphones are like hidden gems, the masterbilts are really exceptional and require very little to improve them as they come stock with all solid tonewoods and bone nuts/saddles plus Grover tuning keys.

To my ear they have a drier more old school sound that I really like they have a lot of character to them and record well.
I fount a Epiphone jv-500M on CL this weekend,bought it for $380 in pristine condition. LOVE the sound already! Solid Mahogany is in fact much warmer compared to my Taylor wich has Spruce top and rosewood laminate back/sides. I'll be going to the studio tonight to record it.
The other guitars with this sound that I tested on my local shop were around $2500!
Thank you for your insight,it was really helpfull.
JRcruz
Thread Starter
#23
1st October 2012
Old 1st October 2012
  #23
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by kafka View Post
It sounds like the OP has covered all of the basics. There are just so many ways to record flattop. XY is pretty narrow on guitar, but I've found it to be useful. I've also done plenty of recordings with one SDC at the neck joint and another over the shoulder at the lower bout. A single LDC can work great, too, particularly if the guitar needs to be rich but should't occupy a lot of stereo width, like a typical folk arrangement.

As far as the nasality goes, I'd say look at the HF reflections in the room. These tend to be pretty directional, so first work on positioning the player and the mics. After that, some well-placed moving blankets can suppress some of that 4k zone that tends to make guitars sound weak.

Guitar is a lot about the richness of the mids. That's why a single, fairly resonant LDC can work well on it. My two LDCs that I use for that application are a Peluso 2247LE and a Gefell UM70. The Peluso is richer and more resonant. The Gefell is a lot smoother. Both have their uses. The 414 the OP mentioned is a good mic, but it's not particularly resonant in the mids, and so it might not be bringing out the forwardness that he's looking for. Something with a big resonant can of a body might be more useful. I like the Peluso, but there are a ton of other alternatives.

One technique I've had good success with is to mic with a stereo SDC pair, but also have an LDC to bring out the richness of the guitar for fills. If you place your mics carefully and automate the LDC track for those moments where the guitar needs to carry things a bit more, you can have a smooth but wide guitar that's out of the way of the vocals, but can step up when it needs to carry the section forward. If you automate the LDC carefully, nobody will notice you're doing it.
Hello KFKA!
Thanks for chimming in! I wish I had a Pelluso or a Geffel on my mic locker,the mic's I have available are not mind-blowing but I had luck using them on a number of different applications. This is my first project where the acoustic is the plays a main role and I've been struggling to give it that wide stereo spread/full-sound. The guitar I was using was a Taylor 214,wich is know to being too bright. I came across and bought a Epiphone JV-500M as my friend "indie folk guy" suggested and will try it tonight,it's not an expensive guitar but it sounds like one. Much warmer and balanced than my Taylor wich might help.
I'll be posting the results here soon.
Thanks again.
Peace.
JRcruz
JRcruz
Thread Starter
#24
1st October 2012
Old 1st October 2012
  #24
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by indie folk guy View Post
when I got my first AJ500r I honestly walked into the guitar shop with $2500 cash to try to wheel a deal on a real nice high end acoustic. I honestly had my heart set on an SJ200 that had been sitting in the shop for ages, my next choice was a J45. I don't know what compelled me that day to try some "cheap" acoustics but I tried probably 70 guitars of varying prices and literally couldn't find a better sounding/playing acoustic than that particular AJ500R.

And I know that I have a tendency to pick instruments from the musician perspective but I also made sure to bring a friend to play the guitar so I could listen from a distance.

It is very important to remember to listen from where the "mics"/audience would be.

And keep in mind I did say those were my generalizations I have played Martins, Taylors, etc that have been well balanced too. Every piece of wood/instrument is different. That's why it's so important to find the one with the right tone and feel for you.

Sometimes the over the shoulder and 12th fret stereo pair can be a great way to capture those guitars that seem to sound better at the guitarist's point of view but again lots of variables to consider.

Mic selection, placement, preamp choice, guitar choice, pick choice, string choice, how you play, how you engineer, etc.
In you opinion,wich one sounds "warmer"? Rosewood or Mahogany back and side?
#25
1st October 2012
Old 1st October 2012
  #25
Gear addict
 
kerouac's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRcruz View Post
In you opinion,wich one sounds "warmer"? Rosewood or Mahogany back and side?
Mahogany.
#26
1st October 2012
Old 1st October 2012
  #26
Lives for gear
 
kafka's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRcruz View Post
The guitar I was using was a Taylor 214,wich is know to being too bright. I came across and bought a Epiphone JV-500M as my friend "indie folk guy" suggested and will try it tonight,it's not an expensive guitar but it sounds like one. Much warmer and balanced than my Taylor wich might help
Well, since you brought it up, I make a point of never criticizing anyone's instrument selection unless I've played it myself. However, Taylor's have never been my cup of tea. The necks feel like electric guitars, and they're just too bright for my taste, IMHO. However, this is also only IMHO. A lot of great players have used them and have made great recordings with them. So, there must be some way of doing it.

There are a lot of good Epiphone flattops out there. I just can't advise on models, because I have only played a handful over the years. Some were crap, but others were very nice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRcruz View Post
In you opinion,wich one sounds "warmer"? Rosewood or Mahogany back and side?
Quote:
Originally Posted by kerouac View Post
Mahogany.
+1. Mahogany. Rosewood is richer. I prefer a rosewood guitar for fingerpicking, but for strumming, I find mahogany gels better due to the warmth.
#27
1st October 2012
Old 1st October 2012
  #27
I play a Babbinga back and sides Gibson J-200 and a Gibson CL-20. I've gotten the best sound with a small diaphragm condenser (like an MCA SP-1) placed about a foot away from the 12th fret, aimed toward the sound hole. For me, mid/side is just too much of a hassle and I like to avoid any phasing issues by using just one mic. Compression is also part of my acoustic sound. I now run through a Spectra Sonics 610, the best comp I've found for not only preserving but actually enhancing the high end sparkle.
#28
2nd October 2012
Old 2nd October 2012
  #28
Lives for gear
 
Oldone's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRcruz View Post
my room is not stellar
This is likely your issue. Either record outside or find a bigger room or....did you treat your floor and ceiling?
#29
2nd October 2012
Old 2nd October 2012
  #29
If you have Beyer 930's for SDC I'd try them, try moving them back, like 3 feet or so. You can do XY, lately I do XY with a stereo bar and instead of having one mic by the neck and the other by the bridge, I'll point them so that one is above the guitar pointing down at around the 12 fret, the other mic is below the guitar pointing up. Like in this picture
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Tracking Acoustic Guitar-179406_10150093903919510_3734229_n.jpg  
JRcruz
Thread Starter
#30
2nd October 2012
Old 2nd October 2012
  #30
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldone View Post
This is likely your issue. Either record outside or find a bigger room or....did you treat your floor and ceiling?
Yes. I got 4" fiberglass Clouds,bass traps and broadbands in the room with harwood floors,I placed a mat under where I'm recording to avoid too much reflections. It's not live but also not completely dead.
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