rafter@vt.edu
Thread Starter
#1
3rd June 2008
Old 3rd June 2008
  #1
Gear interested
 
rafter@vt.edu's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Monitor Hype

I've been looking for my first set of monitors to replace my studio headphones (and am new to the recording world). Can someone explain what the term "hype" means when describing a monitor's response?
#2
3rd June 2008
Old 3rd June 2008
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Weasel9992's Avatar
 

It means that the monitor gives you an exaggerated response in a certain part of the frequency spectrum. There are plenty of "monitors" out there that are anything but flat in terms of response...they're hyped in the highs and/or the lows, and the net result is that you can't really tell what's in your mix. You can't rely on your monitors because they're lying to you.

Frank
#3
3rd June 2008
Old 3rd June 2008
  #3
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
It means the monitor sounds really pleasing because it covers up problems.
#4
3rd June 2008
Old 3rd June 2008
  #4
Lives for gear
 
staudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Weasel9992 View Post
It means that the monitor gives you an exaggerated response in a certain part of the frequency spectrum. There are plenty of "monitors" out there that are anything but flat in terms of response...they're hyped in the highs and/or the lows, and the net result is that you can't really tell what's in your mix. You can't rely on your monitors because they're lying to you.

Frank
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Olhsson View Post
It means the monitor sounds really pleasing because it covers up problems.
+1 for each
#5
4th June 2008
Old 4th June 2008
  #5
Lives for gear
 
barefoot's Avatar
 

I would also tend to agree with both descriptions above. However, the exaggerations involved are often not so obvious as simple frequency response variations. A speaker can have a relatively flat on-axis response yet still sound "hyped".

Here are some examples. Let's assume they all measure flat on-axis:
Larger 8" and 10" 2-way speakers can sound scooped in the midrange because their woofers become very directional in their upper frequency range, beaming like a flashlight. Since there is less off-axis energy (usually in the range of 1kHz to 3kHz) the speaker will sound recessed in this range, coloring the mix with a pleasing "smiley face" EQ character.

Smaller 5" and 6" 2-way speakers can sound punchy in the upper bass and lower midrange. When smaller woofers are pushed to give deeper bass response than they can optimally reproduce they also generate quite a bit of harmonic distortion to go with it. These harmonics land right in the upper bass and lower midrange giving a sense of punch that doesn't actually exist in the mix.

Ported and passive radiator speakers will sometimes have "robust" sounding bass. The ports and passive radiators are basically resonators that ring out and enhance the bass output. These resonators sacrifice quick transient response but their slower blooming character can make certain bass notes sound like they have more authority.
Yes, my designs are 3-way sealed box. So I do have some prejudices.
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