Login / Register
 
Live sound/FOH
View Poll Results: Live sound?
Never do FOH. Too scary
7 Votes - 7.07%
Sometimes run FOH
32 Votes - 32.32%
About 50/50 with the studio
24 Votes - 24.24%
More FOH then studio
18 Votes - 18.18%
Almost all FOH
16 Votes - 16.16%
Stand by FOH engineer, try to be his friend, ride the odd fader on acts doing important showcase gigs
2 Votes - 2.02%
Voters: 99. You may not vote on this poll

New Reply
Subscribe
Jay Kahrs
Thread Starter
#1
6th January 2004
Old 6th January 2004
  #1
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Earth, NYC metro
Posts: 5,907
My Recordings/Credits

Thread Starter
Send a message via AIM to Jay Kahrs Send a message via Skype™ to Jay Kahrs
Jay Kahrs is offline
Live sound/FOH

Just curious, how many people here do FOH on a regular basis? There's a lot more to sound and audio engineering then the studio...how do you branch out?
__________________
J. 'Moose' Kahrs
producer|mixer|recordist
MooseAudio.com
mooseaudio.bandcamp.com
Quote:
All you need to make a record is a mic, some tape and maybe some bad reverb...
#2
6th January 2004
Old 6th January 2004
  #2
Gear addict
 
fatty's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2002
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 348

fatty is offline
i do a lot more foh than studio work (my "studio" is just a spare room at home). but i only do foh these days for bands i like, (would have gone to the gig anyway if i wasn't doing foh). i still manage to keep myself as busy as i'd like. in the past i did the "trash for cash" foh gigs but i figured it just wasn't worth it for me. i work in a small circle of bands, playing mostly loud sloppy punk \ rock, and generally i get as drunk as they do (if not, more ), and i just enjoy my nights out and at the end of the night go home drunk with more money in my pocket than i had at the start of the night. hey, it works for me!
#3
6th January 2004
Old 6th January 2004
  #3
Gear addict
 
ExistanceMusic's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2003
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 476

ExistanceMusic is offline
I'm a house engineer at a club here in Melbourne, sweetest job I've ever had, although I'm now considering the effect it may have on my hearing over time.
Need to get round to seeing an audiologist....
Mostly world music, lots of interesting people and instruments, so it never gets all THAT loud, but it would be good to know where my hearings at now, so I have a reference to checking it again in a years time.
__________________
Jesse Mahoney

ExistanceMusic :at: hotmail dot com
Jay Kahrs
Thread Starter
#4
7th January 2004
Old 7th January 2004
  #4
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Earth, NYC metro
Posts: 5,907
My Recordings/Credits

Thread Starter
Send a message via AIM to Jay Kahrs Send a message via Skype™ to Jay Kahrs
Jay Kahrs is offline
The best investment I've made for live sound was getting fitted earplugs. It was a $150 for the molds with 15dB filters. There's no way I could do those gigs without them. I put them in after the first few songs and then pretty much leave them in until the crowd leaves at the end of the night.
#5
7th January 2004
Old 7th January 2004
  #5
Lives for gear
 
Drumsound's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: Bloomington Il
Posts: 6,906

Drumsound is offline
I mixed some friends a few times a few years back. I felt like a fish out of water and hope to never do it again. For all of you who can and do do FOH my hat's off to you!
__________________
Tony
Oxide Lounge Recording
See the Oxide Lounge!
Follow me on TWITTER!

WWJMD?

Come see me on the Tape Op boards!

It's only inches on the reel to reel
#6
7th January 2004
Old 7th January 2004
  #6
Gear addict
 
fatty's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2002
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 348

fatty is offline
hey tony, the trick to doing FOH gigs is to realise that (unlike studio gigs) your audience will accept a "work in progress" mix for a song or 2.
also, you just have to work with what you've got. if after a song or 2 you decide that you should have mic'd the bass instead of d.i'd it, well suck it up buddy. accept it and move on.
then again, if there are things you can fix quickly (and i really emphasise QUICKLY), there is no reason you can't jump on stage between songs and adjust a mic or 2. for example, last saturday night i moved a mic on the bass amp from the 15inch cab to the 10ich cab between songs and the bass sound improved outta sight.
it's funny coz i'm usually pretty relaxed on my FOH gigs. but i freak out on my recording gigs (mainly coz i fret on the stability of my mac, and i worry about mic placement). i guess the moral of the story is that you studio guys should relax when confronted with the FOH gigs, and i should stop freaking out when i do the studio gigs.
#7
7th January 2004
Old 7th January 2004
  #7
Gear maniac
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: NYC area
Posts: 193

NYC Drew is offline
I've been mixing FOH since 1987...about 16 or 17 years. Been doing live audio (stage tech / mon engineer / system tech) for about 19 years...

Have worked (or still work with)

Maxi Priest
Wayne Wonder
Diana King
J.T. Taylor
Supercat
Space Hog
Mykal Rose (of Black Uhuru)

etc etc

I'm been "off the road" since thanksgiving (did +160 days last year)...nothing doing until April 04 - focusing on business (IT) at home....

I can say with pride and shame that I've never tracked and mixed an entire studio album in my life! Never used "tape" in the studio - don't have any DAWs...life is still good.
__________________
NYC Drew
#8
7th January 2004
Old 7th January 2004
  #8
Gearslutz.com admin
 
Jules's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2002
Location: A Yank in London, UK

Jules is offline
Sometimes live shows are too important a deal to trust the house engineer.

I pretty much know most of the house engineers on the 'toilet circuit" new band venues in my town.

So I have developed ways to get on with these often 'prickly' characters and get in there to help the show along. What I dred and my whole time is spent avoiding, is the - 'ok buster YOU DO IT!' threat. The fact is I respect them, but they dont know the material or where all the solos are and ALL (sorry!) usually batter to death the audience with over loud drums & vocals and super quiet gtrs. If I am involved with an act I will get in there and be the shows mix partner, (aggrivating as that might be for the FOH guys, but they will get over it)
#9
7th January 2004
Old 7th January 2004
  #9
Gear addict
 
fatty's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2002
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 348

fatty is offline
Quote:
Originally posted by Jules
...and ALL (sorry!) usually batter to death the audience with over loud drums & vocals and super quiet gtrs.
not me! i'm a guitarist, so i like to mix the guitars loud. i know exactly what you mean though, a lot of guys do mix that way. i find it very annoying also!
Jay Kahrs
Thread Starter
#10
9th January 2004
Old 9th January 2004
  #10
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Earth, NYC metro
Posts: 5,907
My Recordings/Credits

Thread Starter
Send a message via AIM to Jay Kahrs Send a message via Skype™ to Jay Kahrs
Jay Kahrs is offline
Quote:
Originally posted by Jules
So I have developed ways to get on with these often 'prickly' characters and get in there to help the show along. What I dred and my whole time is spent avoiding, is the - 'ok buster YOU DO IT!' threat. The fact is I respect them, but they dont know the material or where all the solos are and ALL (sorry!) usually batter to death the audience with over loud drums & vocals and super quiet gtrs. If I am involved with an act I will get in there and be the shows mix partner, (aggrivating as that might be for the FOH guys, but they will get over it)
I've told plenty of "mix helpers" to **** off before and one time I walked away from the board so they could mix it themselves.

The honest truth is that 90% of the time people are "trying" to help they are only succeeding in aggravating me and I end up missing cues and stuff. The best deal is to hand the FOH engineer a set list with cues on it and then stay out of their way. If the show and band is really that important then they'll be traveling with their own FOH engineer and/or a road manager who knows how to handle those things. The bands "producer" is usually VERY unwelcome. I'll get mix layering suggestions and tips during soundcheck (if there is one) and from that point I need to listen and watch cues. Anyway, if the mix is balanced to begin with then chances are good that nobody in the audience will notice that the first bar of the solo wasn't as loud as the rest of it. As long as the vocals are loud enough and the mix isn't thin the rest of it ALMOST doesn't matter and can be subject to change. But the second the vocals get buried people are all over me.

Fatty - Totally the right idea on FOH vs. studio. I started doing FOH to keep me on my toes and so I could experiment a bit. Now, five, almost six years later it's become a big staple of my work. Not quite 50/50 but really close on some months.
#11
9th January 2004
Old 9th January 2004
  #11
Gearslutz.com admin
 
Jules's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2002
Location: A Yank in London, UK

Jules is offline
Like I said (edited)

"I have developed ways to get on with these often 'prickly' characters"

"What I dred and my whole time is spent avoiding, is the - 'ok buster YOU DO IT!' threat"

"The fact is I respect them"

"I will get in there and be the shows mix partner, (aggrivating as that might be for the FOH guys, but they will get over it)"



A cranky live engineer is a real PITA to deal with, but I do deal, as I am not going to let someone performing a 1 hour task with a band they have never met, ruin with a grouchy ego something I may have many months of studio time invested in in front of a room full of music industry big wigs.

As a breed, I find the small club guys are pretty hostile.

Nevermind, they must bend to my will stike
#12
9th January 2004
Old 9th January 2004
  #12
Gearslutz.com admin
 
Jules's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2002
Location: A Yank in London, UK

Jules is offline
Like I said (edited)

"I have developed ways to get on with these often 'prickly' characters"

"What I dred and my whole time is spent avoiding, is the - 'ok buster YOU DO IT!' threat"

"The fact is I respect them"

"I will get in there and be the shows mix partner, (aggrivating as that might be for the FOH guys, but they will get over it)"



A cranky live engineer is a real PITA to deal with, but I do deal, as I am not going to let someone performing a 1 hour task ruin with a grouchy ego something I may have many months of studio time invested in in front of a room full of music industry big wigs.
#13
9th January 2004
Old 9th January 2004
  #13
Gear addict
 
fatty's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2002
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 348

fatty is offline
i'm not a house guy, but i get the "mix helper" scenario occasionally, although not to the extent jules is talking about. there are 2 kinds i've dealt with:

1: the bands manager / producer. i did f.o.h for a band who switch lead vocal between the drummer and guitarist on different songs. this guy hands me a set list before the show with notes on who sings lead on which songs, and stand by the desk and makes a couple of suggestions during the show. polite guy, good attitude, no problem. i'll always get along fine with these kinda gyus unless they ask me to do something i knwo the band wouldn't like. eg drummer says to me before the show "don't put any reverb on the snare, i hate that shit." well no matter how much you beg me mr. producer, i ain't gonna add reverb to that snare.

2: the band's drunk friend: walks up to the desk between songs and abuses me and tells me to "stop that farkin feedback you dickhead!". i point out to him that the lead guitarist has 3 distortion pedals running into his p.o.s solid state crate amp, and has forgotten to turn them off. i even show him that i have muted the channel. he refuses to beleive me, insisting that the squeeling is coming from the p.a. this guy is not much fun to deal with.
Jay Kahrs
Thread Starter
#14
13th January 2004
Old 13th January 2004
  #14
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Earth, NYC metro
Posts: 5,907
My Recordings/Credits

Thread Starter
Send a message via AIM to Jay Kahrs Send a message via Skype™ to Jay Kahrs
Jay Kahrs is offline
Sometimes it's not even the bands drunk friend but a road manager or club owner who's a total PITA. They're the type of person that hangs over the console, asking millions of questions and suggestions and generally making me hate life. Sure, give me suggestions on mix layering, effects and stuff like that, walk around the room and let me know if the mix sounds weird or you can't hear someone...that's good. Telling me exactly what fader to move when and hanging on me like a leach is bad.

I have an Audix T-shirt that says "Don't piss off the sound guy". There was a club in Eastern PA that called me in to mix FOH one night as a fill-in. Nothing crazy, just a regular walk-in but I had never been to the room before and only knew it by reputation. Without going into details of the wiring there were all kinds of zones setup for the place which were semi-tied together so changing one affects the others in some way. The owner insisted on mixing over my shoulder (to the point of actually moving me out of the way to get to console) and was telling me that while it sounded really good where the band was playing it was just "ok" over in the pool room and horrible in his office to which I replied that I was mixing for the people who were watching the band and not for the people who would rather play pool and I definitely NOT mixing for his office. This guy was such a pain the balls that it was the only time I've ever walked out of a club while mixing.
#15
13th January 2004
Old 13th January 2004
  #15
Gear nut
 
Joined: Oct 2003
Location: boston
Posts: 92

flame Linear is offline
I had a large sound sytem I rented(well still have a few small and mid size sound sytems).in the day.
Did live sound from 78 to early 90,s with my own eqipment.
Still have a few flame linears liying around to heat the house when it gots real real cold in Boston.
Started building a studio in early 80,s when all the clubs started to buy ther own sound sytems killing the rental busness.
I do miss mixing at the rat.
__________________
"Dam just blew up the moniters" Maybe its the amp again
Jay Kahrs
Thread Starter
#16
13th January 2004
Old 13th January 2004
  #16
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Earth, NYC metro
Posts: 5,907
My Recordings/Credits

Thread Starter
Send a message via AIM to Jay Kahrs Send a message via Skype™ to Jay Kahrs
Jay Kahrs is offline
Flame Linear...

LMFBO!

Nice posting name thumbsup
#17
14th January 2004
Old 14th January 2004
  #17
Gear interested
 
salty's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2002
Location: Newport, Wales
Posts: 16

salty is offline
I do 50/50...

I cut my teeth as a 'prickly pear' house engineer in the late 80's, now I'm doing live stuff for a couple of bands that rehearse and record in my place.

I go out on tour with one band - that can be fun! You never know if you'll be using a DDA CS8 or a Bearringer Eurotrash from night to night.

I also get a phone call a few times a year from one or two local house engineers to see if I can cover while they're on stage/sick/on holiday/in prison(only joking about the prison bit).

This one bloke I cover for has the most fugly mixer I have ever laid my hands on.
It's an old Studiomaster Diamond 16/2 with only 12 channels working and only 2 or 3 fader tops still on - the rest are just bare metal. When the place is full and the music is really pumping you sometimes have to drive it so hard the level indicators are permanantly maxed out. If you crane your neck you can just see the Amp rack down by the Stage, and you can see the Indicators on the top amp. The trick is to keep an eye on that VU and keep it out of the red.
It sounds surprisingly good on Punk/Metal though, I must add.
__________________
---
+48v Studios
Newport Wales
01633 264144
Jay Kahrs
Thread Starter
#18
14th January 2004
Old 14th January 2004
  #18
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Earth, NYC metro
Posts: 5,907
My Recordings/Credits

Thread Starter
Send a message via AIM to Jay Kahrs Send a message via Skype™ to Jay Kahrs
Jay Kahrs is offline
Oh man...Check this out and see if you can beat it...

Old ass Yomama 16 channel desk with 13 working channels (aside from effects returns), one monitor mix with four barely working Yomama monitors of the same vintage. We're talkin' Muddy Waters had played though that rig and the owner didn't want to replace it "because Muddy had passed through there" vintage. Crown Powerbase 2's all around driving a set of Bose 802's and a single matching sub...mics were all SM57's and SM58's that had seen MUCH better days...probably purchased in the 70's and used almost daily since then. Room holds about 300 and has wood floors and a tin ceiling about 8' from each other. The FOH rack consisted of a Microverb, a single 3630 (one side on FOH and the other on monitors) and an Ashly graphic EQ and crossover.

I could never do anything more then "attempt" to mix in that room. I kind of relearned that SR stands for Sound Reinforcement rather then Sound Replacement. The key was to find the loudest thing off the stage and bring the lowest thing upto that while keeping the vocals out front. What a nightmare, still...there were some great bands coming through there. Still, I love my current gig.
#19
16th January 2004
Old 16th January 2004
  #19
Lives for gear
 
studjo's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 2,474

Send a message via AIM to studjo Send a message via Skype™ to studjo
studjo is offline
Jay that's the festival rig I had 6 years ago. I was travelling with a band and at this festival there was your rig except it was a Soundcraft spirit (ouch-I never write this name again) no fornt eq and no dynamics (thank God I have my own little Dyn. rig)

Btw Jules don't cross my way or you have to mix your band alone
I don't get it, when you know your band why don't you mix it yourself? The house eng. would do the ugly part (front and monitor eq) - the rest is up to you - you can do your magic live!

Jo
#20
26th January 2004
Old 26th January 2004
  #20
Gear Head
 
Joined: Mar 2003
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Posts: 52

Doug Ring is offline
It's a Control Freak thing isn't it?

Most of us are CFs. It's what we love about the job, and why we hate it when somebody comes along that wants to take control away. "Well, you better prove you're better than me, buddy!"

One of the most unpleasant experiences I had was trying to do live sound for a well known British act (clue: fame at any price). The whole band were the grumpiest, out-of-their-heads bunch of a-holes I've ever met. They didn't even like our concert-grand Steinway (as if we were going to change THAT at a moment's notice!), and they had this tour manager who had "worked on the Old Grey Whistle Test" (British TV show that had finished airing some ten years before) and so obviously knew all there was to know. Example: (indicates Leslie cabinet some 15 feet away from a backing vocalist's mike) "That Leslie will just come screaming down that mike - you'll have to put it in another room." (right - a 50watt amp 15 feet from a close-miked vocalist, that'll be a big problem on a live show...and have YOU got the extension cable for the Hammond? BTW, where do you imagine the other room is?) Me: "I don't HAVE to do anything. Plus there are six other acts on the bill. Maybe you should go back to the Old Grey Whistle Test." The galling bit was, come the show, the audience loved them. But when they tried to hit on all the women in the production team and drank the Green Room dry, we were back to hating them again.

Contrast that with gentleman bass player Herbie Flowers, who came in next day carrying his own upright bass, extended his hand when he saw me at the desk and said, "Hello, I'm Herbie. Is it all right to put my bass on the stage?" Lovely guy: he was doing a bass solo during one live broadcast from our studio; halfway through he pitched in the riff from "Walk on the Wild Side" and said, "I got paid twelve quid for that...

So I hate FOH for the low life you mostly have to work with, who sadly seem to outnumber the Mr Flowers of this world.

And I hate all the FOH engineers who reduce all the bottom end to a dull rumble - kick drums that last half a second and bass guitars whose notes are undecipherable. "This rig goes down to 20Hz and you're damned well going to hear it". You'd swear these guys had never heard an instrument on its own in their lives.

Oh dear. Wish I could say something positive.

Rant over.
#21
26th January 2004
Old 26th January 2004
  #21
Lives for gear
 
studjo's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 2,474

Send a message via AIM to studjo Send a message via Skype™ to studjo
studjo is offline
I don't know whether it's a control freak thingy or not. It just never occurred to me that 2 eng. could do a rock band better than 1 eng. alone.
You have to work fast doing FOH so you can't argue with another opinion like you could in the studio. You only got one shot so you better concentrate yourself to the stage and your own perception of the sound system.

I like mixing with another eng. in the studio but live is a whole other can of worms IMNSHO - YMMV ....

Jo
#22
27th January 2004
Old 27th January 2004
  #22
Gear addict
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: Elm Tree Ont. Canada
Posts: 337

Logan is offline
I used to do a lot of FOH and I still do some. I loved working with all the blues guys, they never wanted a sound check the band always vamped before the star came on and I could get a basic mix down. Did virtually every big name blues act in the mid 80's.
I hate sound checks in an empty room that is nowhere near what the room will be like when it's full. I always say to the band "just don't play the hit first". I work now with a few different bands and that's the way to go, 'cause you learn all the cues and quirks. I carry a rack with 6 different verbs in it so I can change up the vocal verbs and add guitar verbs when necessary and change up snare verbs for ballads and rockers etc. Only use comps on the kick snare and bass and usually straped across the main mix buss, ride the faders for vocals and guitars.
For a number of years I did an indie festival with 15 to 20 bands all by myself. 10 minutes to tear down the stage and set up another band and off we go again. Had amps lined up ready to move into place, and we used the same kit, occasionaly changing snare. The band was often hitting their first chord as I ran back to the board. Setup the PA at 11:00 am and the first band went on at 1:00 pm and it ended when the cops arrived to shut us down, usually not long before dawn. Hope I'll always do at least some FOH, .cause there's a buzz happening at a live gig that never happens at the studio. I can live without the 4:00 am rides, in a snow storm, coming home with a truck full of gear that has to be unloaded before you sleep tho' ;-). Take care Logan
Jay Kahrs
Thread Starter
#23
27th January 2004
Old 27th January 2004
  #23
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Earth, NYC metro
Posts: 5,907
My Recordings/Credits

Thread Starter
Send a message via AIM to Jay Kahrs Send a message via Skype™ to Jay Kahrs
Jay Kahrs is offline
Quote:
Originally posted by Doug Ring
And I hate all the FOH engineers who reduce all the bottom end to a dull rumble - kick drums that last half a second and bass guitars whose notes are undecipherable. "This rig goes down to 20Hz and you're damned well going to hear it". You'd swear these guys had never heard an instrument on its own in their lives.
Ya gotta love the big smile curve on the FOH EQ, makes everything sound like a metal record before you push up the fader. Sometimes I think the rooms are to blame, rather then the PA.

I guess I'm lucky, most of the bands I've gotten to work with have been great and about half of the time I never have to deal with the band and I'm dealing with the road manager or their FOH person. The only one's that are a real PITA are some of the local bands who think they're WAY bigger then they actually are.
#24
27th January 2004
Old 27th January 2004
  #24
Gear Head
 
Joined: Mar 2003
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Posts: 52

Doug Ring is offline
Quote:
15 to 20 bands all by myself. 10 minutes to tear down the stage and set up another band and off we go again.
Logan, you're da man! I never could handle that pressure before somebody would look at me the wrong way and I'd explode ... but then, I never did sound for anybody I was really into - they always seemed to be the ones that think they're bigger than they are.

And Jay - the damned smile curve has been responsible for more sh*t sound than anything else on the planet! You used to catch FOH guys during setup playing Peter Gabriel through the rig and adjusting their graphics for maximum punch with those huge synth bass notes. Then they'd try to get a live acoustic guitar duo to match that sound...
#25
27th January 2004
Old 27th January 2004
  #25
Gear Head
 
Joined: Mar 2003
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Posts: 52

Doug Ring is offline
...And since I'm being Mr Bitter & Twisted, here's another tale of woe.

My own band had been booked to do a few Woody Guthrie songs at a tribute concert. As the one with live sound experience, I was helping with the mic changes between acts. One of them was a tiny, somewhat frail lady who, I was told, had been part of a very well-known Scottish folk band in her youth. She hadn't been seen in ages, and there was a buzz about her actually playing live again. I attempted to put a mic out for her and she backed away. Moved it closer and she backed away again. She had a hideously out-of-tune guitar and her tiny voice matched it. I couldn't get any volume through the PA for her, and she clearly didn't want any, so I gave up and went and sat next door.

Five minutes later, an incandescent punter burst in. "Are you the bloody sound engineer?" he yelled. "No, I'm one of the..." "I'd hate to think that (faded folk legend) is up there and we can't hear her because of you!" A glaring match ensued. "No", I said finally, "She's doing that all by herself."

Needless to say, my band didn't get the most sympathetic reception when it came to our slot...
Jay Kahrs
Thread Starter
#26
28th January 2004
Old 28th January 2004
  #26
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Earth, NYC metro
Posts: 5,907
My Recordings/Credits

Thread Starter
Send a message via AIM to Jay Kahrs Send a message via Skype™ to Jay Kahrs
Jay Kahrs is offline
Quote:
Originally posted by Doug Ring
Logan, you're da man! I never could handle that pressure before somebody would look at me the wrong way and I'd explode ... but then, I never did sound for anybody I was really into - they always seemed to be the ones that think they're bigger than they are.
I worked at a tiny club/restraunt/brew pub for three years under pretty bad conditions. From there I managed to work my way into an A level (on the blues circuit) club. Our non-blues nationals were mostly C level acts...we tried to get Little Feat at one point and it just wasn't gonna happen.

Now I'm at a place in Teaneck, NJ called Mexicali Blues and damn...it's great. Since it reopened on Thanksgiving Eve we've had LOTS of great shows with great artists and people. Last Friday I worked with the Derek Trucks Band. Ya know, Derek Trucks from the Allman Brothers...yeah...good shows. They brought they're own guy to do FOH and Marty was easy as hell to work with. I got there at 3:30, striked and wired the stage, helped the opener (Melvin Sparks) setup, mixed the opener and then sat on the side of the stage about a foot from Dereks amp all night. Right now I'm waiting for the picutres to get developed...I'll have to post some if they come out ok. Like a nimrod I forgot the digital camera. Doh!

Quote:
And Jay - the damned smile curve has been responsible for more sh*t sound than anything else on the planet! You used to catch FOH guys during setup playing Peter Gabriel through the rig and adjusting their graphics for maximum punch with those huge synth bass notes. Then they'd try to get a live acoustic guitar duo to match that sound...
I start by whacking off the highest and lowest bands on the house EQ and then setting it flat. Usually as the night progresses I'll start hacking away at it but it always scares me when I walk into a room and see none of the bands on the house graphic at their detents.

Logan - Some of the best training I got was working at the first club. They used to do these 12-14 hour benefits and I usually got the latter half of the day with the rock bands. Everyone got a 15-20 minute set and 5-10 to change over between bands. Usually there was someone raffeling tickets off or making an announcement while the next band was setting up and we're dodging waiters and waitresses the whole time because the stage was right next to the kitchen door.

I don't miss those days one bit.
#27
30th July 2009
Old 30th July 2009
  #27
Lives for gear
 
jude's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,297

jude is offline
Just digging up an old thread...

how do we differ today, many of us doing FOH/Monitors?

i still do the odd spot of FOH here and there, i mainly stick to a few select bands, and festivals that friends put on. that said i have mixed for some of australias bigger rock acts, and monitors for many american hip hop groups to tour australia... good times
#28
30th July 2009
Old 30th July 2009
  #28
Lives for gear
 
Jim vanBergen's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: New York Friggin' City
Posts: 2,572

Jim vanBergen is offline
Hey, Jude-

After 20 years of this I still get hired on a regular basis to either mix FOH or monitors, because decades of doing both, as well as truck mixes, post mixes, and studio work, I rarely lose my sh*t at people while getting it done. I've had plenty of people come tell me my mix is ideal, and plenty of folks say "more guitar, move kick, more trombone" to whom IO say "thanks" and ignore unless they were introduced to me during soundcheck as "the person who has final say".

Most of the time, I have either worked with the artist before, or I'm there because I'm "the guy" so I am left alone and Mr. "More Trombone" is a f*kkin' trombone player.

My job is to make it sound like the record... and I can do that in spades. When it's monitors, it's make it sound like whatever they want, 110%, no "no can do", all "yep, how's that?".

Just agreed to the the monitor engineer at a festival with acts who don't travel with their own people, should be fun. I'm used to doing FOH for most festivals acts. I guess I'll set up 16 wedge mixes and 8 stereo IEM mixes on a dual-input (two idental splitters into one head) 56-channel festival plot.

Cheers!

JvB
#29
2nd August 2009
Old 2nd August 2009
  #29
Lives for gear
 
jude's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,297

jude is offline
hi jim thanks for the reply!
good to see ther is another FOH/monitor person here
not doing big gigs myself anymore, but the little ones tend to be more of a challenge for me anyway, guess it could be because i dont spend weeks sorting out input lists etc
#30
2nd August 2009
Old 2nd August 2009
  #30
Gear addict
 
soulviasound's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Berlin
Posts: 336

Send a message via Skype™ to soulviasound
soulviasound is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Kahrs View Post
Just curious, how many people here do FOH on a regular basis? There's a lot more to sound and audio engineering then the studio...how do you branch out?
FOH work it's very diferent from studio work. One of the secret in this job it's preparation. It's very nice to do both because sometime you need to get the live atmosphere and sometime the plesure of good recordings. It's almost same amont of engineering in both case. Live performance asking you more electronics/electrical handle and headroom understand of sound reinforcement. Like studio work, the final sound it's musician raported. Garbage in, garbage out. Sometime the artist can be very dificult but it's a normal way.
__________________
http://www.soulviasound.com

For Sale - Gefell UM92.1s (classic M7) on GS here
New Reply Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook  Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter  Submit Thread to LinkedIn LinkedIn  Submit Thread to Google+ Google+ 
 
Topic:
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
saggsy / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music & Location Recording
183
Harley-OIART / Live Sound
3
1979 / Live Sound
6
kittonian / Live Sound
13

Forum Jump

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.