does this amp power cable idea seem decent?
pixeltarian
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#1
28th January 2013
Old 28th January 2013
  #1
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Thread Starter
does this amp power cable idea seem decent?

#2
28th January 2013
Old 28th January 2013
  #2
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Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

Well, you have not revealed either what power amplifier you are taking about or what current rating it needs, so it isn't really possible to offer any particular comment.

Are the connectors at each end rated for the current you amp needs? Is 18GA sufficient for "longish" (whatever that means?) at the current your amp wants? It is easy enough to find an online website that will tell you what wire gauge is required for a particular current over a particular distance.
S21
#3
29th January 2013
Old 29th January 2013
  #3
S21
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It looks cool and retro but over here it wouldn't be legal...
#4
29th January 2013
Old 29th January 2013
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Wow, that Sundial Wire has old Knob & Tube wiring supplies. Knob & Tube AC power wiring became unpopular after World War II.

18AWG is way to small for any power amplifier.
pixeltarian
Thread Starter
#5
29th January 2013
Old 29th January 2013
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Thread Starter
It's for guitar amps, mostly my 50w amp.
#6
29th January 2013
Old 29th January 2013
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How about 14AWG?
S21
#7
29th January 2013
Old 29th January 2013
  #7
S21
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18 AWG is plenty thick enough for a 50w amp at 115vac.

While it looks like this wire is built to carry mains voltages, there isn't enough information to assess the mechanical strength/durability, flammability, insulation, cut/crush resistance etc.

But yes, it will look cooler than a dull ordinary grey bit of mains flex. The connectors you have selected seem appropriate.
#8
29th January 2013
Old 29th January 2013
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LeeYoo's Avatar
 

AFAIK, mains flex has to be double insulated.
Single insulated is only ok for low voltage.
This might not be where you are.
Leo..
#9
29th January 2013
Old 29th January 2013
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The linked wire is designed for antique lamp or appliance restorers and collectors.
pixeltarian
Thread Starter
#10
29th January 2013
Old 29th January 2013
  #10
Gear nut
 

Thread Starter
There's also this:
bplighting on Etsy

But I assume it's the same specs. Sundial also has 12 and 14G wire, but more limited in color options (black and silver for 14G and black only for 12G)

I wonder if there is a company that makes cloth wrapped cable suitable for audio applications. If not, maybe it's time...
#11
30th January 2013
Old 30th January 2013
  #11
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Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeYoo View Post
AFAIK, mains flex has to be double insulated.
Single insulated is only ok for low voltage.
This might not be where you are.
We have no clue where pixeltarian since he/she/it has not completed the user profile. Presumably from our same planet somewhere.
pixeltarian
Thread Starter
#12
30th January 2013
Old 30th January 2013
  #12
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcrowley View Post
We have no clue where pixeltarian since he/she/it has not completed the user profile. Presumably from our same planet somewhere.
that's odd. I had my profile filled out at one time. poof. I filled it out again just now.
#13
30th January 2013
Old 30th January 2013
  #13
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S2udio's Avatar
 

Why not use a standard approved cable...?

Sorry...I do not understand the logic and/or the safety issues ?

....or is it just for the art !

Cloth-covered-cables....!!

This "vintage style" cable was acceptable in the 30's



Chinese imported cable
?
Happy sparks !!

If building your own power cables........

Use approved parts

#14
30th January 2013
Old 30th January 2013
  #14
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Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

Observe (UL_info) that the vendor acknowledges that NO cloth-covered cable (including theirs) is UL-Recognized. It is not likely to cause trouble PROVIDING YOU SIZE IT PROPERLY!!!. However if there IS any trouble your fire insurance is likely forfeit. That seems like a very BAD tradeoff for the looks of a vintage power cord. YMMV.
S21
#15
30th January 2013
Old 30th January 2013
  #15
S21
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If you do the job properly there won't be a problem.

If your handiwork starts a fire (unlikely) then the insurance cover will probably be questionable regardless of whether you used UL listed parts or not. The cloth covered wire looks so much more robust than some of the thin 2-core cable on cheap appliances.

There must be some source of UL listed cloth covered cable. I think irons still come with cloth covered cords. They are round and don't really have the retro look though.

Searching online I came across someone who had used climbing rope (woven kernmantle rope) to cover modern cable. They stripped the core out of the rope and put the braid over modern power flex. If I wanted the retro look I'd probably just use the cable from the website.
#16
31st January 2013
Old 31st January 2013
  #16
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Lotus 7's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by S2udio View Post

Chinese imported cable
?
The Sundial cloth covered cable is made in the United States (it's still "imported" if you live in the UK) and uses polyvinyl chloride insulation, unlike the old 1930's cloth over natural rubber which becomes brittle and dangerous. Non-cloth covered PVC insulated wire is "today's most widely used electrical insulation material" . It's very unlikely that adding an additional layer of braided cotton or rayon fabric over the already excellent insulation poses any additional safety issues compared to a much more common single layer of PVC.

Wire of 18 ga. is rated for 2.3 amps for continuous power transmission applications. That's 265 watts on 115 volt mains. Even an old, inefficient 50 watt guitar amplifier won't be using anything like that much power. It's unlikely the amp will draw more than 1 ampere average current.

25 feet (8 meters) of 18 ga. 2-conductor power cable will have a total drop (calculated from the resistance of both conductors in series) of 3.15 volts(@1 Ampere). That slight line drop should easily be tolerated by any guitar amp.

The inductance created by ugly Ferrite beads have will have much more RFI rejection than the cool, retro cotton or rayon covering which only blocks pre-1960 radio waves. Unless you have known radio frequency noise sources nearby, or noisy stage lighting dimmers, there is no need for ferrite beads on a power cable, and besides they ruin the whole retro look. Note: If you use a weave-covered power cable, a woven guitar cable is mandatory or you'll drop your coolness factor by at least 6 dB.

Just do it!
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