One guitar through two amps?
Old 2nd March 2011
  #1
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One guitar through two amps?

Ive got two tube amps that I want to play through simultaneously. Whats the best way to do this? I know of 3 possibilities; daisy chain, y-cable, and ABY box. What are the advantages/disadvantages of each, and whats the best way to play one guitar through two amps?
Old 2nd March 2011
  #2
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Old 3rd March 2011
  #3
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Mild's Avatar
 

Or you could buy a stereo out's pedal and then you'd have an A/B and a cool effect!

Try an old Boss DD-3 or something similarly cheap and awesome.
Old 3rd March 2011
  #4
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I have a Apex ABY pedal that has served well.
Old 3rd March 2011
  #5
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Thread Starter
What about the daisy chain method or a y-cable? I really like my setup simple and I'd rather not use an ABY box or other pedal.
Old 3rd March 2011
  #6
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spiderman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BJGMD View Post
What about the daisy chain method or a y-cable? I really like my setup simple and I'd rather not use an ABY box or other pedal.
Not recommended. You should break down and go with the ABY if you really want to run two amps. Radial JX-2 is awesome but also expensive. If money is an issue look on eBay for PepTone or check out Morley.
Old 3rd March 2011
  #7
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monomono's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mild View Post
Or you could buy a stereo out's pedal and then you'd have an A/B and a cool effect!
I use this: Boss PN-2 Tremolo/Panner
Or sometimes a stereo chorus.
Just put the pedal in bypass and the guitar is simply split to both amps.
Old 3rd March 2011
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BJGMD View Post
What about the daisy chain method or a y-cable? I really like my setup simple and I'd rather not use an ABY box or other pedal.

anything that you do is going to change the sound one way or another... loading the pickups, change of tone via the insertion of additional electronics.. it is going to be hard to make this invisible. Back in the day I carried 10 speaker cabinets and a combination of Marshalls (a 50 watt Marshall as a preamp) and Crown amplification. The sound company handled the split from the Marshall to the Crowns, but I just fed the guitar (well, the pedal board output...) into one Marshall input, looped 2 and 3 together, and used 4 as the output feed to the split for the Crowns.

I think that Graig Anderton had a buffered guitar splitter kit at one point.
Radial makes a great one. Little labs has one. I don't think that it will be hard to find an answer that gives the electrical guys what they like to see and think is safe (isolation among amplification boxes) while still giving you a reasonable way to split.


Now if you are just trying to be cheap, wye or loop and be done with it.
Old 3rd March 2011
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by BJGMD View Post
What about the daisy chain method or a y-cable? I really like my setup simple and I'd rather not use an ABY box or other pedal.
It really depends on what your goal is. I'm currently experimenting with 'dasiy-chaining' a Fender Champ and a Vibrolux or DeVille and to my ears the sound is much better when doing so instead of using a splitter. But the splitter will be the way to go if you want to retain the individual amp sounds as much as possible.

Years ago I had a moment of revelation (or rather ) I bought a Whirlwind AB box only to find that it TOTALLY killed the sound and finally I used a cheapo Danelectro pedal that had two outputs which worked GREAT and it wasn't even a dedicated splitter, go figure.
Old 3rd March 2011
  #10
Gear maniac
 

There is a real danger of forming a hum loop when using two instrument amplifiers - so the best way to deal with this - is to have an audio isolating transformer in the feed to ONE of the amplifiers.

Transformers will be totally transparent - especially if fed from a low impedance source, such as the output from a Boss pedal for example.

Never remove protective mains earths, or grounds, to solve hum problems.
Old 3rd March 2011
  #11
Banned
 

Dont use a stero out Boss pedal! They are not true bypass and they rape your tone.

If you want to try a stereo effect pedal, try a TC Chorus or something with true bypass.
TK
Old 3rd March 2011
  #12
Gear maniac
 
Murasamee's Avatar
 

Lehle

Get this:

Lehle P-Split

or this:

Lehle Little Dual

These Lehle units are one of the best investments I have ever made for my studio. Fully featured (phase inverter and ground lift buttons) and it really cleans up your sound! I can't recommend these enough.

You will thank me.
Old 3rd March 2011
  #13
Gear nut
 
Mild's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd View Post
Dont use a stero out Boss pedal! They are not true bypass and they rape your tone.

If you want to try a stereo effect pedal, try a TC Chorus or something with true bypass.
TK
That's rot. Boss pedals have great buffers, they're just fine. Love the PN-2 call above - one of the coolest old Boss units out there. Kevin Shields can't be wrong... pretty sure his tone does the raping, too - not the other way around.

If you're down for another suggestion on a high-quality dual box with isolation transformers, you can't beat a Lehle Little Dual for quality. They also have a ground lift and phase reverse switch. I love mine for recording sessions - the buffer is good enough to drive the cable a good, long way.

EDIT - this didn't post the first time, so I just did it again now - and I see the post above mine! Took the words right from my mouth.
Old 3rd March 2011
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mild View Post
That's rot. Boss pedals have great buffers, they're just fine.
Buffers are not true bypass
Old 3rd March 2011
  #15
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Mazidawg's Avatar
 

I use a Lehle Dual. The Little Dual will do the trick too. The Dual is MIDI programmable, which may be overkill for this application. Both products have a very high quality isolating transformer in the B output, phase invert, and ground lift. I don't want to fuel the fire of the true bypass argument, but a good buffer, (empasis on GOOD) really opens up a lot of signal routing options without sucking the tone out of the guitar.
Old 4th March 2011
  #16
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Mild's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Real MC View Post
Buffers are not true bypass
Build an entirely true-bypass pedalboard then tell me how you get on. I was responding to the "rape your tone" section of his comment.

You need a good buffered pedal to drive signal. All that cable length adds up. Boss pedals can vary in bypass quality - but the older ones I've found to have quite pleasing buffers. PN-2, DD-2/3/5, PS-2/3, DM-2/3, even my DD-20's bypass is fine.

People get too wound up about true bypass. As a guy who's been "there and back" with the boutique pedal craze - just trust your ears. If it sounds good, then it's good. If it sounds bad, then eq you're bloody amp and move the mic.
Old 26th October 2011
  #17
Gear interested
 

I have an Apex AB-Y. I want to run two gtrs into one amp. My lap steel and regular electric. The volumes on either guitar control the volume on the other gtr. It doesnt switch back and forth between the two they are both on and full volume for either to send signal. Why?
Old 26th October 2011
  #18
TRA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd View Post
Dont use a stero out Boss pedal! They are not true bypass and they rape your tone.

If you want to try a stereo effect pedal, try a TC Chorus or something with true bypass.
TK

True bypass is somewhat of a crock. Buffered pedals like Boss units don't to anything of the sort. String together a bunch of true bypass pedals and then talk to me about your "tone".

True bypass has it's place, but a pedal board full of true bypass pedals without having a buffer driving the front end will "rape your tone" while a buffered bypass pedal won't.
Old 26th October 2011
  #19
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TRA View Post
True bypass is somewhat of a crock. Buffered pedals like Boss units don't to anything of the sort. String together a bunch of true bypass pedals and then talk to me about your "tone".

True bypass has it's place, but a pedal board full of true bypass pedals without having a buffer driving the front end will "rape your tone" while a buffered bypass pedal won't.
Also, there's no such thing as a true bypass pedal with a stereo out unless:

1) It also has a stereo input
2) One of the outputs doesn't have any signal in bypass mode
or
3) The two outputs are wired together in bypass mode, in which case you might as well get a 'Y' cord and spare the expense of a new pedal.
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