DB25 Soldering Tips?
Old 22nd June 2009
  #61
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Old 5th January 2010
  #62
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Im about to solder a db25 for my DAC.

The male db25 connector I have has no indication to what pins are hot, cold and ground. How do I know?
Old 5th January 2010
  #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazelmossobrien View Post
Im about to solder a db25 for my DAC.

The male db25 connector I have has no indication to what pins are hot, cold and ground. How do I know?
The Tascam standard is the most common diagram for DB25 eight channel analog connections. I would check with the mfg of your DAC to verify that they follow this standard.
Attached Thumbnails
DB25 Soldering Tips?-tech_db25_pinout_1_.jpg  
Old 5th January 2010
  #64
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Thanks Rick! you're on top of it around here! thumbsup
Old 5th January 2010
  #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazelmossobrien View Post
Thanks Rick! you're on top of it around here! thumbsup
Hey, i was just thinking about you today! I got in some expandable sheathing that was smaller than I expected and your thread came to my mind. I had to do the finger "dance" to get it on, and realized I had always used a slightly larger size before that was so much easier! Anyway, I would do a "push" then "pinch and release" move that moved the sheathing about an inch per move. Slow but once I got it down it moved along quicker. From now on I'm going back to the bigger size that basically just slides on!
Old 6th January 2010
  #66
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haha! I actually just picked up some expandable nylon one size up from what I had that I think will slide on better. I'm going to try it with this DB25 project.
Old 10th September 2010
  #67
Thumbs up

Bumping an old thread.

I'm about to embark on a serious DB25 crimping mission to wire up my patchbays.

Couple of questions...

1. How is this crimping tool 475 dollars???
Digi-Key - L17D440SP-ND (Manufacturer - L17D440SP)

2. Can I get a cheaper crimper (MUCH cheaper) and use it with the Amphenol components I'm finding on digikey?

3. Anybody have any recommended components they use for their db25 assemblies? Part numbers helpful! There's so much to wade through it's hard to tell sometimes on these sites what's what.

4. Metal housings are recommended over plastic and metalized plastic, correct?

Thanks for any help!

Cheers!
Old 15th September 2010
  #68
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Lee Cardan's Avatar
 

sorry just a quick reply to this, maybe it's been mentioned already

since the wiring ends up as GND HOT COLD GND HOT COLD etc or whatever, the ground's on a single row are to far apart you really don't need to worry about them touching (so long as you strip the channel insulator down minimal, maybe 15 mm, 20 max)

so really, you're only concern in shorting from row to row, ie 1-13 shorting with something on 12-25

so I just put a piece of cardboard in there between the two rows to stop that from ever happening
Old 15th September 2010
  #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rollmottle View Post
Bumping an old thread.

I'm about to embark on a serious DB25 crimping mission to wire up my patchbays.

Couple of questions...

1. How is this crimping tool 475 dollars???
Digi-Key - L17D440SP-ND (Manufacturer - L17D440SP)

2. Can I get a cheaper crimper (MUCH cheaper) and use it with the Amphenol components I'm finding on digikey?

3. Anybody have any recommended components they use for their db25 assemblies? Part numbers helpful! There's so much to wade through it's hard to tell sometimes on these sites what's what.

4. Metal housings are recommended over plastic and metalized plastic, correct?

Thanks for any help!

Cheers!
go to eBay for that stuff. I have an old AMP tool similar to this one:

crimp tool

and it really does make life faster and less error prone (and easier on the hands and less wasted pins with bad crimps)

Other things to watch for - if you get the long thumbscrews to attach the DB-25 to the bay, make sure there's enough clearance and that the parts all line up well, otherwise you'll be cross-threading the receiving holes or bending things or...
Old 17th September 2010
  #70
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Eons ago, I had a d-sub crimp tool made by Sargent that looked a lot like the one in the Ebay listing, above. A quick check shows it is model 3127CT and I found it priced under $100 (new) from a Google search.

IIRC, Paladin also makes a crimper for disub pins as well.

Best,

Bri
Old 30th December 2010
  #71
Hey all, I'm about to start a 46+ dsub cable job and just wanted to thank everyone for contributing to this thread. I didn't even think of crimping! I've got some pretty good solder chops, but I've never used a crimper.

Does anyone have any other pics they could post? I like to learn with visuals.

Also, does anyone know what company supplies mogami with their dsub connectors? They look really nice!

MOGAMI® - Gold DB25-DB25 (10, 15, 20, 25, 30 or 50 ft)
Old 9th January 2011
  #72
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I'm about to start a Dsub project myself. What type of crimp pin do you guys recommend for Mogami cable (I've already got the cable)? Gold or silver pins? I've got 15 or so db25 connections to make so crimping certainly sounds faster.

Oh, if you screw up, what does it take to removed a crimp pin? Anything special?
Old 16th October 2012
  #73
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i'm looking at db25 crimp style connectors and it looks like just a bunch of holes. is there anything to keep the pins seated and fully protruding? I worry that they would get pushed into the hood and make intermittent connections with the opposing connector.

also, do you use the same crimp pins for hd26 connectors? having a hard time finding info on this. (making cables for the lynx AES16).
Old 17th October 2012
  #74
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The pins (both male and female) have little "barbs" on the sides which catch on a ridge inside each hole in the insulator block. Once you push them in, they are very difficult to push or pull out (and it ruins the pin). They make "extractor tools" which are thin metal tubes that you can insert into the insulator block to release the pin "barbs". This is the common tool for D-sub connectors...



Here is an interesting web page on D-sub pin extraction...
AeroElectric Connection - D-Sub Pin Extraction

You cannot assume that all pins are the same, even from the same manufacturer. Always refer to the manufacturer's recommendation for the proper male and female pins for a particular connector.

Note also that the crimping tool is a significant investment and that cost makes crimping not a viable option for many projects.
Quote
1
Old 24th October 2012
  #75
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can anyone recommend part numbers for connectors that i could find reasonably priced and maybe where i would get them?
Old 27th December 2012
  #76
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Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness View Post
You basically got it right.
We bend the stripped strands back over the jacket, but we DO NOT solder the wire before crimping.
you bend ALL of the stripped strands back over the jacket? if so, does that mean you still use the same contact gauge? what does this approach do, compensate for the flexibility of mogami somehow?

on the topic of gauge, I'm trying to reuse some old mogami 8ch analog i have, but I can't confirm the gauge. There is no part number on the insulation. Please take a look and tell me if you know what it is:
Attached Thumbnails
DB25 Soldering Tips?-innersulation.jpg   DB25 Soldering Tips?-mogamilogo.jpg  
Old 27th December 2012
  #77
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I cannot tell what gauge that wire is from the low-res photo to attached.

Trail and error, my friend.

Do some tests and see where you stand.

I'm sorry I could not be more helpful.

Perhaps, others can chime in with some solid advice.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BoseBoyz View Post
you bend ALL of the stripped strands back over the jacket? if so, does that mean you still use the same contact gauge? what does this approach do, compensate for the flexibility of mogami somehow?

on the topic of gauge, I'm trying to reuse some old mogami 8ch analog i have, but I can't confirm the gauge. There is no part number on the insulation. Please take a look and tell me if you know what it is:
Old 28th December 2012
  #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness View Post
We find that crimping with gold contacts is much more reliable and an efficient way of building snakes and harnesses.
have you had worse experience with the non-gold contacts? I can find db25 contacts in full gold plate no prob, but the hd26 contacts seem like they only come with gold tips, and the crimpable area is just nickle. gold is more malleable, so i would think that would crimp differently than nickel.
Old 28th December 2012
  #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsoukup View Post
crimp?
For real.
Old 28th December 2012
  #80
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Remoteness's Avatar
I never used the nickle contacts, so I cannot answer your question with any realtime experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BoseBoyz View Post
have you had worse experience with the non-gold contacts? I can find db25 contacts in full gold plate no prob, but the hd26 contacts seem like they only come with gold tips, and the crimpable area is just nickle. gold is more malleable, so i would think that would crimp differently than nickel.
Old 29th December 2012
  #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoseBoyz View Post
have you had worse experience with the non-gold contacts? I can find db25 contacts in full gold plate no prob, but the hd26 contacts seem like they only come with gold tips, and the crimpable area is just nickle. gold is more malleable, so i would think that would crimp differently than nickel.
There are no solid-gold connector pins. They are all gold-plated over some more robust (and reasonably-priced) metal alloy. Not only is solid gold too soft for the purpose, but it is also bloody expensive. At US$1650 per ounce, are you paying several hundred dollars per pin? No, I didn't think so.
Old 29th December 2012
  #82
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i was using gold as short hand for gold plated. still trying to figure out if gold plating offers any advantage on the crimp tab side of the contact
Old 29th December 2012
  #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcrowley View Post
At US$1650 per ounce, are you paying several hundred dollars per pin? No, I didn't think so.
Ouch!
Old 29th December 2012
  #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoseBoyz View Post
i was using gold as short hand for gold plated. still trying to figure out if gold plating offers any advantage on the crimp tab side of the contact
No advantage. A proper crimp connection is "gas tight". That obviates the need for precious metal to preserve conductivity.

OTOH, a mated connector male and female contact are NOT "gas tight", thus the need for either mechanical (occasional wiping, re-insertion, etc.) or chemical (oxidation resistant like gold, or oxidation-agnostic like silver) protection of the contact.

The gold plating is only a few microns thick. It has no affect on the maleability of the contact pin. OTOH, using the incorrect crimping die will produce a crimp that is not long-term robust. Just another reason I prefer solder-cup, even for loose, insertable pins. Unless you are doing hundreds and thousands of connections (like Mr. Remote) and you have the proper tooling and expertise to produce reliable connections.
Old 29th December 2012
  #85
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Old 29th December 2012
  #86
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There is not enough information on the AMP (actually Tyco Electric) website about that crimping tool. In fact there is NO information about that tool that is revealed by using their search feature. Suggest sending them your question via email.

It is not even clear which kind of crimping tool it is when searching on Google images. Note that many of those kinds of crimp tools have an interchangeable die feature. So it also depends on what die are installed.
Old 1st January 2013
  #87
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Old 1st January 2013
  #88
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Old 1st January 2013
  #89
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i picked up one of those amp 90312-1 crimpers on ebay for $20, but i guess that is for the 'formed' style contacts. People on here seem to be saying to go with machined contacts, but I don't see much being said about WHY. Obviously machined contacts are more expensive to manufacture, but that doesn't always translate into better performance.

(rcrowley, you make a lot of great points on soldering vs crimping, but i'm not very experienced with a soldering iron either, and i've dealt with a lot of cold solder frustration in my gear. plus the only place i have to solder is the garage and it is 5 degrees out there right now. hence, really trying to understand the crimping thing)
Old 2nd January 2013
  #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoseBoyz View Post
People on here seem to be saying to go with machined contacts, but I don't see much being said about WHY. Obviously machined contacts are more expensive to manufacture, but that doesn't always translate into better performance.
The biggest difference is that machined contacts are SOLID while formed contacts are FRAGILE and HOLLOW. If I were making something that was going to be plugged and unplugged a lot OR something that was going to be used for portable equipment out on location, I would MUCH rather have solid pins that are much harder to bend or break. OTOH, if you are talking about something that will be plugged in once every couple of years in the back of a rack, then go for it.

Quote:
but i'm not very experienced with a soldering iron either, and i've dealt with a lot of cold solder frustration in my gear. plus the only place i have to solder is the garage and it is 5 degrees out there right now. hence, really trying to understand the crimping thing)
There's not substitute for learning to solder properly. It isn't really that difficult. Get some old discarded gear and practice. IME, crimping isn't really easier than soldering if it is done properly.
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