Importance of Mix Real Estate
Old 29th December 2013
  #1
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Importance of Mix Real Estate

The instruments themselves in a composing have mix real estate and how they lay in a mix. But let's say you have two instruments with the same frequency spectrum, is there any way to mix them together, both being brought out, without sounding harsh?
Old 29th December 2013
  #2
This question touches on many aspects of the art of arranging as well as mixing.

Given the breadth of sounds available to the electronic musician, picking sounds that fit together - or making them fit through arrangement choices - is one of the key skills we all have to learn.

That said, if you acquire some good compression and EQ tools (whether ITB or OTB), they can absolve some sins in this area. When you have multiple tracks you want to bring out that share a similar frequency range, you should definitely consider compressing both so you can more precisely control how they sit together.

It's not electronic music, but I learned a lot from studying Chris Lord-Alge's mixing style. I used to think compression killed dynamics and therefore was the enemy of expression but CLA has done some ultra compressed rock mixes that I think sound great (Green Day's American Idiot in particular). Those mixes include a lot of overlapping frequency content and manage to have big drums, big guitars, big bass and big vox at the same time. Check out some videos with him discussing his techniques and I think you'll get some ideas about how to manage this issue.
Old 29th December 2013
  #3
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harness's Avatar
arrangement, panning, different timbre
Old 29th December 2013
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chillytc View Post
This question touches on many aspects of the art of arranging as well as mixing.

Given the breadth of sounds available to the electronic musician, picking sounds that fit together - or making them fit through arrangement choices - is one of the key skills we all have to learn.

That said, if you acquire some good compression and EQ tools (whether ITB or OTB), they can absolve some sins in this area. When you have multiple tracks you want to bring out that share a similar frequency range, you should definitely consider compressing both so you can more precisely control how they sit together.

It's not electronic music, but I learned a lot from studying Chris Lord-Alge's mixing style. I used to think compression killed dynamics and therefore was the enemy of expression but CLA has done some ultra compressed rock mixes that I think sound great (Green Day's American Idiot in particular). Those mixes include a lot of overlapping frequency content and manage to have big drums, big guitars, big bass and big vox at the same time. Check out some videos with him discussing his techniques and I think you'll get some ideas about how to manage this issue.
I have used eq to death trying to get things to fit... but never thought of compression. My views are simialar to what yours were, killing dynamics, but I will definitely give it a try.
Old 29th December 2013
  #5
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Odds are, it's an arrangement issue.

Not trying to be harsh, but that's the problem usually if some EQ doesn't separate them out easily.
Old 29th December 2013
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donsolo View Post
Odds are, it's an arrangement issue.

Not trying to be harsh, but that's the problem usually if some EQ doesn't separate them out easily.
Not harsh, I thought that was the case anyway.
Old 30th December 2013
  #7
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Update, the compression recommendation worked beautifully. Really brought out a solo I had that otherwise raising the volume wouldn't fix.
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