Login / Register
 
Getting that gritty analog sound.
New Reply
Subscribe
shaolinsoul
Thread Starter
#1
25th March 2009
Old 25th March 2009
  #1
Gear Head
 
shaolinsoul's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 52

Thread Starter
shaolinsoul is offline
Getting that gritty analog sound.

Hey guys,

Ive been making techno/electronic music for about two years now strictly on FL Studio (and a ton of vst's) and an RS7000 from the arraging to final mixdown stage. Im always finding out that a lot of my mixdowns are sounding a lot like other producers (i.e. very clean and dry) especially at the club and want to find how to get it to have more punch.

here is an example of a "sound" i am trying to emulate.

YouTube - Suburban Knight - The Worlds

Im interested in how to "warm" up my sound and can only see analog outboard as an answer here in particular an old sampler or fx unit that can give me that raw texture in the sound I want.

So what are some essential outboard gear that can give the sound some color while arranging and mixing in the DAW?

thx.
#2
25th March 2009
Old 25th March 2009
  #2
Lives for gear
 
The Architecture's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 1,013

Send a message via AIM to The Architecture Send a message via Yahoo to The Architecture
The Architecture is offline
to my ears it sounds very digital some of the sounds, like sampled, the most analog thing would be the TR909. It doesnt sound that great plain, it needs processing to make it sounds better, like compression. I think the secret was they recorded on Reel to Reel, probably prosumer stuff my guess, im not sure.

If you want that sound, get a cheap tape machine, like a old Tascam 32b, and have fun!
__________________
"if your an engineer you know how important it is to have good looking knobs" Dave Pensado
#3
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,882

rockmanrock is offline
This is where we've got to, super clean soft synths generated inside a DAW with no noise or distortion whatsoever unless you add it in on purpose. It's a totally different overall sound, even if your choice of synth sounds is close.

They used real synths and drum machines, a real analogue mixing desk, first generation digital effects with lots of artifacts and as mentioned above, probably recorded/mastered onto tape, even 4 track cassette based for a lot of stuff. You're also listening to the sound of vinyl there, probably a well used 12".

The sound is a combination of all that stuff so working out which bit contributes most to the sound is not straight-forward. You could get a multi-output sound card, an analogue mixing desk and some outboard. Alternatively, for the price of a fancy sound card you could get some real synths, something like a TX81Z or DX something, maybe a cheap analogue poly such as a Korg Poly 800.

Cheap FX I'd recommend would be: Yamaha REX50, Midiverb 1 or 2, old delay racks with knobs on (Effectron, Boss micro rack series).
#4
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #4
Lives for gear
 
analogbass's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 874

analogbass is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockmanrock View Post
This is where we've got to, super clean soft synths generated inside a DAW with no noise or distortion whatsoever unless you add it in on purpose. It's a totally different overall sound, even if your choice of synth sounds is close.

They used real synths and drum machines, a real analogue mixing desk, first generation digital effects with lots of artifacts and as mentioned above, probably recorded/mastered onto tape, even 4 track cassette based for a lot of stuff. You're also listening to the sound of vinyl there, probably a well used 12".

The sound is a combination of all that stuff so working out which bit contributes most to the sound is not straight-forward. You could get a multi-output sound card, an analogue mixing desk and some outboard. Alternatively, for the price of a fancy sound card you could get some real synths, something like a TX81Z or DX something, maybe a cheap analogue poly such as a Korg Poly 800.

Cheap FX I'd recommend would be: Yamaha REX50, Midiverb 1 or 2, old delay racks with knobs on (Effectron, Boss micro rack series).

Ya you can approximate this by filling in some of your chain with analogish type sounds not generated by software-for example use a Nord and some convincing and punchier old drum samples along with some good EQ and F/X like the reverb heard there.

Or just use some of the original hardware which often sounds warmer and punchier than software. That includes older keys, in the case of this track early digital like Casio CZ, Yamaha DX or Korg 800/8000, a Mirage or Sequential sampler, etc. That's the main thing; the effect can be further emphasized if necessary by running it thru one of the older dirtier sounding mixers and/or capturing it in analog mediums like tape/vinyl.

As i said you can do some or all of this with newer anolog type devices, but in general (with some exceptions) the older stuff has the punch and dirt more than the newer stuff that tends to be clean and polite relatively speaking even when technically similar. That's why some of the drum samplers are still desirable and are something else you could consider, something like an MPC-60 or SP-12 in lieu of an old drum machine-either/or.
#5
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #5
Lives for gear
 
Popbott's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: Texas by way of Pluto
Posts: 2,011
My Recordings/Credits

Popbott is offline
Want to warm up your digital ITB sound? I agree with the above posts, get some older synths in general in there. They don't have to be expensive $3K synths either. Ensoniq ESQ-1, any of the Roland Juno's, Yamaha DX synths, Korg DW-6000, 8000, Casio CZ series, Sequential Circuits Six Track, Prophet 600, Akai AX-60, 80, loads to choose from to add some analog sounding goodness. An older sampler like some of the Akai S series and Ensoniq ESQ or ASR-10 series of samplers can also add some analog simulated saturation. The next logical step after getting some outboard is to get an older analog mixing console and beef it up!!!
__________________
PopBott
#6
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #6
Lives for gear
 
analogbass's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 874

analogbass is offline
Just a note on the above: the digi-synths already mentioned will sound like that track, which is a classic example of 80s-90s house-early digi-synths emulating analog. Using a 600 or Korg 8000 gets you to a higher level of rawness and fullness than on that record, for those who care.

#7
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #7
Gear interested
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: London
Posts: 4

fraserboy is offline
Any idea on the synths that might be lurking in those studios of Larry heard and Theo Parrish. Love that sound!!!
shaolinsoul
Thread Starter
#8
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #8
Gear Head
 
shaolinsoul's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 52

Thread Starter
shaolinsoul is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockmanrock View Post
This is where we've got to, super clean soft synths generated inside a DAW with no noise or distortion whatsoever unless you add it in on purpose. It's a totally different overall sound, even if your choice of synth sounds is close.

They used real synths and drum machines, a real analogue mixing desk, first generation digital effects with lots of artifacts and as mentioned above, probably recorded/mastered onto tape, even 4 track cassette based for a lot of stuff. You're also listening to the sound of vinyl there, probably a well used 12".

The sound is a combination of all that stuff so working out which bit contributes most to the sound is not straight-forward. You could get a multi-output sound card, an analogue mixing desk and some outboard. Alternatively, for the price of a fancy sound card you could get some real synths, something like a TX81Z or DX something, maybe a cheap analogue poly such as a Korg Poly 800.

Cheap FX I'd recommend would be: Yamaha REX50, Midiverb 1 or 2, old delay racks with knobs on (Effectron, Boss micro rack series).
What is a multi output soundcard? So an analogue mixing is definately a good deal huh? I was thinking if I sampled lots of my old records (i.e. disco breaks, 909 hits, pads etc..) into FL Studio, than that could do the job for me right? I really agree vst synth's sound TERRIBLE very thin and plastic like.
shaolinsoul
Thread Starter
#9
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #9
Gear Head
 
shaolinsoul's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 52

Thread Starter
shaolinsoul is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Popbott View Post
Want to warm up your digital ITB sound? I agree with the above posts, get some older synths in general in there. They don't have to be expensive $3K synths either. Ensoniq ESQ-1, any of the Roland Juno's, Yamaha DX synths, Korg DW-6000, 8000, Casio CZ series, Sequential Circuits Six Track, Prophet 600, Akai AX-60, 80, loads to choose from to add some analog sounding goodness. An older sampler like some of the Akai S series and Ensoniq ESQ or ASR-10 series of samplers can also add some analog simulated saturation. The next logical step after getting some outboard is to get an older analog mixing console and beef it up!!!
Hey thats awesome man!

Im really interested in all of those and there floating around ebay at decent prices too. Anyways my question is does recording your music from an anlaog source such as those synth into a program like FL Studio or Cubase as audio effect the sound at all? I know ill need a A/D converter for this. And how important is the analog mixing console.
I also see this is how a lot of music from the 90's was recorded i.e. heavily outboard and just a basic sequecing program.

So the outboard gear in FL Studio i.e. fruity reverb, compressor, balance etc..cant hold there own against the Lexicon and Alesis FX units. I personally think Fruity reverb is terrible.
#10
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #10
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,882

rockmanrock is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by shaolinsoul View Post
What is a multi output soundcard? So an analogue mixing is definately a good deal huh? I was thinking if I sampled lots of my old records (i.e. disco breaks, 909 hits, pads etc..) into FL Studio, than that could do the job for me right? I really agree vst synth's sound TERRIBLE very thin and plastic like.

A multi-output soundcard or interface would be a way of getting say 8 analogue channels of sound from your computer, plug that into an analogue mixer then you could mix and use hardware effects on sends/inserts etc. Those interfaces can get quite pricey though which is why I suggested getting some hardware synths. Computer stuff devalues incredibly quickly too, and s/h hardware synths are ridiculously cheap now if you avoid the 'collectable' stuff.

Sampling things will get you closer but I find samples can be a bit limited. We're into the realms of personal preference with all this, some people make complete albums with nothing but samples. For Detroit style techno, actual synths would be my preference.

VST synths seem to have come a long way, I've heard some great demos of things like Sylenth (?) and Synth Squad. A bunch of those mixed in a DAW will sound pretty different to Suburban Knight though.
#11
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #11
Gear maniac
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Posts: 250

krisstoff is offline
Yeah for these kind of tracks they scream yamaha DX, Junos, alpha juno,moog prodigy, TR707,727,909 and Akai samplers all pushed trough a average desk like a mackie or somthing like that. A couple of DBX 160xt and you sholuld be about there.
#12
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #12
Lives for gear
 
tribeofenki's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Soundscapes
Posts: 1,811

tribeofenki is offline
Agree 100% with rockmanrock

That's the difference from DAW and a Home Studio.
#13
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #13
Lives for gear
 
wax808's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,482

wax808 is offline
Shaolinsoul:


You are getting some good advice here. I'm not sure how much money you have to throw all this together. Even once you do there is going to be a significant learning curve.

Lets try and make this 100x simpler and much more accessible. Like "this weekend" accessible!!


Get on your local craigslist and get yourself a cheap Tascam Portastudio or some other 4-track cassette recorder. You will probably spend 50-100 bucks on it. With this you will be ready to start looking for that sound.

Then look at getting something like a Roland Alpha Juno maybe a Juno 60. Ensoniq ESQ-1 or something along those lines. Expect to spend 200-400 bucks.

Forget about MIDI sync, forget about sidechaining, all that extra baggage. Record a beat to one or two tracks for a few minutes. Then rewind, hook up the synth and play live over the beats. If you have a nice enough recorder with 4 seperate inputs you could do it all at once if you wanted to just capture a sequence.

Obviously this is very simple. But you will recording straight to analog, and you would be surprised how good those old cassettes can sound. It wont cost you much, and you can start right away.

Making music with the least path of resistance in mind is very liberating.
#14
26th March 2009
Old 26th March 2009
  #14
Lives for gear
 
analogbass's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 874

analogbass is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by krisstoff View Post
Yeah for these kind of tracks they scream yamaha DX, Junos, alpha juno,moog prodigy, TR707,727,909 and Akai samplers all pushed trough a average desk like a mackie or somthing like that. A couple of DBX 160xt and you sholuld be about there.
Not alot of a lot of top vintage like Oberheim, Moog or Sequential, because those things cost too much especially adding in the cost of syncing to midi, which was unusual and expensive to do then. Not much Akai either, other than a 612 or a Mirage/Casio sampler for the most part. Primarily 80s digi-synths and some tier-b late generation analog/digital japanese synths like junos and roland drum machines that weren't expensive to buy and already had midi to use in sequencing, which was essential to those productions.

Most of those guys didn't buy those particular boards because they were the best sounding but rather because they were dirt cheap, had fallen out of favor and had midi, all appealing to guys with no money and often not much in the way of chops. That's why those 80s and 90s sounds are essentially cheap (but gritty and powerful by today's standards).


Quote:
Any idea on the synths that might be lurking in those studios of Larry heard and Theo Parrish. Love that sound!!!
Same idea; Heard if memory serves used a Juno 60/106 and Jupiter 6. No great sounds generated, the Mr. Fingers stuff was just good music rather than having outstanding sounds or production values. .
#15
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #15
Lives for gear
 
The Architecture's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 1,013

Send a message via AIM to The Architecture Send a message via Yahoo to The Architecture
The Architecture is offline
LOTS of truth found on this thread. This is the least slutty post I have seen yet on GS, and I give it a total thumbs up!

The only expensive thing you'd need is the 909, then everything else is SUPER cheap. Or you can skip the 909 and get a decent akai sampler. Akai to me is the techno sampler of choice back then.

Funny thing too. people like paul van dyke, i think were almost entirely sample based, his drums sounded soo aliased, like Humate and Visions of Shiva.

Get that 4 track and get busy! its how I got my start into hardware.

Dont let this whole high end bull honky get in your way. If you just go with it, and use what you got, you will be a better man for it. Its better than sitting here all day talking about what synth is better than this or how vintage analog is better than new analog blah blah blah!

JUST....
MAKE....
MUSIC!!!!

there. Had to get that one off my chest.
#16
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #16
Lives for gear
 
Popbott's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: Texas by way of Pluto
Posts: 2,011
My Recordings/Credits

Popbott is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by shaolinsoul View Post
Hey thats awesome man!

Im really interested in all of those and there floating around ebay at decent prices too. Anyways my question is does recording your music from an anlaog source such as those synth into a program like FL Studio or Cubase as audio effect the sound at all? I know ill need a A/D converter for this. And how important is the analog mixing console.
I also see this is how a lot of music from the 90's was recorded i.e. heavily outboard and just a basic sequecing program.

So the outboard gear in FL Studio i.e. fruity reverb, compressor, balance etc..cant hold there own against the Lexicon and Alesis FX units. I personally think Fruity reverb is terrible.
Thanks shaolonsoul, and that is a good question. Recording into any DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) of your choice will determine how it will sound as they all sound different to one another. Protools LE sounds different than Steinberg's Nuendo, as does Cubase to Logic. The one constant that should remain the same and is a huge factor is your A/D converter of choice which will also determine how your synths will sound in your DAW. I like to track my synths into Protools with different preamps, many times, borrowing from friends for a weekend and so on.

I like to mix audio tracks out from PT and out from all of my syths to an analog mixing console and then back into PT for a final 2 track mix. I prefer the sound of an outboard console on most of my synths and samplers. I usually use my DAW for sequencing and recording things like vocals and guitar. So, I would say using an outboard console is important to my workflow as I primarily like to use outboard synths/samplers. My primary reason for using an outboard console is because the summing of tracks in Protools LE for a final mix does not sound as good as my console. My console sounds much bigger, I get better separation, a better low end response and it just sounds more real to me.

If you have never used outboard gear to mix, remember, plug-ins are imitating outboard gear. The experience of using outboard gear will give you a greater understanding on how to accurately use your ITB plug-in effects and utilize them correctly to get the sounds you are looking for. I definitely recommend trying some outboard effects just for the experience.
#17
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #17
Lives for gear
 
crufty's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Home Enthusiasm
Posts: 5,224

crufty is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Architecture View Post

Get that 4 track and get busy! its how I got my start into hardware.
This is a great idea. I think I may partake myself!

Keep in mind shaolin, this could be the most expensive $50 you ever spend as you start down the journey of sluttiness.
#18
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #18
Moderator
 
Reptil's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: in a low orbit
Posts: 21,596

Reptil is offline
whoa the compression algo on this youtube video is really bad* (no bass! ) (-also there's a scratch at 5.46 but that's not so important)
* compared to the original

still love "The Art of Stalking" thumbsup - it was like spaceship travel back then - so different, alien, demanding attention.

How to get "this" sound?
I don't think that's diffficult.
Playing this, it isn't a really "loud" record, lots of hiss and noise in there. The sounds are just so well chosen, they just work with each other. Unrelated to this production, but with my own stuff, instead of making it more messy I always tried to clean up stuff. cursing the desk for the noise. Funny how that goes.

Use a musical source (good synths, and percussion, not some secondhand mp3 loop), and then mix through an old desk. You could get there using some eqs or filters, too. Tape is good too for this type sound. See the "Omar S" thread, for some idea on it. Also I heard the Harrison plugin of UAD. While a bit too "shiny" sounding, the musicallity of something like that (or the real thing) coupled with some very careful noise adding can get you also very close.Also this is a vinyl rip, isn't it? So look for the characteristics of vinyl.
(cut everything above 16K with a soft 12db curve is a start)

I think it's more how you approach something than the tools, you can do anything in a lot of different ways.
I'm a total slut, and would rather not eat for a week than have less gear, but there is no "do everything" box.
Maybe this sounds corny to you, and not the answer you're looking for, but note that the gear used back then was a lot less good than stuff many of us use right now.

For a killer combo, get a small good quality analogue desk, one good versitile compressor (also usable in stereo) and one really good outboard eq.
And go from there. Regardless of using software or hardware, don't go for too many plugs or machines. It will distract from the purpose of the song, if you're not careful.
Also, gear wise -- go for high quality stuff. It is better, makes things sound better, and is cheaper in the long run. But for this "sound" you just need your ears, and good monitors that don't lie (flatter).
__________________
"You must have Chaos within you, to give Birth to a dancing Star" Friedrich Nietzsche

for sale EURORACK MODULAR CASE


#19
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #19
Lives for gear
 
The Architecture's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 1,013

Send a message via AIM to The Architecture Send a message via Yahoo to The Architecture
The Architecture is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by crufty View Post
This is a great idea. I think I may partake myself!

Keep in mind shaolin, this could be the most expensive $50 you ever spend as you start down the journey of sluttiness.
i think a good start for you would be

4 track
DSI Mopho (for analog needs)
Roland JD990
JP8000
Akai S1000 (these things are stupid cheap)
a casio
and what else you feel like getting.
a Alesis MMT8 would be a good investement as well. its a great first midi sequencer. I have one I could sell you too, as Im not using mine anymore. But I have no power supply, so youd have to source that yourself.

Heres some then (2005) and nows (2009) pictures of my setup

my first setup cost 540 dollars in 2004. It was...

JVC tape deck
S612
AX60
Korg EA1
Korg ER1
Behringer 6 channel mixer.

That was my setup in 2004. all I can say is, my recordings sound super analog, and super lo-fi from this time period.

SoundClick artist: The Beat Junkey - A All Genre Group, No particular style

My first hardware track (10/25/04) Casio MT18 drums, AX60 for pad. and JVC tape deck. With some soundforge processing.
Attached Thumbnails
Getting that gritty analog sound.-89290165_l.jpg   Getting that gritty analog sound.-imga0074.jpg   Getting that gritty analog sound.-imga0072.jpg  
#20
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #20
Gear nut
 
Electronica03's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 101

Electronica03 is offline
I haven't read any of the other replies, but this youtube link sounds like a shitty rip from an essential mix....ya dig
shaolinsoul
Thread Starter
#21
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #21
Gear Head
 
shaolinsoul's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 52

Thread Starter
shaolinsoul is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by wax808 View Post
Shaolinsoul:


You are getting some good advice here. I'm not sure how much money you have to throw all this together. Even once you do there is going to be a significant learning curve.

Lets try and make this 100x simpler and much more accessible. Like "this weekend" accessible!!


Get on your local craigslist and get yourself a cheap Tascam Portastudio or some other 4-track cassette recorder. You will probably spend 50-100 bucks on it. With this you will be ready to start looking for that sound.

Then look at getting something like a Roland Alpha Juno maybe a Juno 60. Ensoniq ESQ-1 or something along those lines. Expect to spend 200-400 bucks.

Forget about MIDI sync, forget about sidechaining, all that extra baggage. Record a beat to one or two tracks for a few minutes. Then rewind, hook up the synth and play live over the beats. If you have a nice enough recorder with 4 seperate inputs you could do it all at once if you wanted to just capture a sequence.

Obviously this is very simple. But you will recording straight to analog, and you would be surprised how good those old cassettes can sound. It wont cost you much, and you can start right away.

Making music with the least path of resistance in mind is very liberating.
Wow, I didnt mean that gritty but It looks like A LOT of fun. Tape is something im very interested in but wouldnt you need to arrange your song in a DAW then from mixing board to tape or do you intend to play everything live?
shaolinsoul
Thread Starter
#22
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #22
Gear Head
 
shaolinsoul's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 52

Thread Starter
shaolinsoul is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reptil View Post
whoa the compression algo on this youtube video is really bad* (no bass! ) (-also there's a scratch at 5.46 but that's not so important)
* compared to the original

still love "The Art of Stalking" thumbsup - it was like spaceship travel back then - so different, alien, demanding attention.

How to get "this" sound?
I don't think that's diffficult.
Playing this, it isn't a really "loud" record, lots of hiss and noise in there. The sounds are just so well chosen, they just work with each other. Unrelated to this production, but with my own stuff, instead of making it more messy I always tried to clean up stuff. cursing the desk for the noise. Funny how that goes.

Use a musical source (good synths, and percussion, not some secondhand mp3 loop), and then mix through an old desk. You could get there using some eqs or filters, too. Tape is good too for this type sound. See the "Omar S" thread, for some idea on it. Also I heard the Harrison plugin of UAD. While a bit too "shiny" sounding, the musicallity of something like that (or the real thing) coupled with some very careful noise adding can get you also very close.Also this is a vinyl rip, isn't it? So look for the characteristics of vinyl.
(cut everything above 16K with a soft 12db curve is a start)

I think it's more how you approach something than the tools, you can do anything in a lot of different ways.
I'm a total slut, and would rather not eat for a week than have less gear, but there is no "do everything" box.
Maybe this sounds corny to you, and not the answer you're looking for, but note that the gear used back then was a lot less good than stuff many of us use right now.

For a killer combo, get a small good quality analogue desk, one good versitile compressor (also usable in stereo) and one really good outboard eq.
And go from there. Regardless of using software or hardware, don't go for too many plugs or machines. It will distract from the purpose of the song, if you're not careful.
Also, gear wise -- go for high quality stuff. It is better, makes things sound better, and is cheaper in the long run. But for this "sound" you just need your ears, and good monitors that don't lie (flatter).
Yep excellent, any ideas on a good out board eq?

Also so I really need the DAW environment to compose or arrange in. I used to have a rs7000 but still dont want to rule out cubase or logic.

And good point about using good samples. I will usually start by sampling a break from a disco or funk record and layer up a fat 909 and maybe an 808 sub with the attack slightly off.
shaolinsoul
Thread Starter
#23
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #23
Gear Head
 
shaolinsoul's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 52

Thread Starter
shaolinsoul is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by crufty View Post
This is a great idea. I think I may partake myself!

Keep in mind shaolin, this could be the most expensive $50 you ever spend as you start down the journey of sluttiness.
well im looking for a $50 rig with a $1000 sound...
And would recording to tape cause a lot of background hiss? Im just scared of how something like that would sound in a club.
shaolinsoul
Thread Starter
#24
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #24
Gear Head
 
shaolinsoul's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 52

Thread Starter
shaolinsoul is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reptil View Post
whoa the compression algo on this youtube video is really bad* (no bass! ) (-also there's a scratch at 5.46 but that's not so important)
* compared to the original

still love "The Art of Stalking" thumbsup - it was like spaceship travel back then - so different, alien, demanding attention.



Ill take that rugged sound anyday As opposed to something like this...YouTube - RUSKO - HAMMERTIME

Thats just ****ing terrible.
#25
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #25
Moderator
 
Reptil's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: in a low orbit
Posts: 21,596

Reptil is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by shaolinsoul View Post
well im looking for a $50 rig with a $1000 sound...
And would recording to tape cause a lot of background hiss? Im just scared of how something like that would sound in a club.
gates are very inexpensive these days. get a drawmer DS-201.
it also has sidechain inputs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by shaolinsoul View Post



Ill take that rugged sound anyday As opposed to something like this...YouTube - RUSKO - HAMMERTIME

Thats just ****ing terrible.
LOL you can say it's a shitty production yes.
what I meant is that youtube rips the upload apart.
in some parts the algorythm clamps down on the track and washes out all the bass. This doesn't happen on the vinyl, from which it was copied.
There are a couple of threads on GS that deal with this.
#26
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #26
Lives for gear
 
wax808's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,482

wax808 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by shaolinsoul View Post
Wow, I didnt mean that gritty but It looks like A LOT of fun. Tape is something im very interested in but wouldnt you need to arrange your song in a DAW then from mixing board to tape or do you intend to play everything live?

You could do something like that. But the workflow I had in mind was more like:


1. Record a simple beat on track 1.

2. Rewind tape, then record a bassline on Track 2.

3. Rewind, Record a lead on track 3.


etc, etc.


That is the most simple way to do it. The way someone might cut a demo with an acoustic guitar and vocals for instance. They might record the guitar part first then the vocals second while listening to the first part.



I've done this with my MPC and a simple Fostex recorder. I recorded a long arpeggio, then went back and manually played some drums, then went back again and put in a lead. It's fast, and fun as hell. It's a good way to get something started without worrying about syncing things up and tracking things out.
#27
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #27
3 + infractions, forum membership suspended.
 
7161's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,096

7161 is offline
i dunno you can get alot of that sound itb if you just get radical and ignore the pointless rules chueck around by farty old engineers from the rock genre - the bassline & drums and the whippy little synth riff all can be itb imo

well you can try it anyways - it's the overall eq and fx quality thats sounding 'analog' - you can try con' verbs tho to get to that, and use some guitar amp modelling to add grit, noise and hiss. It surprises me how few people experiment with amp and cab modelling in electronic music

nasty harsh eq-ing of delay returns etc to get harsher analog sounding delay - roll off everything over 10k on your verbs and delays too, in fact do alot of top-end 'gloss' rolling off cos those old delays and verbs didnt go above that or try some (again) amp modelling unit reverb which imitates old spring verbs etc)

get an emax - 12bit & real analog curtis filters, you can sequence it and record your sequenced parts as audio files - emax makes drums awesomely good and more besides and they are cheap.

checkout some older synth plugins like the sc101
S&C DEVELOP

or the old MDA Maxim JX10


the bass on that track sounds like a softened dx100 - get one (they are cheap & a mainstay of early techno) for that great 4OP subtle 'hiss' you get with each note - often dx100 mini-keys are knackered so just check it triggers via midi over the full range
#28
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #28
Lives for gear
 
crufty's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Home Enthusiasm
Posts: 5,224

crufty is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by shaolinsoul View Post
well im looking for a $50 rig with a $1000 sound...
And would recording to tape cause a lot of background hiss? Im just scared of how something like that would sound in a club.
You didn't mention a budget, but I was assuming it was pretty small. Obviously you can spend a lot more! However, given that you don't have a multi-output audio card (one that can play at least 8 tracks of audio out) there is quite a bit of cost involved, and I at least have no experience with FL studio to say what a good choice would be.

The real point of the 4 track is that they are very easy to come by, you can record to them using your existing setup (just need a cable from your cpu to casette) and they have op-amps that you can overdrive. One way to really add color to songs is to slightly overdrive analog inputs. Noise is always an issue but then again you were saying your songs were too clean

I have been experimenting like crazy with distortion/overdirve/amp modeling itb plugins. They sound pretty good to me.
#29
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #29
Lives for gear
 
aeonlux's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: Tenkay Lakes
Posts: 716

aeonlux is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7161 View Post
It surprises me how few people experiment with amp and cab modelling in electronic music
Agreed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 7161 View Post
roll off everything over 10k on your verbs and delays too
More like 2.5-4KHz!


cheers,
Ian
#30
27th March 2009
Old 27th March 2009
  #30
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,462

sctt_stone is offline
Hi- I do not know if it has been mentioned but Izatope makes a FREE plugin called Vinyl.
It simulates a record player. You can adjust all kinds of parameters like scratches warp dust and year.

I had forgotten how cool it was untill today.
It is great for making things sound Low Fi.

This is a easy free way to approximate what you are after but of course the real answer is to buy a bunch of vintage gear to make music with.
New Reply Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook  Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter  Submit Thread to LinkedIn LinkedIn  Submit Thread to Google+ Google+ 
 
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
Drill_K / Electronic Music Instruments & Electronic Music Production
39
miqer / So much gear, so little time!
0
Zacchino / Rap + Hip Hop engineering & production
8
Diesel / So much gear, so little time!
1

Forum Jump

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.