Login / Register
 
Burial Production Techniques?
New Reply
Subscribe
#31
18th February 2010
Old 18th February 2010
  #31
Lives for gear
 
syzygywell's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 749

syzygywell is offline
Funny finding this thread.. I was just listening to Burial on the way to work and was wondering if it was all done ITB for the most part. It sounded very sample based very much like it its growing on me by the minute.

I was curious if he used any hardware at all. I know Wisp doesn't and he gets some great rubbery sounds out of renoise.
#32
19th September 2011
Old 19th September 2011
  #32
Lives for gear
 
Goa-Dubs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 2,775

Goa-Dubs is offline
Any more inf0 on what he uses besides sf and samples?I love soundforge but cant imagine mixing like this.
#33
20th September 2011
Old 20th September 2011
  #33
Lives for gear
 
Goa-Dubs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 2,775

Goa-Dubs is offline
So all we know about burial is he uses an old version or sf.Maybe.This guy has really flown under the radar.
#34
20th September 2011
Old 20th September 2011
  #34
Gear nut
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Linz, AT
Posts: 127

mschreiber is offline
#35
26th January 2012
Old 26th January 2012
  #35
Gear maniac
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 197

dankelly is offline
After reading the recently started thread on Burial I decided to search for others and this one popped up. I was wondering what peoples thoughts were on the interview posted in the last thread.

I read it, and genuinely didn't make any sense of half of it. I love the basic approach that he takes to making music, and it really goes to show that even the simplest of set ups can yield amazing results if you have the talent to back it up. But I feel a bit puzzled after reading the interview. It seems extremely deep, and Im interested to know if others have this kind of thought process when piecing a track together? I barely even have an idea before I start other than 'I'm gonna try and make a deep house track with groovy drums'!
#36
26th January 2012
Old 26th January 2012
  #36
Gear addict
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 387

Homunculus is offline
i love his tracks, i love the atmosphere, i like the sound of his wet drums, im pretty sure he uses melodyne or autotune for the vocals, i like how even though the song was done inside a computer it feels like the music is coming from an outside place
#37
26th January 2012
Old 26th January 2012
  #37
Lives for gear
 
7 Hz's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,235

7 Hz is offline
Quote:
Burial in 2006 : That’s why I like dubstep now because that’s when you know the music is in good shape because everyone’s in splinter cells. They’re in the ditch – there’s no highway to attract the rubbish producers. The lights of the highway – that’s when it goes shit. But right now it’s all ditch, just darkness, everyone’s just off, off wandering. That’s what I love and original jungle was like that, before it went shit. I mean I like a dark bassline like the next man, but you can’t have ‘male rage’ music. It’s good to have girls liking it.
It's a shame the same term has been used for the US stuff as well, Skrillix and Burial are poles apart.

Another producer I knew, Aaron-Carl, did his stuff only on Soundforge.
Quote
1
#38
26th January 2012
Old 26th January 2012
  #38
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 776

Dogboy73 is offline
Burial's Untrue album is one of the best things I've heard in recent years. I absolutely love that album. Not a fan of the Dubstep/Grime (or whatever they call it these days!) stuff at all. But Burial is on a different level. Amazing stuff.

Interesting to read about how he works in Sound Forge. I'm a long time SF user (since long before Sony took it over from Sonic Foundry). But I can't imagine how this is done because you can't have seperate tracks.

Reminds me of a guy I was talking to some years ago. Can't remember his name now (Richard someone I think) but he released stuff as Verbose on the Neo Ouija record label. I remember him telling me that all his stuff was put together using Cool Edit. He didn't use a sequencer. He recorded audio from his synths & other sound sources & then just tracked everything in Cool Edit. I remember him saying it gave him a lot more freedom to just slide stuff around to where it sounded good. As opposed to precisley editing & positioning it using a conventional sequencers grid.

Very interesting way of working. It's kind of like with the old samplers. You couldn't see a waveform in order to precisley slice a sample. You had to use your ear to adjust the start position & get it right simply by listening. I suppose we've been spoilt with what we have now. We're working backwards trying to undo the precission in order to give our music a more human, less rigid quality!

As for quantizing MIDI ...... It's the Devil function for music production!!
#39
26th January 2012
Old 26th January 2012
  #39
Gear maniac
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 197

dankelly is offline
Yeah it's good to turn the snap setting to 'sample' in Logic, and turn off the grid markings. You still have the bars and beats markers across the timeline, but it you put a kick rigid on each beat, then turn quantise off and snap set to sample, you can freely move all the beats around in between to create your own personal groove. Some would manually place the kicks as well, but if you aim to create tracks for the dancefloor, not many dj's will b keen to play your music if the kicks are swinging wildly all over the shop.
#40
9th May 2012
Old 9th May 2012
  #40
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Posts: 680

loscolorados is offline
Wire: What did you think when people were saying that you hadn’t produced it all in Sound Forge, it’s a scam.

Burial: Who?

Wire: People on the internet, saying he can’t possibly have done that whole album in Sound Forge.

Burial: Really? Yeah well I did. I'll leave those people to their internet or whatever. Yeah I wish sometimes that I’d gone to college to learn music production, but other times I’m like ‘no, ****, I’m happy I didn’t’.

I don’t really go on the internet, it’s like a ouija board, it’s like letting someone into your head, behind your eyes. It lets randoms in.
Quote
3
#41
9th May 2012
Old 9th May 2012
  #41
3 + infractions, forum membership suspended.
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Brighton UK
Posts: 4,721

offki is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by loscolorados View Post
Wire: What did you think when people were saying that you hadn’t produced it all in Sound Forge, it’s a scam.

Burial: Who?

Wire: People on the internet, saying he can’t possibly have done that whole album in Sound Forge.

Burial: Really? Yeah well I did. I'll leave those people to their internet or whatever. Yeah I wish sometimes that I’d gone to college to learn music production, but other times I’m like ‘no, ****, I’m happy I didn’t’.

I don’t really go on the internet, it’s like a ouija board, it’s like letting someone into your head, behind your eyes. It lets randoms in.
And here we have the true relevance of all these analog vs digital vs vst vs krk vs logic vs genelec vs modular vs mothra vs godzilla debates.
Quote
1
#42
16th October 2012
Old 16th October 2012
  #42
Gear interested
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Flushing
Posts: 1

homenick93 is offline
I believe in simplicity, knowing your tools, blah blah blah. But!!! to answer a simple question like "do you use a sequencer?" and reply "no" is just clearly a response from a person who doesn't want to answer any questions about the more technical aspects of his/her craft.

I don't find it hard to believe he uses soundforge, I do however find it hard to believe he doesn't use a sequencer. He either doesn't know what he's talking about (which is fine, you could not know your tools and still make a great thing) or he is indeed answering the question using the Aphex Twin method of avoid questions by answering them with bullshit.

and before you jump down my throat ... ask yourself

"Dose he really not loop anything?"

looping by very definition is a sequencer. Granted he doesn't have to use a grid to make beats but he still needs to loop.

It's like if someone asked jimi hendrix if he "uses a guitar" and his response was "no"

Also correct me if i'm wrong doesn't Soundforge offer VST support? like you can use massive, native instruments, etc, etc
Quote
1
#43
16th October 2012
Old 16th October 2012
  #43
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,825

bluegreengold is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by homenick93 View Post
looping by very definition is a sequencer. Granted he doesn't have to use a grid to make beats but he still needs to loop.
Only in a broad sense. Sequencer used in the context of electronic music has a meaning which is more in line with the placement of control elements over time, not the actual sound itself. This has maybe been blurred with things like ACID and ableton, stretchy audio etc, but certainly one wouldn't consider a tape loop or a sampler to be a 'sequencer' by definition.
#44
16th October 2012
Old 16th October 2012
  #44
Gear addict
 
Jpchartrand's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 470

Jpchartrand is offline
Burial is probably the only artist who can re pitch vocals and it sounds creative and soulful.

Propa to him just for that

Im surprised not to see more people here on GS talk about Aphex Twin. Is it me or is this guy a time traveler? Seems like he was WAY WAY ahead of his time...
#45
16th October 2012
Old 16th October 2012
  #45
Lives for gear
 
dlmorley's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: Belgium
Posts: 6,240

dlmorley is offline
I love early Aphex Twin. We were on the same label for a while.
He got signed after he sent a Cassette to the label. I was there when it arrived and still remeber feeling astounded.. Incredibly original and musical IMHO.
Drukqs is a superb album too and his "hits" like "windowlicker" and "come to daddy" were impressive to say the least.
Not for everyone, but clearly an exceptionally talented guy.
#46
16th October 2012
Old 16th October 2012
  #46
Gear addict
 
Jpchartrand's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 470

Jpchartrand is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlmorley View Post
I love early Aphex Twin. We were on the same label for a while.
He got signed after he sent a Cassette to the label. I was there when it arrived and still remeber feeling astounded.. Incredibly original and musical IMHO.
Drukqs is a superb album too and his "hits" like "windowlicker" and "come to daddy" were impressive to say the least.
Not for everyone, but clearly an exceptionally talented guy.
Holy crap that's crazy to think you were there when the first cassette from him came in!

I still remember the first time I heard the Richard D James album...It completely changed my view of what music was and what it could be. For some strange reason, his song Fingerbib has always struck an emotional cord in me.

Did you ever meet the guy?
#47
16th October 2012
Old 16th October 2012
  #47
Lives for gear
 
dlmorley's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2002
Location: Belgium
Posts: 6,240

dlmorley is offline
It was a big moment for me too, hearing his tape.
Yes, I met him a couple of times. We e-mailed too for a while about gear..he wanted a mixer and asked me about it and of course, he is into synths like me! Of course, he also has a lot more than me !!!
He seems very nice actually.
#48
16th October 2012
Old 16th October 2012
  #48
Gear maniac
 
FullCount's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 269

FullCount is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by homenick93 View Post
I believe in simplicity, knowing your tools, blah blah blah. But!!! to answer a simple question like "do you use a sequencer?" and reply "no" is just clearly a response from a person who doesn't want to answer any questions about the more technical aspects of his/her craft.

I don't find it hard to believe he uses soundforge, I do however find it hard to believe he doesn't use a sequencer. He either doesn't know what he's talking about (which is fine, you could not know your tools and still make a great thing) or he is indeed answering the question using the Aphex Twin method of avoid questions by answering them with bullshit.

and before you jump down my throat ... ask yourself

"Dose he really not loop anything?"

looping by very definition is a sequencer. Granted he doesn't have to use a grid to make beats but he still needs to loop.

It's like if someone asked jimi hendrix if he "uses a guitar" and his response was "no"

Also correct me if i'm wrong doesn't Soundforge offer VST support? like you can use massive, native instruments, etc, etc


I don't even know where to start. Let's start at the baseless accusations that Burial is a liar. Do you have any proof of this? No? So why would you even go down this route?

Quote:
looping by very definition is a sequencer.
Not really. Loops are not a sequencer.

Quote:
He either doesn't know what he's talking about
You don't know who you're talking about.

What Burial probably means by doesn't use a sequencer is that he isn't shifting notes(MIDI information) around in a grid. He's recording his sources, or samples, and then taking the resulting audio and placing it in soundforge tracks where he sees fit. Not hard to believe. He's using a "sequencer" but he isn't sequencing anything.
Quote
1
#49
16th October 2012
Old 16th October 2012
  #49
Gear addict
 
blizt's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 411

blizt is offline
One day I was checking the tempos from burial untre and untiled, and guess what... Some tracks where going to a steady tempo while others where really going free. Really hard to mix in. So it's up to you. I dont think he's telling lies but I do think he's not telling all the truth behind his method. I mean doing all his stuff on crappy headphones... Maybe someone is doing the mixdowns?

New album please!
#50
19th March 2013
Old 19th March 2013
  #50
Gear maniac
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 249

flsh333 is offline
I'm still baffled about how Burial goes about getting his chords and sounds just from Sound Forge?

I take it he must sample from everywhere to get chords and sounds (maybe major and minor key samples) and then pitch them up and down in SF and overlap and mix them all to a 2-track master?

I get the impression he is using an older version of SF that he's used to - so no multichannel mixing..(which i think is clunky at the best of times in a multi-track) - also i think some of his albums were done before SF went multichannel.

So I think it must be a long winded process of pitching and trying out by pasting over the same file?
#51
19th March 2013
Old 19th March 2013
  #51
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 586

slick easy is offline
Damn fish why don't you resurrect all the burial threads
#52
19th December 2013
Old 19th December 2013
  #52
Gear interested
 
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 2

chrisdawsons is offline
Just found this thread, interesting read. I can tell a lot of parallels with Burial's approach and mine.

I started off as a radio producer using Cool Edit Pro, way back when. Played guitar but this opened up a world of new things to learn to make music. Just by using loops (sampleswap is a beast!) and chopping them up, reversing them, slapping loads of fx on them etc I was able to create some pretty cool stuff.

Of course this led to discovering Ableton, which brought a bit of order to everything - with sequencing, quantization etc everything became more regimented.

Problem now is that I get 'blinking curser syndrome' - I'm a journalist by trade and sometimes starting the story is the hardest thing. Staring at that little curser blinking away while you think "how the hell do I start this article"... Same thing happens now, I have all these DAWs, great equipment etc but can I start a song properly?! Can I take a passage of music and make it into a song? Not any more.

Using Cool Edit there were restrictions but it made you work around them, almost in spite of them. Everything Burial said about working 'visually' rang true too.

Might give Adobe Audition a try...use Ableton for instruments but manually place stuff in Audition without a grid.

On another note - Ableton Push is pretty decent. Good for those 'blinking curser' moments...
#53
1st March 2014
Old 1st March 2014
  #53
Gear interested
 
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1

therobotalien is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyezenears View Post
Sounds like a quassi 6/4 to me
It's 2-step garage. Not really a progressive signature it's just on a very heavy shuffle with snares occasioanlly hitting on 8th note off-beats
#54
1st March 2014
Old 1st March 2014
  #54
Gear nut
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 98

Leviathant is offline
Since someone else resurrected this thread, I figured I'd throw my 2 cents in, and relate my own experience mixing tracks in Soundforge.

In the late 90s/early 2000s, I used to write music using a combination of Impulse Tracker and Sound Forge. The trick, if you can call it that, was to use Paste Mix. I think the last thing I did using that method was a remix of The Big Comedown by Nine Inch Nails. There were stems from the original song posted online, and I basically ran them through the f/x that came with Sound Forge, and at least one filterbank-style DirectX plugin. I made parts of the new backing rhythms in Impulse Tracker, and basically did a whole lot of Paste-Mix trial and error putting it all together.

Not putting myself (especially a 14 year-old track I did) in the same space as Burial, musically speaking, but it made me smile to see him talking about mixing in Sound Forge.
#55
2nd March 2014
Old 2nd March 2014
  #55
Gear interested
 
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 1

andius is offline
#56
17th March 2014
Old 17th March 2014
  #56
Gear nut
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 148

animalfarm is offline
Just thought I'd add this here. In case anyone brings up the good ol burial=four tet discussion ;-)

BURIAL
#57
17th March 2014
Old 17th March 2014
  #57
Gear nut
 
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 136

Teofunk is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leviathant View Post
Since someone else resurrected this thread, I figured I'd throw my 2 cents in, and relate my own experience mixing tracks in Soundforge.

In the late 90s/early 2000s, I used to write music using a combination of Impulse Tracker and Sound Forge. The trick, if you can call it that, was to use Paste Mix. I think the last thing I did using that method was a remix of The Big Comedown by Nine Inch Nails. There were stems from the original song posted online, and I basically ran them through the f/x that came with Sound Forge, and at least one filterbank-style DirectX plugin. I made parts of the new backing rhythms in Impulse Tracker, and basically did a whole lot of Paste-Mix trial and error putting it all together.

Not putting myself (especially a 14 year-old track I did) in the same space as Burial, musically speaking, but it made me smile to see him talking about mixing in Sound Forge.

Wohoo! Another Impulse Tracker guy here! Yeah, I can also imagine doing songs in Sound Forge. You've nice song there btw. Actually I was browsing some of my old .IT files to check some samples and noticed that I think it's musically pretty good if you CANT use any FX in your DAW, that you've to actually think how sounds and samples go together.

Another more bitter note: Sometimes it feels weird when I hear stuff on radio that reminds me off stuff that me or my mates were into 15 years ago and everybody else didn't even consider to be music.
Quote
1
#58
18th March 2014
Old 18th March 2014
  #58
Lives for gear
 
choond's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,503

choond is offline
I was slow off the mark getting into Burial. I'm not a garage fan and two step isn't usually my thing. But geez, everything Burial makes, I absolutely love. Especially loved his collaborations with Four tet and Massive attack...they added a bit of Engineering goodness without losing Burial's style.

The fact that he works 100% intuitively via hand mangled samples in SF is amazing & inspiring. No music training- he just makes original , moody stuff that always sounds right.

PS. Loved his comments about `male rage music'. I agree, dance music that alienate females, and female dancers especially , isn't good for Dance Floors, and keeps the music marginalized...and not in an `underground' kind of way.

Also, wonder how much him living in South London influences his music? That's gotta be one of the worst places to live in the western world...and produced a lot of great musicians too.
#59
18th March 2014
Old 18th March 2014
  #59
Gear addict
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 311

Polygon Cube is offline
There are two things i love from Burial (besides his music), it's the way he speaks of music and making it, it reminds me that i dont need super-expensive, high-quality gear or to have to follow the rules and regulations for making music...an emotion is enough.

And his willingness to remain anonymous, ghostly and secretive is something i look up to, i hope i dont sound like an anti-social freak, but there has been more than one time where i don't ant to have to see or deal with any person (except my sister she's cool)...more than once, i'd wish i could wake up, or come back, to a near empty home (or just with my sis), just me and my thoughts, me and my music and my numbers and my circuits, just us and me and us...

In particular, these are quotes which i love the most from him:

"The tunes are made where they're made, somewhere in my building,
the roof or wherever, but not in some airtight studio."

"It’s not the drums, it’s the impression of the drums. I’ve done bare
drums I love – but then they fall apart when some studio boy says
“oh your snare’s too loud.” But that’s the pirate sound… just rollage.
Not an individual drum sound, it’s something else. It’s just the spirit of it,
the roll of it. The drums, they’re slinky. Cold sounding. They could go anywhere.
And I know some of that stuff sounds well dated, but I love it."

“I like making tunes that maybe help people get lost in…
As soon as you say you’re going to make a certain genre of tune,
then you’re restricting things…and that’s always been a bit wrong to me.
You can’t let a type of music you care about just become another
sample-pack or genre…or it will get globally ****ed over.”

"No genre, just a sound."

Last edited by Polygon Cube; 18th March 2014 at 03:11 AM.. Reason: I forgot to add some more poetic stuff to my post...but seriously, does anyone read these? Their so small...
Quote
2
#60
18th March 2014
Old 18th March 2014
  #60
Lives for gear
 
choond's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,503

choond is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polygon Cube View Post

In particular, these are quotes which i love the most from him:

"The tunes are made where they're made, somewhere in my building,
the roof or wherever, but not in some airtight studio."

"It’s not the drums, it’s the impression of the drums. I’ve done bare
drums I love – but then they fall apart when some studio boy says
“oh your snare’s too loud.” But that’s the pirate sound… just rollage.
Not an individual drum sound, it’s something else. It’s just the spirit of it,
the roll of it. The drums, they’re slinky. Cold sounding. They could go anywhere.
And I know some of that stuff sounds well dated, but I love it."

“I like making tunes that maybe help people get lost in…
As soon as you say you’re going to make a certain genre of tune,
then you’re restricting things…and that’s always been a bit wrong to me.
You can’t let a type of music you care about just become another
sample-pack or genre…or it will get globally ****ed over.”

"No genre, just a sound."

Lovely quotes, thank you for posting those
New Reply Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook  Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter  Submit Thread to LinkedIn LinkedIn  Submit Thread to Google+ Google+ 
 
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
silverdisk / So much gear, so little time!
9
ColourSurround / So much gear, so little time!
5
robd / Electronic Music Instruments & Electronic Music Production
17
spsnoise / So much gear, so little time!
2
jazzy655 / Rap + Hip Hop engineering & production
23

Forum Jump

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.