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Resotune anyone?
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michaels
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20th October 2008
Old 20th October 2008
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Resotune anyone?

Just curious if anyone out there has used Resotune yet. No youtube videos or discussions I can find anywhere. I'm a studio owner that can't tune a set for crap and it costs me 30.00 a pop for the drum tech to come out and tune the studio kits. If I could drop 350.00 and be done with it I'd gladly do it but with no feedback on this unit other than whats on their site I thought I'd ask.

Thanks in advance!
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21st October 2008
Old 21st October 2008
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FWIW - nobody at drumforum has tried it either. Lots of people asking, but nobody wants to plop down the $350 (and most of the guys there know how to tune drums, I guess).

I agree, though - if it works well.. it's worth it. Maybe someone can get the company to send a demo unit to try?
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21st October 2008
Old 21st October 2008
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Getting a Bob Gatzen DVD and a weekend with a 12" Tom (with new single ply heads) will get you on the way.

It's not a trick, its training.
If you are able to tune a guitar by ear, than you should be able to learn how to tune a drum!

The good thing about learning it is, that you will learn how to get a certain sound.
The reso tune helps you only to get a certain note out of a drum.
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21st October 2008
Old 21st October 2008
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Quote:
If you are able to tune a guitar by ear, than you should be able to learn how to tune a drum!
I personally find tuning drums WAY harder than guitar (I can tune drums, but I'd hardly say I'm 'good' at it). Guitar, you're tuning a single note - drums (assuming you're not using concert toms) you have to tune two notes together. Those two notes can be the same, at intervals, or just a disaster.
"-)
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22nd October 2008
Old 22nd October 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biggator6 View Post
I personally find tuning drums WAY harder than guitar (I can tune drums, but I'd hardly say I'm 'good' at it). Guitar, you're tuning a single note - drums (assuming you're not using concert toms) you have to tune two notes together. Those two notes can be the same, at intervals, or just a disaster.
"-)
First of all learn to get one head in tune.

Place the drum on a blanket to muffel the oposit side.

Get the lowest possible pitch (a tone not a vladps or plöck).
Make sure the overall pitch is represented at the center of the head as well as next to each tuning lug.

You can tune the head with out listening to the pitch at the lugs, by striking the drum dead center with a mallet and tune down and up one lug.
You should be able to hear a interference like with 2 guitar strings out of tune.
Wile you move the lug you should notice the interference get less (or more).
Find the place for that lug were there is the least amout of it.
When you are around the drum once you should be close to a good pitch.

Next flip the drum over and get the other side to the lowest posibble tone and in tune with it self.

Now you can mount the drum and check for the intervall.

I advice to strike the batter head now and bring up the reso head by 1/4 turn on each lug (keep hitting the batter head and listen wile you do so).
Once you have tuned them up, listen again.
Repeat to tune the reso up by 1/4 turn until it sounds to "funny".

You can go back to the lowest possible pitch on the reso and now tune up the batter side by 1/4 turns per lug.

This will give you a good idea of what pitch relations result in which sound.

Sounds like a bit of work, but it is relativly easy.



Keep in mind shitty old heads might make tuning the drum in question impossible, so will a aout of round drum/hoop or a ****ed up bearingedge.

So get new heads and sit down with your 12" tom for a weekend.


BTW a good starting point is to messure for equal distance from each bridge to the hoop.
If you notice that turning one lug up does not get the pitch up infront of the lug, than try tuning up the other side.


Oh and get a Bob Gatzen DVD, there is all one need to know about tuning on it.
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22nd October 2008
Old 22nd October 2008
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Oh another quick hint:
The higher the reso the shorter the sustain will get.
It also gives you more energie/volume as well as a more concrete pitch.

Very low tuned resos can give you that endless chorusy tail on the drum, which realy sucks under close micing.
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22nd October 2008
Old 22nd October 2008
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Thanks all but I have no desire whatsoever to learn how to tune a drum. Been there tried it and I haven't the patiecnce for it - hence me paying a drum tech to do it for a few years now. No matter how good I think I have them he makes them sing.

I'll keep checking out the resotune thing and surely someday someone will buy one and post a review of it.
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17th January 2009
Old 17th January 2009
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Sorry, for the late reply, I don't usually lurk on this forum...

I did post one video on youtube and there are a couple on my website.

Sorry no free loaners. We do accept returns for a modest restocking fee, when returned in like new condition and within 30 days.

I can answer any specific questions not already addressed on my website or FAQ.

For good general tuning advice I recommend Drum Tuning Bible

Good Luck

JR
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18th January 2009
Old 18th January 2009
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John -

Thanks for chiming in.. the resotune is a product I've been eying a bit, but have been hesitant (and a bit stubborn.. just trying to learn to tune better in the 'traditional' way).

A few suggestions, if you don't mind (feel free to ignore them)..
The videos on the site are kind of helpful, but I'd love to see a demo put up that shows a real 'use case'. Zoom out a bit so we can see the whole drum - start with brand-new heads.. and bring them into tune using the device. I think that would give a far better idea of how it works.

The videos are zoomed in so close that you can't even see how it sits on the drum, or if it has to be moved one lug at a time, or if it sits on the head alone or on the rim or both.

An explanation of how to tune a bass drum with it would be cool - not sure how it would work.

It's a cool idea, and I'm sure it works well - but since so many people are skeptical, a good website and demo videos certainly wouldn't hurt. I mean - there's very few actual pictures of the resotune on the site!
"-)
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18th January 2009
Old 18th January 2009
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Agreed - I'd like to see it in action used on a new heads showing both batter and resonant tuning and how it sounds afterwards. Really just show the unit in action being used - close up and far away to see HOW it's used.

I too have been SERIOUSLY eyeballing this unit for several months as well as my boss at work but neither of us are willing to take the plunge yet.

Are there any dealers - Guitar Sinner maybe - that has a unit we can try out? I detest walking thru the doors of that place but I could suffer thru it to see this in action for sure!
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18th January 2009
Old 18th January 2009
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Any gearslut with a decent studio in Hickory, MS?

I would suggest a demo video shoot at a studio.
Tune the set and record the sound "multitrack".
Retune for different styles...

Just a thought.
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18th January 2009
Old 18th January 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biggator6 View Post
John -

Thanks for chiming in.. the resotune is a product I've been eying a bit, but have been hesitant (and a bit stubborn.. just trying to learn to tune better in the 'traditional' way).

A few suggestions, if you don't mind (feel free to ignore them)..
The videos on the site are kind of helpful, but I'd love to see a demo put up that shows a real 'use case'. Zoom out a bit so we can see the whole drum - start with brand-new heads.. and bring them into tune using the device. I think that would give a far better idea of how it works.

The videos are zoomed in so close that you can't even see how it sits on the drum, or if it has to be moved one lug at a time, or if it sits on the head alone or on the rim or both.

An explanation of how to tune a bass drum with it would be cool - not sure how it would work.

It's a cool idea, and I'm sure it works well - but since so many people are skeptical, a good website and demo videos certainly wouldn't hurt. I mean - there's very few actual pictures of the resotune on the site!
"-)

Advice is always welcome, while I can only guarantee I'll listen, not follow..

I am a small operation so I need to balance my work effort between satisfying current customers, and new product development. I know that the larger market for this product is at a much lower price point, which requires much more development and tooling.

I won't make excuses for the video but they are crude DIY efforts by me. If I pan out, you'll see my lack of an appropriate space for videotaping. My next projects in that area is to show how to use RESOTUNE on an 8" tom, awkward because of the drum diameter relative to the RESOTUNE. I also plan to show how to tune a bass drum, which is the other extreme for size, but not as awkward. You just lie the bass drum on it's back and use some longer struts (like hardware store dowels) to support the RESOTUNE above the heads for tuning. For measurting pitch you don't want to damp the opposite head on the floor, but for clearing the lugs the opposite head doesn't matter as much.

JR
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18th January 2009
Old 18th January 2009
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Quote:
If I pan out, you'll see my lack of an appropriate space for videotaping.
I'd bet we can find someone from this very site near Hickory, MS that would be willing to let you use their studio (and maybe the house kit) for the demo.
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18th January 2009
Old 18th January 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michaels View Post
Agreed - I'd like to see it in action used on a new heads showing both batter and resonant tuning and how it sounds afterwards. Really just show the unit in action being used - close up and far away to see HOW it's used.

I too have been SERIOUSLY eyeballing this unit for several months as well as my boss at work but neither of us are willing to take the plunge yet.

Are there any dealers - Guitar Sinner maybe - that has a unit we can try out? I detest walking thru the doors of that place but I could suffer thru it to see this in action for sure!
There is a copy of the owners manual available on my website, but that may be as cryptic as my comments here. Drum voicing as we all know is pretty subjective. I make a formal policy to not provide specific voicing advice. AFAIK only one drum maker provides general (note) tuning advice, DW and that is a little vague about relative tuning between batter and resonant.

I am selling the equivalent of measurement equipment. So I can tell you very accurately what note a drum is tuned to, but not what note it "should" be tuned to. We are still in the crawling days of scientific or technical drum tuning. In the future when this technology is more common I expect drum makers and head manufacturers to be more forthcoming with at least ranges of tuning targets. I appreciate this is a bit of a cop-out but I am one man and like I said I must ration my efforts.

My general advice when changing heads is to first read the old head pitch and use that as a starting point. It may even be a time saver to use a lug torque or head tension device to ballpark the head tuning, before fine tuning with the RESOTUNE. Of course if you change to a different weight head the same pitch will occur at a different tension so you will have a different stick feel etc.

At present we only sell direct and do not have any dealers or distributers. I have worked in the MI industry for decades and am well aware of the mark ups and pricing structure needed for sales through such channels. The retail price already considered too high by many (me included) would need to be much higher. Hopefully with later generations I can get the price down where it needs to be to address the broader market.

JR
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18th January 2009
Old 18th January 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutmeg II. View Post
Any gearslut with a decent studio in Hickory, MS?

I would suggest a demo video shoot at a studio.
Tune the set and record the sound "multitrack".
Retune for different styles...

Just a thought.
I had one drummer with a video rig working on a video owners manual for about a year before I shut him down, because he didn't do anything. I have access to a nice studio in Orlando, and planned to road trip down there to whip out something quick.

After shooting my very crude efforts, I am much more aware of the back ground work involved. I may still end up on that road trip, but need to get story boards, and copy, and much more home work done in preparation.

I do have studio owners among my customers, I probably need to be more aggressive about soliciting quotes from them about their experience.

JR
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18th January 2009
Old 18th January 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biggator6 View Post
I'd bet we can find someone from this very site near Hickory, MS that would be willing to let you use their studio (and maybe the house kit) for the demo.
tutt Good one...

Years ago when I headed up the engineering effort for Peavey's recording product division (AMR), I spent some time in a local Meridian studio (25 miles from where I am now based). That studio was less photogenic than my lab. At Peavey we ended up incorporating a nice recording studio into an auditorium upgrade, but I would rather drive to Orlando than try to use that facility.

I suspect there are now some OK studios with video capability closer to me than Orlando, but I'm too cheap to pay the going rate for a professional video, even at MS rates.

JR
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19th January 2009
Old 19th January 2009
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Quote:
when I headed up the engineering effort for Peavey's recording product division (AMR)
What years did you head up AMR? I've used some of that gear (VMP/VCL and the consoles) and it's some seriously great stuff.
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19th January 2009
Old 19th January 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biggator6 View Post
What years did you head up AMR? I've used some of that gear (VMP/VCL and the consoles) and it's some seriously great stuff.
I was recruited in '85 to be lead engineer for AMR which was a separate division at the time. Shortly thereafter it was rolled into the corporate parent (Peavey) and I was put over all mixer products. In 15 years there I worked in several areas from engineering to marketing and product management.

I did the big (AMR Production Series) consoles, with one junior engineer helping. I didn't do the vacuum tube gear designs, but did influence the feature set and general design decisions. For example on the VMP, it was my suggestion to make the volume knob go to 11.

JR
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19th January 2009
Old 19th January 2009
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My friend just installed one of your AMR consoles... the thing is beautiful.
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16th August 2009
Old 16th August 2009
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Still looking

Wanna drop the dime on this but still looking for user reviews! Anyone so far?
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7th October 2009
Old 7th October 2009
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Just bought one.

Better instructions would be a definate plus!!! I'm pretty lost actually. Will play with it for a few hours and see ahat happens.
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7th October 2009
Old 7th October 2009
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This seems pretty interesting...
I've been really scared of all the drum tuners on the market.
After how ever many years of tuning, I've never had anyone tell me "Yo, your drums sound like shit!" before so I pray to little baby Jesus I got it down.

If this thing works well, it'd be interesting to see how it stacks up against the $50 Tama tuner and what not. Probably two different sciences though.


Looks like a cool piece of machinery though, that's for sure!
#23
18th October 2010
Old 18th October 2010
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I know this thread is old but thought I'd chime in as I've had a resotune for a little while now. I find it works really well for making sure the drum heads are in tune with themselves. I like to use the general tighter/looser aproach to get in the drum in the right place then use the resotune to fine tune. If you make up a set of (for a lack of a better word) sticks with some brackets to allow the ressotune to sit just low enough it can even be used for kick drums (which I find hard to get just right by ear) which really opens up the sound. It can also be a huge time saver for someone who doesn't tune drums to often. It can even be used to set two heads to a specific interval or make sure two heads are identical in pitch. I like to use it in conjunction with a drum dial to get the head about where I want it, pick a lug that matches the tension I'm after as the reference and go from there. Makes tuning a breeze once you get use to it for a non drummer like myself. You can even save settings for sounds you may like to use again for future reference.
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