Is this flutter echo?
Fiddlermatt
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#1
25th May 2013
Old 25th May 2013
  #1
Gear interested
 

Thread Starter
Is this flutter echo?

Hi, I've recently started learning how to record at home. The genre I record is bluegrass. My signal chain is Audio Technica AT2020->Tascam Us200->Laptop/Reaper. My room isn't the best acoustically, but I've started adding bass traps as per the advice on the forums. Anyway, on to my problem!

In my recordings, the guitar and mandolin sound fine. I really like the tone I'm getting. My fiddle, however, is giving me fits. It sounds boxy, flat, and nothing like how it sounds in real life. Also, once I get above A440, it suddenly becomes screechy sounding. I think the problem may be flutter echoes, as my room has parallel walls with wood paneling. Here is a plot spectrum of the open a string on my fiddle (440hz). Does that look like flutter echo/comb filtering or is simply the natural harmonics of the instrument? Also included is a mp3 of my very first mix. where you can hear the boxiness of the fiddle.

I assume if it is flutter echo, I need to treat my parallel walls. The room is only 12x14x8' so I assume I will need absorption rather than diffusion?
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Is this flutter echo?-a440.jpg  
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#2
26th May 2013
Old 26th May 2013
  #2
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sheggs's Avatar
 

#3
26th May 2013
Old 26th May 2013
  #3
Gear addict
 

With respect I would suggest that it is impossible to determine if flutter echo is present from that plot, it is just a sample (or average) at one point in time of a fairly complex waveform (fiddle). The easiest way would be to walk around your room making one single hand clap at various locations. You will hear flutter by multiple returns probably with a distinct "ringing" at various frequencies. You would be better recording the hand clap and analysing that rather than your fiddle which is, as you mentioned, rich in it's own harmonic structure. Additionally if I were you I would also look to display the impulse response (ie in the time domain) at locations you suspect you have a problem to confirm which reflective surfaces are causing the problems.
#4
26th May 2013
Old 26th May 2013
  #4
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sheggs's Avatar
 

I did say could be. I would recommend using the REW software to help determine what is going on in the room.
Here's an easy guide on how to use this free software.

Room EQ Wizard Tutorial - GIK Acoustics
#5
26th May 2013
Old 26th May 2013
  #5
Gear Guru
 
Ethan Winer's Avatar
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Icecube1 View Post
it is just a sample (or average) at one point in time of a fairly complex waveform (fiddle).
Agreed, and the frequencies look like normal harmonics of an A-440.

Quote:
The easiest way would be to walk around your room making one single hand clap at various locations. You will hear flutter by multiple returns probably with a distinct "ringing" at various frequencies.
Agreed again. I think of the sound of flutter echo as a "boyng" sound, with a distinct pitch.

--Ethan

The Acoustic Treatment Experts
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