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PLEASE HELP soundproofing Basement cheap
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pomar
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#1
6th April 2012
Old 6th April 2012
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PLEASE HELP soundproofing Basement cheap

I live in a basement and want to soundproof it on a budget. there are a lot of threads for soundproofing a basement but the layout of mine isn't like the others i saw. so here's the specs on it:

Its basically one big room: 25' x 40', although it has two bedrooms and two bathrooms built into it lining the back half of the basement taking up a total of about 335 sq'. All the walls and the floor are made of very thick concrete. The ceiling is about 7' high with rivits 1' deep by 6" wide and 2.5' apart. It is made of wood, not sure the specs on it though as far as insulation between layers.

Although the basement is large there is a lot of stuff down there taking up space, and most walls are covered, in some way

There are three areas where sound can leak out (besides the ceiling). There is a staircase with a metal gate and a wood door leading out. These two doors are separated by a 3x3' space whose walls are wood and drywall. There are also two circular fans that suck air out of the basement. They basically form 2 large circular holes in the back concrete wall and have a fan inside. both are on the back end of the basement and lead out into an alley that has a decent amount of street noise.

I want to soundproof this guy in the sense that i don't want sound getting out. Also budget is a huge factor. I'm talkin i cant spend more than one or two hundred if possible.

Here was my plan. I was going to put soundproofing foam between the rivets in the ceiling and line the 1'x6" rivet too. I was also going to line the walls of the staircase leading up to the door out. I was going to line both sides of the gate, the walls and ceiling of the 3x3' space between the gate and the door and the back of the front door with foam as well as ceil the door by lining it with acoustic seal and putting a door sweep on it.

For the two fans i thought i'd get two pieces of cardboard, line one entire side with foam and the other with a circular piece of foam that would be the size/shape of the hole of the fan. Also i figured id place foam along the back wall around the two holes where the fans are. Finally i'd make a large removable wall out of cardboard and foam to put in front of the whole wall with the two vent fans.

I also plan on putting large amounts of foam on various parts of the walls specifically in the front half of the basement where music is played.

will this help? is it worth doing? what parts would be the most/least effective?

thanks to anybody who reads all this and helps.
#2
7th April 2012
Old 7th April 2012
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Quote:
Here was my plan. I was going to put soundproofing foam between the rivets in the ceiling and line the 1'x6" rivet too. I was also going to line the walls of the staircase leading up to the door out. I was going to line both sides of the gate, the walls and ceiling of the 3x3' space between the gate and the door and the back of the front door with foam as well as ceil the door by lining it with acoustic seal and putting a door sweep on it.
Foam can not sound proof in any way. If anything it will absorb upper frequencies inside of the room but that is not going to stop sound from getting out of the basement. Soundproofing takes mass and can be very costly.
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7th April 2012
Old 7th April 2012
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Sound absorbing panels won't do much (like 1%) for keeping sound in. Think about your car. Open the window even an inch and it gets lots louder. You need to seal the space and use a lot of mass. This won't happen cheaply. 2 layers of drywall with spacing will only give you 20db- 25db and would cost a lot more than a couple hundred bucks. That might not be enough reduction for many people. It gets lots more expensive from there.
pomar
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7th April 2012
Old 7th April 2012
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thanks for the info. i didn't realize that the foam wouldn't really help. i realize im gonna have to spend a little more money, but as far as what could be done to soundproof this thing as inexpensive as possible; could i make a panel with two layers of drywall (with some sort of insulation inbtwn) about the size of the wall where the fans are (panel not being something airtight, but as close as possible while still being removable) and have it block any sound?

also it would make a difference sealing the door right? lining the edges with that foam tape and adding a door sweep to it to make it airtight. also ive read that lining the back of an airtight door with something (maybe not foam) helps keep sound in.

Would replacing the metal gate with another high density door and making that airtight help?

also anyone know if this stuff's any good?
Audimute Acoustic Enhancement and Soundproofing Products - Audimute Soundproofing

thanks again for any help you can give!
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7th April 2012
Old 7th April 2012
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Forget that stuff. Low mass, high cost.

You can build a very well isolated room at a reasonable cost if you follow the following basic, tried and true methodology.

#1 Decouple the framing. This can be done with staggered stud or double stud walls. To decouple the ceiling, consider clips&channel. Resilient Channel (RC-1) attempts to decouple, however there is no industry standard or specification for its construction, so I’d be concerned about using it.

#2 Install absorption in the cavities. This means standard fiberglass R13 in the walls, R19 in the ceiling. Know that there is no data that supports that any other insulation (including the “acoustic” labeled, and recycled cotton) works better. Also, foam (open or closed cell) is superior for thermal, but distinctly worse for acoustic. Use the cheapest fiberglass you can find.

#3 Add mass. Nothing better than standard 5/8” TypeX. Great mass at 70+ pounds a board, and cheap at $7 a sheet. Use two layers. Only mud and tape the final layer.

#4 Consider damping these drywall panels with one of several field-applied damping compounds. Some work better than others, and independent lab data shows you get what you pay for here.

After that, you’d turn your attention to the ventilation, lights and doors. All of these are flanking paths for sound to get out of the formidable room you just built. They can be dealt with fairly easily, but you’ll want to design this in.
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