DIY Acoustic treatment: Will this work?
Old 29th October 2007
  #1
Gear maniac
 
Blister's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
DIY Acoustic treatment: Will this work?

So i'm just starting to treat my 'mixing' room - aka the spare room... and have purchased a pack of Unsulco Polycoustic insulation and some Auralex Mopads for the task.

I've seen people cover DIY rockwool treatments with various cloth materials to keep the fibres from floating around, and for the most part these are ok, but tend to look a bit too DIY in some cases... And thats ok for basments and corners where the visitors never wander. But what if your mixing space is somwhere in your home thats near the main living area? Where people will see your stuff?

I know some wont care too much... and think nothing else matters but the sound. It's a very valid point.

But you guys need to meet my wife.

So after that little rant, here is what I'm thinking.

1. Box-frame the batts (std Batt size is 1160mm x 580mm x 90thick) using 90mm x 35mm framing timber.

2. Macenite backing.

3. Glue the batts inside the frame

4. cover the whole thing (frame and all, if you so choose) in some cool fabrics.

The idea being that thee things will actually look like painted canvas', or close enough not to look cheap and crappy (remember were attempting to 1. keep the wife happy, and 2. get her involved in the process...)

So assuming that the 'looks good' criteria has been addressed (yeah yeah yeah, I know it should be the LAST thing on the list), will this actually work?

Do the sides of the insulation need to be exposed to be effective? Will the wooden sides of teh box-frame impede the absorbtion propoerties of the Polycoustic Batts? What about fabric types for covering? Are there types that should NOT be used for acoustic reasons (excepting the obvious... like sheet metal!!)

I plan to make up 7 or 8 of these things and hang them off the walls in the mixing room. Should look killer. But will they be effective, as I've described?
Old 29th October 2007
  #2
Moderator
 
matt thomas's Avatar
 

It'll work

Just in case, its not normal batts that you use, it needs to be high density stuff, not like what you put in the walls of your house, a sheet of it should hold its shape when you pick it up.

the sides don't need to be exposed, but it helps, a very little bit

fabric you can breath through is a good rough, but not definite, guideline

do a search, there are millions of posts on this

narco
Old 29th October 2007
  #3
Gear maniac
 
dbluefield's Avatar
 

Short answer: It should work

Long answer: Check out John Sayers site. Ethan Winner. Malcolm Chisholm.

The main thing will be the Sabins of the material your using, RFZ, room size -- the list goes on..........

Something is probably definitely better than nothing as long as it absorbs pretty evenly from highs to lows (6' of OC 703 US brand here will absorb very well down to 60Hz or so).

Recording Studio Design :: Index
The Recording Studio Design Page
Build a Better Bass Trap

Good Luck!

Dave
Old 29th October 2007
  #4
jwl
Lives for gear
 
jwl's Avatar
 

Don't put a masonite backing on the panels. Just use the timber frame. If you have an appropriately sized holesaw, cut holes in the frame, as many as you can without making the wood too weak.

Without the backing on them, and with as much surface area as possible exposed, you will get the most absorption. Ideally, straddle some of them (most of them) across the corners of the room.

Also, I think Ethan's Acoustic Treatment and Design for Recording Studios and Listening Rooms is much more useful than his article about how to build that style of basstrap.
Old 29th October 2007
  #5
Gear maniac
 
Blister's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by narco View Post
It'll work

Just in case, its not normal batts that you use, it needs to be high density stuff, not like what you put in the walls of your house, a sheet of it should hold its shape when you pick it up.

the sides don't need to be exposed, but it helps, a very little bit

fabric you can breath through is a good rough, but not definite, guideline

do a search, there are millions of posts on this

narco
Cheers narco. The batts are acoustic specific and are as dense as a really dense thing.
Old 29th October 2007
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Cojo's Avatar
 

Hi.

Don't cover the back with anything but fabric. When you put them on the wall they need to be spaced away from the wall.

The deeper you make them the greater advances there is to expose the sides of the insulation.

The timber for yor frame seems very thick, 35mm!? I would suggest no more then half of that, or even thinner. They are going to get quite heavy anyway! (I know from my own experience)

Good luck!
Old 29th October 2007
  #7
Moderator
 
matt thomas's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blister View Post
Cheers narco. The batts are acoustic specific and are as dense as a really dense thing.
then my guess it they're not the right ones? Actually I'm serious, the stuff they market here in New Zealand as "acoustic" batts are only slightly more dense than normal thermal insulation. To get the real dense stuff I had to go insulation specialists and get stuff that is made for insulating furnaces. When I mentioned it was for acoustics they tried to sell me the "acoustic" stuff which wasn't suitable. So watch out for that.

narco
Old 29th October 2007
  #8
Gear maniac
 
ONE LUV's Avatar
 

i went to ikea and bought some wine red fabrics for putting them over couches. they got a very good size to pull them over the batts...it´s looks really nice. i think they cost 15 € per fabric.

any suggestions on using those heavy fabrics?
Old 29th October 2007
  #9
Gear maniac
 
riffster's Avatar
 

Believe JWL - he's built some nice free standing gobos.

I took some pointers from the John Sayers and built these 2x4 Panels that might give you some ideas. If you were to use OC 703 or equiv. then your fastening methods could change since its rigid & easier to handle. I used muslin fabric which alone in the end held my insulation in place.
Old 30th October 2007
  #10
jwl
Lives for gear
 
jwl's Avatar
 

nice panels, riffster!

Mine are functional, but not too attractive (unfinished still). Plus I still need to redo the legs, they suck.

But they work great....
Old 30th October 2007
  #11
jwl
Lives for gear
 
jwl's Avatar
 

Also, I think it is important to distinguish between acoustic panels, and gobos.

If you want gobos, you need something to stop the sound, ie, the masonite back you mentioned originally (though I'd use something thicker than masonite, ie, plywood, MDF, or even sheetrock). Put absorption around that, and it will do a good job of stopping sound down to a certain point in frequency.

Without the back (masonite or whatever), the sound will travel through the absorber some, but you will get more low end absorption. This is what you want to do with your corner panels, if you put a back on them they won't absorb nearly as much low end (since the low end will "go around" the gobos rather than "go through" the absorbers).
Old 16th December 2012
  #12
Gear maniac
 
abaga129's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by matt thomas View Post
it needs to be high density stuff
Sooooooo would the best material be a black hole? I hear prices on them run pretty high
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
vacantsonar / Bass traps, acoustic panels, foam etc
4
McPhaul / So much gear, so little time!
4
FSPirate / Low End Theory
24
rjay / So much gear, so little time!
18
cajonezzz / So much gear, so little time!
3

Forum Jump
 
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.